French Family Association

The Official Website of the Surname French

Chart #195, “Study” of the
Chronology of
Jacob French 1st, born ca. 1704
and his children Louisa, Jacob 2nd, George, John Peter
Antrim twp, Cumberland Co., (now Franklin Co.), PA
Berkeley Co., VA (now WV)
Washington Co., MD

The Chronology of Jacob French 1st was updated on 3/5/16. Numbers in brackets [ ] show sources and refer to the Bibliography and Records webpage. Revisions: 2009, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2016. Contact.

Contents

FFA Home Page

Schnebele Family

Rohrer Family

Avey Family

French Family

Lancaster, Pennsylvania

George French’s Naturalization and Land Deeds

Antrim, Franklin County, PA

After the Death of Jacob French 1st

Huckleberry Hall

George French reduces his assets before his death ca. 1772

Migration South to Kentucky, Tennessee, and North and South Carolina

Preparing for the Death of Jacob French 2nd

Death of Jacob French 2nd and John French

Death of Louisa French Snively and John Snively

Bibliography and Records

Chronology, 1700-1826

Jacob French 1st, 1704? – 1755, and his children:
     Levina (Louisa) French
     George French, born before 1726
     Jacob French 2nd, born before 1730
     John French, need more research, in fact, all of these French ancestors are not yet proven; this research is what we have at the moment.

Analysis against Jacob French 1st

Deb, this is a very interesting reply — very revealing. Let’s start with Jacob — and as I have checked the Jacob 1st on Chart #195, it seems there is not much on him and that everything I have for Jacob 1st could actually be Jacob 2nd, and George may have been their father as he was the only one naturalized and the others may have been born in America.

— never saw the document that Martha was the wife of Jacob 1st. Could Jacob 2nd have had 2 wives == first wife would be Magdalena as she doesn’t seem to appear very long, and perhaps Martha was second wife???

— Jacob 1st was born ca. 1704 and died 1755, but no real document

— no record of Jacob 1st being naturalized. 

— we now think that the Jacob who lived in Antrim was Jacob 2nd, not Jacob 1st. However, neighbor was Jacob Snively whose son John Snively married Louisa French in the next generation, unless Jacob Snively was actually John Snively???

— was Jacob 1st in Captain John White’s Company in 1757? Must have been Jacob French 2nd

— Jacob Frans who immigrated 30 Oct 1738 was age 34, but not sure this was Jacob French

— Jacob 1st cannot be found until 1748, so this could be Jacob 2nd

— Jacob was mentioned in Maryland in 1758 in the French and Indian War for 6 days, but if he were born in 1704, Jacob 1st would have been about 54 years old — seems more that this would be Jacob 2nd. 

— I do find it odd that Jacob 1st would buy land in 1748 just before he would die in 1755 — probably was Jacob 2nd

— The timing is correct for Jacob 2nd leaving Antrim and buying Huckleberry. Maybe George was his father and he followed his father to Maryland???

— No records for Jacob 1st

— No French on the Antrim Tax List of 1751, but John Scott and John Snively are listed

 

Schnebele Family

1659 -- Johann Jacob Schnebele/Snively (1st) was born in 1659 in Affoltern am Albis, Canton Zurich, Switzerland, immigrated to the new world in 1714 with his wife and children to escape religious persecution, and settled in Lancaster, PA. He was naturalized in Philadelphia, PA, on 4 October 1729, and died in 1743 at age 84. His grandson, John Snively, married Louisa French. His granddaughter Magdalena Snively, married Jacob French 2nd.

1694 Dec 31 -- Jacob Schnebele/Snively (2nd), father of John Snively who married Louisa French in 1743 and Magdalena Snively who married Jacob French 2nd, was born in Affoltern am Albis, Canton Zurich, Switzerland, the son of Johann Jacob Schnebele, died 24 August 1766 and buried at the Snively Family Cemetery in Greencastle, Franklin County, PA, at age 72 [91], immigrated in 1714 with his father. He married twice; his first wife’s name is unknown, who was the mother of John Schnebele (1720-1791) and Christian Schnebele. Jacob Schnebele’s second marriage was in 1736 to Barbara Eberle, and they had children Henry (who inherited much of the French land in Antrim, PA, after the French family moved to Maryland), Joseph, Andrew, Michael (died young), and Jacob. See Snively Genealogy and Schneebeli Genealogy.

1696 -- The western portions of Maryland (including present Washington County) were incorporated into Prince George's County in 1696.

Rohrer Family

1696 Mar 16 -- John Jacob Rohrer was born, son of Hans Michael Rohrer (circa 1665) & Katherine Schwagler; John Jacob was born on 16 Mar 1695/96 in Alsace, Germany, died on 23 Nov 1771 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania; John Jacob married Maria Souder Abt. 1733 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Maria was born on 24 Feb 1715/16 in Mannheim, Germany, died on 11 May 1769 probably in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. He had children Jacob Rohrer 1734-1803, Ann Rohrer 2 Feb 1737/38, Christian Rohrer 1741-1804, Elizabeth Rohrer 1744, John Rohrer 1746-1814, Maria Rohrer 1748-1771, Martin Rohrer 1751, and Susannah Rohrer 1756-1815. John Jacob Rohrer's occupation was in Veterinary Surgery; Lampeter Twp, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

The Rohrers of Lancaster: According to legend, detailed in the "Biographical History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania" by Harris, page 501, and other sources, John or Johannes Rohrer was born in Alsace in 1696.  It is said that in 1725 he, together with his father, brothers and sisters, made their way to Switzerland in an effort to escape French persecution. John was sent back to recover some family belongings and was captured by the French. He escaped from prison (with the help of other distant family) but versions differ as to what happened after his escape. In "John Rohrer of Lancaster County" written in 1939 after extensive research by the author, Albert L. Rohrer, it is said that John made his way to England where he studied veterinary surgery, and later coming to America. That writer relied to a large extent on Harris who says that after arriving in America and acquiring real estate in Lancaster County, this John married Marie Souder in 1732.  They had eight children, four sons were Martin, Daniel, John and Christian. Of their four daughters one married a Houser, one a Smith, one a Bachman and the other was wed to Peter Miller. According to this history, some years later while in Philadelphia and hearing of the landing of a vessel, John went to the ship where he saw that one of the passengers was his father whom he had not seen since escaping from the French.  He was informed that his mother had died and his father had remarried.  His father had two or three sons by his second wife.  This family was destitute and were expected to be sold as indentured servants for their passage money.  John paid the demands and took his father and his family with him.  John later aided his half-brothers in acquiring land near Hagerstown, Maryland.  Albert Rohrer drew the conclusion that Samuel and Martin were the names of these half-brothers and this assumption has been followed by most other writers of the Rohrer genealogy.  One of the exceptions is Edythe Whitley who believed that the two half-brothers were named Frederick & Jacob. See The Rohrer Families by Wickliffe B. Neal page 27). Also see http://www.procuniar.com/BIO-JohnJacobRohrer1695-1771.html by David C. Procuniar, email: dprocuniar@woh.rr.com.

Note: The DNA test results for this Rohrer family and for this French family do not match at all as per research by Linda French Dawson [11].

Avey or Ebby Family

Henry (Henrich) Avey is significant to George French as the two men lived in Maryland and were both naturalized at the same time in 1747. Henry Avey was born in 1702 in Bern, Switzerland, and died in 1766 at age 64 in Frederick County, MD. He married Elizabeth (1704-1763) and had 8 children: Lizabetna 1724, Kathrina, 1726, John 1728-1789, Joseph 1747-1792, Mary, Margaretha, Barbara and Veronica. Jacob French 1st lived in the same period, born ca. 1704 and died ca. 1755. George French may have also lived in this same era as Henry Avey as both were naturalized the same day in Maryland in 1747. Henry Ebby sailed on the ship “Samuel” in 1732 at ae 30; he was the only Ebby aboard.

Three things should be pointed out in Henry Avey’s will pre-1766.

1. Son Jacob Avey, 1733-1789, inherited 100 acres of "Scotch Lott". In 1741 “Scotch Lott” contained 150 acres and the developer/owner was Ewen Mugdanald at that time, MSA S1596 in Prince George’s County, Patent Record LG C, p. 177. By 19 Mar 1747 “Scotch Lott” was 202 acres and the developer/owner was Henry Avey, MSA S1427 in Washington County, Patent Record BT and BY 3, p. 713. County lines changed often in this area, and by 1846 “Scotch Lott” was in Frederick County and belonged to the Kline family. It is unsure how he was able to own land on 19 Mar 1747 when he wasn’t naturalized until 20 Oct 1747 in Maryland. See http://interactive.ancestry.com/49058/FLHG_SettlersMaryland2-0034/101680?backurl=http://person.ancestry.com/tree/18806968/person/2009354250/facts/citation/5393016015/edit/record.

2. The reference to the mother (underlined mine) rather than “his” mother, which may mean this was a second marriage for Henry Avey.

3. The fact that the will was translated from German. The will was written in German but this does not mean that the Avey family was German. As Henry probably could not write (most people could not at that time) he probably had the will written for him. If he had written it, I doubt that he would have spelled his sons names differently.

Joseph Avey, a son of Jacob, was born on May 10, 1767. May 12, 1768, Jacob Evey (Ebey; spelled both ways in document) purchased from John Avey the five acres willed him by Henry Evey. Jacob then turned around and sold 99 acres of “Mistake” and 72 acres of "Scotch Lott" to Jacob Root. In this document, Jacob Evey's sawmill was mentioned at the mouth of a Run of Beaver Creek. Isaac Houser' s hemp mill was also mentioned. Mary, the wife of Jacob Evey, relinquished her dower rights to the above land (MSA 1768).

The above sale left son Jacob Avey with approximately six acres of “Mistake:, 32 acres of "Scotch Lott", a lot in Frederick and part of the land Isaac Houser ted sold to Henry Avey before his death.

On June 22, 1771, Jacob Evey sold to Jacob Saltsgaver 50 acres of land on Waggon Branch of Beaver Creek called "Wine Hill" (MSA 1771). Mary, wife of Jacob, relinquished her dower rights to the land. "Wine Hill" was originally owned by Bambarger (Sharf 1968:985), but perhaps it was the land sold by Isaac Houser to Henry Avey as there is no record of a purchase by Jacob.

On July 25, 1771, Joseph and Jacob Evey sold to Jacob Saltsgaver 27 acres of “Scotch Lott” and six acres of “Mistake”. Eve and Mary, the wives of Joseph and Jacob, relinquished their dower rights to the land (MSA 1771).

The above sale left Jacob with five acres of “Scotch Lott”, a lot in Frederick and nothing left of “Mistake”. John Avey patented at least two tracts of land in what is now Washington County, Maryland: “Avey's Delight and Resurvey” on August 19, 1751, 450 acres, and “Avey's Good Luck” on June 2, 1769, 453 acres (Sharf 1968, Vol.11: 982). I am not certain he had a total of 903 acres or if “Avey's Good Luck” is just a new name for “Avey's Delight” with new boundries, as he sold and purchased land adjacent to “Avey's Delight” from 1760 to 1773 (MSA 1760, 1765, & 1773). What is important is that the land is on the east side of Beaver Creek (MSA 1754) and both tracts are adjacent to a tract of land called “Mt. Pleasant” (MSA 1754; MSA 1773). This means that both tracts of land are in the same area. One piece, “Avey 's Good Luck”, is marked by a stone with I.E. 1769 written on it (MSA 1773). John's father, Henry, also had land (“Scotch Lott”) on Beaver Creek (MSA 1746). As John was the oldest son of Henry, it is possible that his father helped him to get started on his own farm (MSA 17&3a) in the same area. This would also explain why his (Henry's) oldest son only received five acres of "Scotch Lott" in Henry's will (MSA 1763a). The above data allows us to separate John's family from that of Joseph or Jacob. Land records for John will reference “Avey's Delight”, “John's Delight” or “Avey's Good Luck”. Joseph’s or Jacob’s land records will reference “Scotch Lott” as they inherited all but five acres of tha land from Henry (MSA 1763a) and Jacob purchased John's five acres of “Scotch Lott” in 1768 (MSA 1768). By 1771, Jacob had sold all but five acres of “Scotch Lott” (MSA 1768; MSA 1771), so after this date most land transactions referring to this piece of land will be Joseph’s family. As Jacob sold his portion of “Scotch Lott” to Jacob Root (MSA 1768) and Jacob Saltsgaver (MSA 1771), one could follow their sales until you found who they sold to and so on until you had a current owner.

As far as we know, Joseph Avey and Eve transferred to Michael, Samuel, and Daniel part of "Scotch Lott".

We know that “Scotch Lott” was next to both “Mistake” and “Jacob's Lott” (MSA 1771) and “Mistake” was a part of “St. Patrick's Lott” (MSA 1764). “Scotch Lott” was on the south side of Beaver Creek near Jacob Avey's sawmill at the mouth of a run of Beaver Creek (MSA 1768). In a Washington County deed, Peter Newcomer Sr. sold to a Jacob Evey, for $5,500, land on the north side of the turnpike from Boosnboro to Hagerstown, part of “Jacob's Lott”, part of “Mistake” and part of “Scotch Lott” (Wash. Co., Md. 1825). In the 1877 atlas of Washington County, Maryland, there were still Aveys and Newcomers in this area (Fig. 10:33).

1702 – Henry Avey or Ebby was born in 1702. He was a Swiss emigrant from Bern Switzerland to Philadelphia and had close connections with the George French as they were both naturalized the same day and place.

Henry Avey immigrated on 11 Aug 1732 from his hometown of Bern in Switzerland, to Philadelphia, PA, on the ship “Samuel” of London*, from Pennsylvania German Pioneers: A Publication of the Original Lists of Arrivals in the Port of Philadelphia from 1727 to 1808, Vol. I, page 59. His oldest daughter Lisbetha Evy, was listed as age 8 in 1732 from ship records indicating she was born in 1734. Henry Avey died in April 1763 in Washington County, MD, at the age of 61.

George French and Henry Avey were both naturalized on 20 Oct 1747 as foreign Protestants; he was not Roman Catholic but followed principles of the Reformation, Lutherans, Baptists, and Presbyterians, from “Denizations and Naturalizations in the British Colonies in America, 1607-1775”. No other Avey is listed in this document. George French sold livestock in 1772 and is not mentioned in documents past that date, at which time George’s wife has not been mentioned – she may have died or George may never have married. The only other French in this document besides George French is John French, naturalized in Pennsylvania 29-30 May 1772; he was from Colebrookdale township, Berks County (relationship unknown, if any). Jacob Snevely of Switzerland immigrated on the ship “Snow Lowther” on 14 Oct 1731 to Philadelphia from Rotterdam but last from Dover; also on this ship was Johann Conradt Franck**. See http://www.reocities.com/Heartland/Hills/7010/shiplists_pa1731.html#SAMUEL and continuing pages. Henry Avey wrote his will on 2 Mar 1763 in Frederick Co., MD, and d. 25 Apr 1763. Jacob French 1st died ca. 1755.

*Also on this ship on the same date was a man named Christian Frantz, also spelled Christian Frants. Christian Frants Senior was age 47 or born 1685 and Christian Frants Junior was age 26 or born in 1706, very close to the time that Jacob French was born. The childrens’ names of Christian Frantz were Anna, Barbara, Eva, Magdalena, Judith, Veronica, John, Michiel, and Elizabeth, but no Jacob. Some of these names were listed as Frantsin, but the records state that Christian Frants’ wife was Anna; therefore, he was not part of this Chronology.

**Conradt Franck owned land in Albany, NY, in 1761 and used the name Conradt Franck, not French; therefore, he was not part of this Chronology.

French Family

1704 -- A very approximate birth year of Jacob French 1st in the Old Country. He married most probably ca. 1721 as their daughter Louisa French was born ca. 1722 and son George French was born ca. 1723-26, both in Europe. Most probably the French family immigrated between 1728-1738, but we do not know from where nor to which port.

Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Lancaster is the oldest inland city in the United States of America, snuggled along the north and west by the mighty Susquehanna River, and was originally settled in 1718. Lancaster County was established on 10 May 1729. The Snively and French families probably met in Antrim, PA, where a legal document of the French family shows the marriage between John Snively and Louisa (or Levina) French in 1743, and the marriage of Magdalena Snively and Jacob French 2nd in 1751.

The Lancaster County Genealogy website discusses boundary changes, cemeteries, Bible records, etc.

1714 -- From Vicki, Ref. [32]: Jacob Schnebeli/Snively (2nd) immigrated to Lancaster Co., PA, in 1714, with his father Jacob Schnebeli (1st), and lived along the Conestoga River which is a tributary of the Susquehanna River flowing through the center of Lancaster County, PA. This is the land on which he built his house in 1728. Religious disputes drove them to leave their home in Switzerland and immigrate to Pennsylvania. The English associated the Swiss with their Dutch brethren Anabaptists and called them Mennonites. Other ship passenger records show that Jacob Schnebeli returned to Europe to urge other Brethren to come over to Pennsylvania by 1717 overflowing the Skippack and Pequea settlements. By the 1730s a few of these families located along the Conococheague Creek in the Cumberland Valley as did Jacob Schnebeli. The Amish didn’t appear in Lancaster County until 1759; therefore, we know that Jacob French 2nd was not an Amish, see [182]. See website on Mennonites.

The following is from “The Three Earls: an historical sketch, and proceediings of the centennial jubilee held at New Holland, PA, July 4, 1876”, beginning on page 22. The first footnote talks about Pequea Creek and how his Swiss Mennonite Eby family immigrated to Lancaster County, PA, in 1709 – they left Switzerland, they moved to the Palatinate area of Germany. Henry or Heinrich Eby was naturalized with George French in Maryland in 1747. These pages mention more than one hundred names of first settlers, and the surname French is not one of them making me think that perhaps the French family came from Alsace-Loraine in France and simply used the surname French after they immigrated. The Rohrer family came from Markirch, Alsace, and the immigrant, Jacob Rohrer, was born in 1696 and immigrated in 1732. Markirch is the German spelling and Sainte-Marie-aux-Mines is the French word. Alsace was a French province, but a German province before 1697 and between 1871-1919. Anabaptist Mennonites were forced out of Alsace in the 18th century and many went to the Palatine area of Germany.

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The Schnebely family also settled along the Conestoga River. In the footnote above, Martin Kendrick sold land on 28 Feb 1724 that he had bought on 22 Nov 1717. The Kendrick family was also known as Gindrick as the hard sound of the K and G in German are very similar. On 30 Mar 1725, Henry Kendrick administered to Martin Kendrick and John Harr, the widow Barbary, renouncing in favor of brother-in-law Martin Kendrick, in Chester County, PA Wills. Martin Kendrick is still in Pennsylvania in 1783 as he appears in the Freeman’s Journal of Philadelphia, PA, on 23 Jul 1783.

Jonathan Gingrick bought land adjacent to Jacob French 2nd’s land in Antrim, PA, in 1748. Gingerich becomes Kingery: Although the most common early European spelling of the name seems to be Gingerich, today in America there are many variations. The passenger list for the Palatine ship "Adventure Galley", a ship that brought indentured servants to Pennsylvania under William Penn to populize the state, said from Rotterdam to Philadelphia on 2 Oct 1727 and has Johannes Ullerich listed, which is believed to be Johannes Gingerich. Johannes Gingerich began showing up in Lancaster Co PA about 1735 on church records. The PA state archives shows that John Kingry was naturalized as a US citizen in Sep 1743, under the heading “Quakers”. Johannes Gingerich was b. 1679 in Alsace, Canton Bern, Switzerland and d. 1769 in Warwick, Lancaster Co., PA. He began showing up on the Church of the Brethren records in 1735 in Lancaster Co., PA. The name “Gingrick” was not listed in the Taxable List of 1751 and 1752 in Antrim.

Johann Jacob Schnebele (or Snively) moved to Franklin County in the 1730's. He built a cabin on the family homestead. He received a warrant dated March 28, 1743 for 100 acres, and another tract on June 15, 1748.  (Washburn, page 50.)  Jacob French 2nd purchased 48 acres next to Jacob Snively on that same day in June. This land is owned in 2012 by Luke Martin, a Mennonite, as per Vicki [32].

1717 -- From Snively - Snavely by Elizabeth Washburn (sent by Vicki, Ref. [32]), “The Land Office map of Manheim Twp., Lancaster Co, Pa, shows a 400-acre tract of land just west of Conestoga Creek, warranted to Martin Kendrick (Kendig) Nov 22, 1717, and surveyed May 29, 1718; it was patented to John Snevely Oct 4, 1735.....”    “In 1728, Johann Jacob Schnebele, or Snevely, as the name appears in the early Lancaster records, built a substantial home on Kauffman Run (now Landis Run), a tributary of the Conestoga Creek.”  (Washburn, page 41). This is the present home at 2201 Oregon Pike. It is about 4 miles, northeast of Lancaster on route 272.

1719/1720 – John Snively, son of Jacob Snively, was born in Manheim, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, a Dutch populated area of the state, even though it was named after Mannheim, Germany. Because John Snively married Louisa/Levina French in 1743 (no source found), she must have been at least 15 and therefore born between 1720-1728.

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1723 -- George French, born ca. 1723-1726 but not in the U.S. or Britain as he applied for naturalization in 1747, was raised in Antrim, Franklin Co., PA. George first owned land in Maryland in 1747 right after his naturalization, indicating he was probably 21+ years old or born 1726 or before. No one has been able to find the name of George’s wife, but her name may have been Barbary, Evy, or Mary, the names of their first 3 daughters – not sure where I found those children’s names, but the name Barbary has always been predominant in this family. George lived in Frederick County, Maryland, and then to Berkeley County, VA, and then WV (border lines changed) where he became a blacksmith and bought “Old Forge Farm” in 1762 and built a stone house there about 7 miles from “Huckleberry Hall” where his brother Jacob French 2nd resided. At this early time, MD, VA, and WV may have changed borders in the area where he lived.

1727 -- Pennsylvanians became concerned enough about unregulated immigration of these "foreigners" (meaning non-British subjects), that they an act was passed requiring registration and loyalty oaths. From 1727 to 1776 (when the Revolutionary War interrupted immigration) each ship was required to submit a list of its debarkees, who were then required to take and sign (or have signed for them, then make their marks) loyalty oaths at City Hall. Because of this law, the emigrants who came before 1727 needed to be naturalized, which was the case with George French who was naturalized in 1747 along with many neighboring Germans, but in the state of Maryland, not Pennsylvania, where laws could have been different. Those foreigners who were naturalized before 1776 in Maryland contained little information; however, only Protestants were allowed to be naturalized. George’s father, Jacob French 1st, may never have been naturalized or he may have been born in England and was already a British subject. “Colonial Maryland Naturalizations” by Jeffrey A. and Florence L. Wyand, shows George French on page 17.

Copies of these naturalizations were supposed to be sent to the Office of the Commissioners for Trade and Plantations in London or Westminster at the end of every year. Some colonies complied with the law and others did not. The naturalizations that were sent to England will be found in Naturalizations of Foreign Protestants in the American and West Indian Colonies. (See below.) Those that were never sent may be found in colonial records and may be on microfilm through the Family History Library. They will be cataloged under the name of the current state. Naturalization records during the colonial time can help you determine if your ancestor was really from the British Isles.

1727-1729 -- Jacob French 2nd was born about this time, place unknown.

1729 Oct 14 -- Johann Jacob Schnebele/Snively (1st) was born in 1659 in Affoltern am Albis, Canton Zurich, Switzerland, immigrated to the new world in 1714 with his wife and children and settled in Lancaster, PA. He was naturalized in Philadelphia, PA, on 14 October 1729, and died in 1743 at age 84 – this was probably the same year his son John Snively married as his second wife Louisa French.

1731 Oct 14 -- Ship Lowther (Snow) of 1731, leaving from Rotterdam, stopping in Dover, England, and arriving in Philadelphia 14 Oct 1731 with Jacob Snevely. He could have been Jacob Snevely 2nd, but if he were, he probably had gone back and forth between his native country and Pennsylvania, as he was already in Pennsylvania in 1714.

1731 -- From Images of America: Greencastle/Antrim: by Bonnie A. Shockey and Kenneth B. Shockey: “Jacob Snively (a Swiss) was probably the first white settler in Antrim Township. He arrived in 1731 and purchased a total of 1,500 acres of land in 1734 and 1735.” His homestead and that of other settlers became known as the Conococheague Settlement. Vicki, Ref. [32], believes it is safe to say that the Ulster-Scots and the Swiss arrived within days or weeks of each other in Antrim.

1732-1763, Maryland Militia, Muster of Captain John White’s Company, Maryland Militia, for 6 days service, Jacob French. The 6 days indicates that Jacob French was a Mennonite because Mennonites weren’t allowed to serve more than 6 days.

Capt. John White m1. Sarah Leonard before 22 May 1722. John White wrote his will on 4 Sep 1755 and it was probated on 24 Oct 1759 in Frederick County, MD. His father was Peter White and mother was Abigail. He m2. Martha Jones who was the widow of John Stull. After her second marriage, John White died and she married again to Hugh Torrence. Before living in Maryland, John White lived in NJ, and before that, his ancestors lived on Long Island, NY.

1734-1735 -- From Images of America: Greencastle/Antrim: by Boonie A. Shockey and Kenneth B. Shockey: “Jacob Snively was probably the first white settler in Antrim Township, formerly in Cumberland County, now Franklin County, PA. He purchased a total of 1,500 acres of land in 1734 and 1735”. 

Jacob Schnebele’s (Snively) granddaughter Anna eventually inherited the land and house. She married Benjamin Landis, a Swiss, who apparently bought out Anna’s brother’s part of the property. The Landis family were Mennonites as well [75].

1735 Oct 4 -- From Snively - Snavely by Elizabeth Washburn, “The Land Office map of Manheim Twp., Lancaster Co, Pennsylvania, shows a 400-acre tract of land just west of Conestoga Creek, warranted to Martin Kendrick (Kendig) Nov 22, 1717, and surveyed May 29, 1718; it was patented to Johann Jacob Snevely Oct 4, 1735.....”    “In 1728, Johann Jacob Schnebele, or Snevely, as the name appears in the early Lancaster records, built a substantial home on Kauffman Run (now Landis Run), a tributary of the Conestoga Creek.” (Washburn, page 41). This is the home at 2201 Oregon Pike. It is about 4 miles, northeast of Lancaster on route 272. The house was later plastered over with stucco as the sides are today very smooth. The house still has today (2012) the original slate roof, front door, attic, floors, and basement, per Vicki [32]. The house was built at a wagon stop.

From Vicki, Ref. [32] in 2012: The Kauffman Run (now Landis Run), a tributary of the Conestoga Creek, goes behind Jacob Snively’s house in Lancaster, PA, the house he lived in before moving west to Antrim, PA. (He was known as Jacob Snively as he dropped the “John/Johann” from his Christian name Jacob as John/Johann was his Saint’s name.) I visited this house; it is now a Staffing Agency at 2201 Oregon Pike for Tri Starr and includes a parking lot and other buildings. The basement has an arched stone ceiling with two arched windows (maybe more) that let in light. The building is the oldest continually inhabited house in the area. Tri Starr Agency email: Lancaster@tristarrjobs.com.

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1736 Apr 14 -- John Snively (who married Louisa French in 1743) moved to Shady Grove, Antrim Twp., Cumberland Co., now Franklin Co., PA, just east of present Greencastle, with his father, Jacob Snively, shortly before the death of his mother, Anna Newcomer Snively, who died before 14 Apr 1736 when Jacob Snively m2. Barbara Eberle.

1738 -- John French, youngest son of Jacob French 1st, was born about this time. He moved to Chansford/Chanceford, York Co., PA, m. Maria Barbara Schmeiss ca. 1762. John died 25 Dec 1787 in Hagerstown, Washington, MD. Maria Barbara Schmeiss was born in 1741 in Chanceford, York, PA, and died in 1817 in Tell, Huntingdon, PA. They were married ca. 1760 and had children Henry in 1760, Maria Elizabeth in 1765, Peter in 1769, and John in 1772. This may be FFA Chart #129. John French resided in Antrim, Franklin County, PA, in 1814.

1738 Oct 30 – a possible immigration for Jacob French 1st, listed as Jacob Frans, age 34, was on the Palatine ship “Elizabeth” from Rotterdam (Holland), to Cowes (England), then to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, with Capt. George Hodgson. This is only a hypothetical assumption by Mara French and has in no way been proven. Here are my reasons for interpreting Jacob’s immigration. Note that the Jacob Frans who married Maria Baszier in Holland in 1777 and who lived in Kingston, NY, is not the same Jacob Frans who immigrated in 1738, as they came later. See [132]. 

Š      The name “French” is a British name, not a German name, which would be Französisch, and not a French name, which would be Franćais, and in the Netherlands it would be Frans. There was definitely a reason Jacob received the name French. It could be because he lived in France, but many other immigrants were also born in France and didn’t receive this surname. It could have been the anglization of the name Frantz or Franz after immigration, but that surname continues in other locations in the New World, which are not the same as Jacob French, plus the Frantz DNA does not match with the surname French of DNA Test Group 4. Or, it could be the American word for the Dutch word Frans, which is translated in English to the name “French”. This latter reason seems the most plausible. However, the DNA for Jakob Ammann and Jacob French match precisely. See http://www.frenchfamilyassoc.com/FFA/CHARTS/Chart195/Ammann.htm.

Š      The name “French” in the Dutch language is “Frans”, and that name does appear in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and the main emigrant was Jacob Frans in 1738; women and children are listed only by number, and Jacob would have had a wife and at least 3 children (Levina, George, Jacob). From “Pennsylvania German Pioneers: A Publication of the Original Lists of Arrivals in the Port of Philadelphia from 1727 to 1808, edited by William John Hinke. We are unable to find Jacob French’s whereabouts between 1738 and 1747 = 9 years, so one might assume his name was changed from Frans to French, as the name Frans disappears in Pennsylvania.

Š      If Jacob Frans were the father of these 3 children, the 3 children would have also been listed if they were 21 years of age or older, and they are not listed, which means they were all born after 1717.

Š      Jacob Frans took the Oath of Allegiance as he arrived in Pennsylvania in 1738. Levina did not need to become naturalized as her husband was naturalized and women didn’t have advantages at that time anyway. George was naturalized in 1747 in Maryland. Son Jacob was living in Pennsylvania in 1748 and took the Oath of Allegiance when he was 21 according to Pennsylvanian laws as each state had different laws – we cannot find this document if it exists or not.

Š      After Jacob Schnebele’s (2nd) death on August 24, 1766 at age 72 leaving 17 children, the executors of the estate, sons John Snively (who was married to Louisa French) and Henry Snively (eldest son from Jacob Schnebele’s second marriage) made a detailed inventory of his personal property. Among the books listed were three large “Dutch Bibles”, a “Dutch Testament”, and four “Books of Hymns and Psalms”, Ref. [66], page 87. Because the Snively family were Swiss and spoke German, that would leave only the French family who could have made use of the Dutch language, and would therefore be from Holland.

Š      Jacob Frans is listed in the 1738 Pennsylvania Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA. John Christian Frans appears in the 1740 Pennsylvania Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA.

Š      Jacob Frans did not need to be naturalized because he was an adult at his arrival in 1738 and it was then that he took the Oath of Allegiance, he was living in Pennsylvania and the later 1740 Naturalization Law of Maryland did not affect him. Many of the men’s names on the ship Elizabeth have an (X) after them meaning that they signed their name with an X. Jacob is the only one who has a (J) after his name. Looking at the other names where (V) and (K) and (H) appear, it is obvious that those men signed their initial, as Jacob did. These men subscribed the oaths of the government upon arrival. From http://www.olivetreegenealogy.com/ships/pal_eliz1738.shtml. In addition, this website shows a detailed list of the Palatines who were on the ship Elizabeth; here his name is spelled Jacob Frantz (and in other source, Frans) which definitely indicates a spelling by pronunciation.

Š      The name Frans does not appear again in Pennsylvania until 1786 with an absence of 48 years – no doubt there would have been a record on a “Jacob Frans” within 48 years if he hadn’t changed his name to French, which could mean according to my hypothesis that the name was Anglicized from Frans to French immediately when he arrived on the ship in 1738. The name “Jacob Frans” appears in Mulberry Ward, Philadephia, in 1786 on the Tax and Exoneration List, paying tax on his house and vacant lot, 3 horses, 1 cow, 2 chairs, 1 stage wagon, and his occupation amounting to £729. The name Jacob Frans does not appear on ancestry.com between 1738 and 1786. “A” George Frans in South Ward, Philadelphia in 1779, and “a” Peter Frans in Towamensing, PA, in 1788 are also listed.

Š      Jacob Frans’ first child, Levina, received that Dutch name, and her name was Anglicized to Louisa when they reached Philadelphia. However, Louisa’s husband John Snively reverts back to calling her Levina in his will of 1791. She married in 1743 date shows that the family arrived before that date; therefore, the possibility of 1738 exists. No record of this French family appears in Pennsylvania before 1743 when Louisa French marries. Jacob Frans did on this day, 30 Oct 1738, take and subscribe the oaths to the government.

Š      The ship Robert and Alice departed from Rotterdam, Holland, to Philadelphia on 11 Sep 1738 and lists “a” Jacob Frans. Most immigrants were German Palatines. Also on this ship were Johann Gottfried Rohrer and Johannes Rohrer. Here his name is also listed as Jacob Frantz. See http://files.usgwarchives.net/pa/1pa/ships/1738robalice01.txt.

Š      From “Births in Holland, 1706-1710”, http://mailgroep.seniorweb.nl/gen/Dopen%20Gouda%20Index%201706-1710.pdf: Jacob Frans, born 5 Sep 1706 to Matijs Frans and Catharyna van der Vloet. They had another child Niesie born 23 Nov 1708. There are 31 hits for the name Frans. There’s a Levyna Frans and Jan Gibon/Gybon who had son Pieter on 12 Dec 1706 in Gouda, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands. In another section their names are spelled Jan Gybon and Levina Frans in which another unnamed child was born. She is the only Levina in this entire file. Jacob and Levina Frans are together. Because of this early Levina, they probably named their daughter Levina, the one who married John Snively. Peter is spelled Pieter. Jacob is spelled Jacob or Jacobus or Jakob. The city of Gouda is almost next to Rotterdam where the ship Elizabeth left from to arrive in Philadelphia on 30 Oct 1738. If this scenario is proven truthful, another generation back has been found to Matijs Frans and his wife Catharyna van der Vloet. I’ve seen the name spelled Matthijs. Mattijs Frans died on 29 Nov 1751 in Bergen op Zoom, Noord-Brabant, Nederland. If Jacob Frans were born on 5 Sep 1706, he would have been 32 when he immigrated, and not 34 as indicated, but the calculation seems rather close. Perhaps the 5 Sep 1706 date was a baptismal date.

Does the following baptismal record indicate the child received the mother’s surname as she was not married?

Š      George French, son of Jacob 1st, was probably the oldest son. He moved to Maryland (did he ever live in Pennsylvania?) and was affected by the 1740 Naturalization Laws of Maryland. He needed to be in the county for 7 years before he could become naturalized; therefore, his naturalization in 1747 shows that the family immigrated before 1740. The possibility of an 1738 immigration exists. George needed to be naturalized before he could marry for the first time and before he could own land in Maryland. He bought land in 1748 and probably married that year, but no records have been found regarding a marriage. He needed to be 21 by 1747, which makes his birthdate 1726 or before.

Š      The Lancaster, PA, Mennonite Vital Records, 1750-1940, lists several hundred members of the Snavely and Snively families. The Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society typed on index cards from original data (not from computer or internet data), listing an estimated 800,000 Lancaster County Mennonites and Members of related groups. Among the 800,000 Lancaster County Mennonites and members of related groups (I suppose this means Anabaptists), the French family is NOT listed at all. But we know that they were in Lancaster County as Louisa French is listed as a spouse, but not as a member of the Mennonites in the “F” section — the name French is not there al all. This further proves that the French family could have been Quakers or Amish. 

Š      Jacob Frans with an estimated age of 34 and birth year of about 1704 on the Elizabeth immigration list of 1738 indicates he was the correct age to have children in the 1720s.

Š      Jacob French 1st’s son, Jacob 2nd was first mentioned in Maryland in 1758 in the French and Indian War for 6 days, and also in 1762 when he bought “Huckleberry Hall”. He perhaps became naturalized or took the oath of Allegiance in Pennsylvania.

Description: Description: JacobFranz

Only men are listed on the ship list, no women and no children. If this is the Jacob French 1st of this line, his children would have been all under 21 years of age or born after 1717. It lists the 43 men aboard the ship, but just indicates that there were 21 women and 6 children, no names given. In the 18th century the legal requirement that a person be of age, that is an adult, he or she must have reached his 21st birthday. This was the requirement for persons to sell real estate, to sue in one’s own name in a court of law, to sign a bond or promissory note, and to marry for the first time. If either of the parties to be married was not of age, the consent of a parent or guardian was necessary. It was to be in writing before two witnesses, unless it was sworn to before the clerk of the county court.

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18th Century Philadelphia Courthouse where most passengers were taken to swear their loyalty to the Crown, that is, if they were British.

The following list is of the 43 men on board the Palatine ship “Elizabeth” from Rotterdam (Holland), to Cowes (England), then arriving in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, with Capt. George Hodgson on 30 Oct 1738. The list shows only men; no women or children. Comments in brackets after the ages are from Mara French. The only problem with this Jacob Frans perhaps being the Jacob French of this line is that none of the other names on this ship related to him after immigration.

Lodwick Nicholas 34 – [50 acres on 13 Sep 1748 in Lancaster, PA]
Jacob Shilkneght 38
George Arnoldt 34
Johannes Mayer 27
Philip Jacob Leyderberger 34
Daniel Heyning 30
Christian Egan 17 – [bapt. 19 Nov 1716 at St. Nicholas Within, Dublin, Ireland]
Johannes Honether 36
Johannes Mester 43
Tobias Swartz 26
Bernard Wainmaker 40
Hans Jacob Kesler 25
Mathias Bartholomew 20 – [moved to Middletown, Frederick Co., MD; had land in Bedford Co, PA, had a will which is online at ancestry.com under the name Bartholomew Booher/Bucher. He was perhaps from Bas-Rhin, France].
Conrath Nydagh 19
Nicholas Hodele 36
Johannes Harley 25
Hans George Fritz 30
Conradt Kenner 22
Hans Georg Petery 33
Laurentz Rous 23
Geo. Adam Mayer 19
Philip Besa 16
John Lodwick Potts 29 – [several listings born in England]
Henry Keaghler 28
Matheas Poriger 39
Jacob Frans 34 – [not verified to be the Jacob French of this line]
Jacob Kern 18 – [member of the Egypt Reformed Church in Egypt, Lehigh Co., PA].
Johannes Yeites 21
Hans Jacob Bener 38
Conradt Fogleman 35
Andreas Rodenhauser 34 – [wrote “nach Psylv” “Ist ins Neue Land” which is German for “Going to Pennsylvania” “It is in a New Land”]
Hans Adam Kinsler 25
Mathias Chris 50
Christian Lesch 41
Hans Geo. Windlinger 32 – [sick onboard ship, wrote will 2 Mar 1738, proven 19 Mar 1738, Newhanover township, PA, wife Mary, children Mary, Eve, Susanna, Hannah. This date was no doubt the Old Calendar, which today would have been 1739.]
Michl Deyne 29
Martin Dageaback 23
Ulrich Rodobush 24
Mathys Deolar 31
Christian Creytz 26
Elias Berniger 24
Lodowick Fansler – [b. ca. 1714]
Geo. Adam Yeagold

“Names of Foreigners Who Took the Oath of Allegiance to the Province and State of Pennsylvania, 1727-1775” also lists Jacob Frans as immigrating on the ship “Robert and Alice” from Rotterdam, Holland on 11 Sep 1738. This ship left from the same port to the same port less than 2 months earlier. Looking at both ship lists, no single name stands out as being connected with the French family later on in Pennsylvania.

1739 -- Jacob Snively was naturalized in Philadelphia in 1739 and died at the age of eighty-four. His descendants intermarried with the Strite, Miller, Garver, Hoffman, French, and other families of the Leitersburg District, Pennsylvania.

1739 -- Jacob Rohrer, father of John Rohrer, settled on Antitiem Creek lands in 1739. Jacob Rohrer was naturalized with George French in 1747 in Maryland, but we don’t know if he was Jacob Rohrer Sr. or Jr.

1740 -- From Deb, Ref. [1]: “After 1740, the procedure changed [for naturalizations]. The 1740 Act of Parliament [13 George II, c.7] was entitled “An Act for Naturalizing such foreign Protestants, and others therein mentioned, as are settled or shall settle in any of His Majesty's Colonies in America.” It allowed an immigrant who had lived seven years in a colony to become naturalized by fulfilling certain requirements (such as taking the oaths and producing a certificate that he had taken the Sacrament) in the colony of residence. His naturalization applied in England as well as in all of the colonies. The payment for the naturalization under this act was two shillings. Large numbers of immigrants (excluding Catholics) became naturalized under this act.”

The British Parliament, in 1740, passed a Naturalization Act through which alien colonists could obtain the rights of natural-born subjects of Great Britain. Great Britain includes four countries: England, Scotland, Northern Ireland, and Wales, . . but, it does not include Ireland (south). Therefore, if you were an emigrant from Ireland, you needed to take the Oath of Allegiance. Before 1740, the practice of Denization at English Common Law was practiced: denization occurred by a grant of letters patent, an exercise of the royal prerogative. Denizens paid a fee and took an oath of allegiance to the crown. A denizen is a kind of middle state, between an alien and a natural-born subject, and partakes of both. That person would have no political rights, could not be a member of parliament, and could not hold an office; however, he could purchase property, but he could not inherit property. This might explain why no family member of Jacob French 1st was able to inherit his property in Antrim in 1755 when he died; therefore, the family moved to Maryland.

For an alien to become naturalized by the 1740 Naturalization Act in Pennsylvanina, he first had to reside in the colonies for seven years (not being absent for more than two months at any one time). He then had to produce in Court a certificate showing he had taken the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper in some Protestant or Reformed Congregation in the Province of Pennsylvania within three months before the said Court, take and subscribe specified Oaths, and make and repeat a specified Declaration prescribed by the act. Special provision was made for an Affirmation in place of the Oaths to be made by Quakers, and both Quakers and Jews were exempted from the obligation of receiving the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper. The act did not cover religious groups such as the Mennonites, Moravians, Quakers, and Jews, who received exemptions as being non-Protestant. In Pennsylvanina this problem was met by an Act of Assembly passed 3 Feb. 1742-3 for naturalizing “such Foreign Protestants as are settled or shall settle within this Province who, not being of the People called Quakers, do conscientiously refuse the taking of any Oath.” In 1747 the British Parliament passed a similar act [99].

1742 – Naturalization of Jacob “Freich” of Nockamixon, Bucks County, PA, and including names of other foreigners of the people called Quakers as are settled or shall settle in any of his Majestry’s Colonies in America, and of an Act of General Assembly of the Province of Pennsylvania, made in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and forty-two. From “Persons Naturalized in the Province of Pennsylvania, 1740-1773.”, Baltimore, MD, Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997. Was Jacob of Nockamixon the same man as Jacob of Antrim?

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Furthermore, ancestry.com lists Jacob Freich in the U.S. Naturalization Records Indexes, in the Western District of Pennsylvania, U.S. District Court, showing No. and Page of document. Note that this record is not in the German Script. After a very few occurences of the name Freich appear early on in the U.S., it disappears; perhaps it could have been changed to French.

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“A” Jacob Freich is listed in the Württemberg, Germany, Lutheran Baptisms, Marriages, and Burials, 1500-1985 as born 1669, died 1719 at age 50, buried 19 Aug 1719 in Grossheppach, Württemberg (Baden-Württemberg), Germany, recorded at the Evangelisches Landeskirchenamt, Stuttgart, Germany. His saint’s name was Hans, as his marriage record states Hans Jacob Freich married Anna Magdalena Leonhardt on 9 Feb 1697 in Boll, Göppingen u. Oa, Württemberg (Baden-Württemberg), Germany. However, “a” Johann Jacob Freich was born 14 Jan 1752 in Oppenweiler, Württemberg (Baden-Württemberg), Germany, after the immigration record above. Furthermore, a son named Joseph Ludwig Freich was born to Wolfgang Jacob Freich and Sybilla Länberin in 1740 in Württemberg, Germany, listed as Lutheran, and recorded at the Evangelisches Landeskirchenamt, Stuttgart, Germany. The name Freich sounds as Fry-ch. No DNA test has been taken for the surname Freich as of Feb 2016.

1743 -- Johann Jacob Schnebele/Snively (1st) died in 1743 at the age of 84. He was born in Affoltern am Albis, Canton Zurich, Switzerland, immigrated to the new world in 1714 with his wife and children and settled in Lancaster, PA. He was naturalized in Philadelphia, PA, on 14 October 1729.

Jacob Schnebele’s son John Schnebely married Louisa (Levina) French in 1743. He changed his name to Snavely, and the next generation changed it to Snively. He was one of the executors of his father’s estate in Antrim Twp., PA, in 1766, and at the time John was married to Louisa (Levina) French. John Snively was b. 1720 and Louisa (Levina) French was b. ca. 1722, and was probably the first of Jacob French 1st’s children. They had children Jacob, John, Michael, Anna, Mary, Catherine, Christiana, Barbara, Magdelena, Levinia, Elizabeth, Hannah. John Schnebely and his wife Louisa and family moved from Antrim, Pennsylvania to Frederick County, Maryland (which became Washington County, Maryland) about 1762, where John Snavely died in 1791; some of his children moved on to Ohio.

Jacob Snavely, b. 1745 and died in 1831, married Amanda Shirley in 1771, and had children John, George, Amanda, Hannah, Abraham, and Mary.

John Snavely married Mary Miller and had children Leah, Eliza, Rhoda, Thomas, Andrew, Lewis, Samuel, Silas, John.

Anna Snavely, b. 29 Jul 1755.

Michael Snavely, b. 25 Jan 1757.

Mary Snavely

Catherine Snavely

Christiana Snavely

Barbara Snavely married William Jackson in Lancaster, Orange Co.?, Ohio, and had children Ezra, John, Mary who m. Joseph Sheetz, Nancy who m. Daniel Swayne, Thomas who m. Shellenberger, William, and Elizabeth.

Magdelena Snavely, born 1 Jan 1766 in PA, m. Johannes Miller, d. 1802 per headsone of John Miller, Elder.

Levinia Snavely

Elizabeth Snavely

Hannah Snavely

See Snively Genealogy and Schneebeli Genealogy.

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The data above is from https://www.gengophers.com/book.html#/book/35958?page=47&given=jacob&exactGiven=false&surname=french&exactSurname=false&place=Maryland,%20United%20States&date=1740-1790&startDate=1740&endDate=1790&exactRels=false.

1744 -- Will of John Miller witnessed by John Snevely Sr., living in Manheim, PA, in 1744 before John Snevely bought land in Antrim in 1748. Most of this family were Mennonites, if not all of them.

Will of John Miller
Lancaster County Courthouse, Lancaster, PA
ABSTRACT
A-1-98
signed 11 Mar 1744/1745
probate 21 Jun 1745
"taylor"
sister Margret, wife of Christian Sensenick of "Erltown"
brother Adam in High Germany
"to the poor of those people called Mennonites in county Lancaster"
exec: John Snevely Sr of Manheim
    Daniel Eshleman of Hempfield Twp

witnesses:
    Andrew Hirsha
    Jacob Snebeli
    George Honey

1746 Mar 19 – Henry Avey acquired 202 acres of land called “Scotch Lott and Resurvey” in Western Maryland in what is now Washington County, MD, from John Davis. Note that Washington County was created on September 06, 1776 from Frederick County. On March 19, 1746, he had it patented with a resurvey to include two more acres for a total of 202 acres.  In Henry's will he divides this land among his three sons, John, Joseph and Jacob. The Administration Accounts of Henry Ebby's estate located at the Maryland State Archives at Annapolis, Maryland, shows that he had children: Catharine, John, Margaret, Jacob, Barbara, Mary, Fononya, Joseph, and Ann. Apparently daughter Lisabeth is not mentioned either because she had married or died.

http://interactive.ancestry.com/7662/7662-HistWestMD-1882-v2-0211/211?backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3fgst%3d-6&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnSearchResults&rc=1521,137,1783,176;777,1061,856,1093;523,1198,575,1225;1739,1360,1819,1393;1742,1523,1824,1556;806,2175,885,2206;901,2177,961,2209;808,2227,886,2260;902,2229,961,2262#?imageId=7662-HistWestMD-1882-v2-0212

1746 May 30, Philadelphia, PA, John Snively was living in Lancaster County, PA.

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George French’s Naturalization and Land Deeds

1747 Oct 20 -- George French, was naturalized in Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, with a group of Mennonites from Washington County, MD, to “petition for naturalization”, indicating that the family was not from Great British, but most likely German or Dutch or Irish. These men traveled either by foot or wagon to Annapolis, but they did not remain there; they returned to Washington County, MD*. These men had to live in the country for 7 years before they could be naturalized [170].

* This fact is only to separate this line from George French of FFA Chart #166 who remained in the Annapolis/Baltimore area.

Described in the court records as “being of the People called Quakers” they asked to affirm their allegiance to the British monarch. The nine men were all Germans and in all likelihood were Mennonites. The judge, no doubt unconcerned about the niceties of sectarian distinctions, associated them with the Quakers because of the common testimony against swearing oaths, but they might not have all been Quakers. Also, it would have been convenient to do so in a legal sense, since Quakers had the privilege under English law to affirm rather than to swear. Most of them were Mennonites or Quakers from Germany, Switzerland, France, or Holland. Provencial Court Judgements, Liber EI, 10: 657  (pg 71).

From “Colonial Maryland Naturalizations” by Jeffrey A. Wyand and Florence L. Wyand, Annapolis, April 1975. Note that Peter Hoofman was from Holland and Christian Kemp was from Scotland. Gilbert Kemp wrote his will on 24 Jun 1791 in Frederick County, Maryland. Henry Avey (probably Jr.) was in the 1790 census of Upper Anietam Hundred, Washington County, Maryland. The names are spelled slightly different on this document.

Description: naturalization

Note that most of these men were born early in the 18th century. There was a Georg Ammann born 4 Aug 1694 in Evangelisch, Rottenacker, Donaukreis, Wuerttemberg, son of Hans and Barbara Ammann, shown in index format on ancestry.com. The Ammann/Hamman family and this French family share the same DNA.

Henry Avey -- Henry Avey was b. ca. 1702 in Switzerland, wrote his will on 2 Mar 1763 in Frederick Co., MD, and d. 25 Apr 1763. Andrew Eavey recorded 25 June, 1770...between Jacob French 2nd of Frederick County, for £150 sells a tract of land part of Huckleberry Hall...signed Jacob French in German script..... Magdalena, wife of Jacob French 2nd relinquished dower rights, which means her name was not on the deed plus her husband was not naturalized or she would not have to sell the land. (FCMD Land Records, Liber N p 29). See details at Avey Family.

Jacob Stull – he lived in Leitersburg near Joseph Wolgamot’s mill. Name may have been spelled Wohlgemut as there was a Joseph Wohlgemuth who immigrated on the ship Harle on 1 Sep 1736 with Christian Snively. Joseph Wolgamot was also naturalized at this time.

Jacob Miller -- Georg Miller, 1710 Jacob Miller, 1719 Nicholas Miller, 1719 Felix Miller. They came over in the ship James Goodwill, David Crocket, Captain, from Rotterdam, and landed at Philadelphia, Pa., September 29th, A. D. 1727. Those from the Miller family who were on this ship were Jürgen Miller, Christian Miller, John Miller, Joseph Miller, and Hans Miller. Various French women married Miller men. Jacob Miller is listed as a surety for the death record of Walter Dodson on 16 Jun 1736 of Charles County, Maryland (not the same county as George French); he had to be at least 21 years of age or born 1715 or before.

Lodowick Miller – born ca. 1724, died ca. 1792, m. Barbara.

Martain Keisner – his name was probably erroneously written and could have been Martin Reisner.

Isaac Simmons -- Isaac Simon’s widow Feronica bought four small lots totaling 98 acres from George French. Over the next ten years as her sons reached maturity she distributed the land to them. “An” Isaac Simmons made his will 22 Jun 1733 in Anne Arundel, MD, probated 10 Jun 1741, death year ca 1741, father was Abraham. He gave to his brothers Samuel, Abraham, Benjamin, and to sisters Sarah, Martha, Elianor who was married to Fisher, and to kinsman Isaac. Isaac’s widow Feronica spells her name with an “F” but it is really Veronica, a very popular German name. Here we say “V”olks”w”agen, but in Germany it is Folksvagen. They pronounce a “V” like an “F” and a “W” like a “V”. The word actually means a Folk’s wagon. So, we might look for the name Vrench or Vranch or Veransch or something similar. Those names look a lot more German than “French”. The same “W” and “V” should be considered with the following surname Wolgamot.

Joseph Wolgamot – or Vulgamot, b. ca. 1716 in Fehraltorf, Zurich, Switzerland, and lived in Frederick, Maryland where his daughter was born ca. 1744, d. 25 Dec 1775, was a farmer with 520 acres and a miller in Hagerstown, Maryland. The mill is now an inn: “The Old Mill”. He immigrated to Philadelphia on 1 Sep 1736 from Rotterdam, Holland, on the ship “Harle”. See http://www.shoreheritage.com/quick/indiI581.html or http://www.olivetreegenealogy.com/ships/palship24.shtml. From Deb, Ref. [1]: From the list of men above naturalized with George French -- along with Joseph Wolgamot (aka Vulgamot) on the Palatine ship Harle in 1736, there was also "Jonadan Heger" on the same voyage. The ship left from Rotterdam to Cowes to London to Philadelphia and 53 men were named Jacob. Name may have been spelled Wohlgemut as there was a Joseph Wohlgemuth who immigrated on the ship Harle on 1 Sep 1736 with Christian Snively.

Jacob Rohrer – Rohrerstown or Rohrersville was a village located 3 miles east of Lancaster, PA. Other villages were Cavetown, Leitersburg, Chewsville, Sandy Hook, and Morganville. John Rohrer, son of Jacob Rohrer, was one of the first Mennonists to return to the valley in Pennsylvania from Maryland in 1757 after people fled in 1755 because of the dangerous conditions related to the French and Indian War (1754-1763). John Jacob Rohrer purchased “Warm Indian”, a 500-acre tract from George French. John Jacob Rohrer was born in 1696, having lived in Sainte-Marie-aux-Mines, Alsace, France, exactly the place and time when Jakob Ammann lived there; Jacob Rohrer and died in 1771 in Lancaster County, PA. He had owned “Penny Hill”, 320 acres of land in Washington County, MD. John Rohrer may have married Mary Groff. See details at Rohrer Family.

Andrew Hoover – Born Andreas Huber (name anglocized) 23 Jan 1722/23 in Ellerstadt, Bad Durkheim, Germany, married in 1744 in York, PA, died 1794 in Back Creek, Uwharrie, Randolph County, North Carolina, the last son of 9 children of Gregor Jonas Huber and Anna Maria Kreutzer. He was a Mennonite as per the “History of Leitersburg District, Washington County, MD. He was buried near the Uwharrie River in the Hoover Cemetery with 23 others. He married at the legal age of 21 Anna Margaretha Pfautz who was also born in Germany, and had 13 children. He arrived in Pennsylvania in 1738 at the age of 16. His father Gregor was born 6 Jul 1668 in Oberkulm, Switzerland and died in Bad Durkheim, Germany. In 1772 Andrew travelled with his family by oxcart down the Great Wagon Road to settle near the Uwharrie River, Randolph County which became Rowan/Orange County, NC. Only two of his children remained in NC, and the others moved to OH, IN, and IA. He was an ancestor of 31st President Herbert Hoover.

Valentine Groff – Andrew Groff was naturalized in Lancaster Co., PA, on 15 Sep 1751. Valentine may be the one listed below as “Felta Gratt” who is a Quaker.

Jonathan Isagar -- This appears to be Jonathan Hagar afterwhich Hagerstown, MD was named. From Wikipedia – “In 1739, Jonathan Hager, a German immigrant from Pennsylvania and a volunteer Captain of Scouts, purchased 200 acres (81 ha) of land in the great Appalachian Valley between the Blue Ridge and Allegheny Mountains in Maryland and called it “Hager’s Fancy”. In 1762, Hager officially founded the town of Elizabethtown, which he named after his wife, Elizabeth Kershner. Fourteen years later, Jonathan Hager became known as the “Father of Washington County” after his efforts helped Hagerstown become the county seat of newly created Washington County which Hager also helped create from neighboring Frederick County, Maryland.”

From Vicki, Ref. [32]: Along with Jacob Schnebele across the line in Maryland – spitting distance -- these nine men probably made up the congregation of Mennonists in the Conococheague, which Morgan Edwards said had been organized in 1743, Ref. [66], page 70. According to a historian we met in Carlisle, one didn’t pledge, affirm, or take an oath of allegiance to the British king if they were English or Ulster Scot, because you were basically traveling “in country”. You were already a subject of the king.

Washington County, Maryland, 1841.
Note Little Antietam Creek to the right of Antietam Creek.

1747-1776 – Various listings of French land do not match exactly. Here is the listing from “Settlers of Maryland, 1679-1783”, which shows at least 2 different French families. The families not from this line are Ariana, Edmund, George of Baltimore, George son the Thomas, Michael, Thomas of Annapolis, and Zerubabel of Kent.

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1747 – From Deb [1]. I doubt that the authors of Building on the Gospel Foundation... would have seen the research done by Rebecca Freeborg. Their book is well-documented and it's very focused on Mennonites of Franklin County, PA and Washington County, MD. Their statement, on p. 70, says: "At the same time other Germans continued to settle along both sides of the Antietam. One German settler, George French (or Frantz) was likely Mennonist." The statement appears to be related his purchase of "George's Venture" and "George's Mistake" but doesn't say why they give us the 2 versions of George's surname. The authors of this book regularly refer to Maryland land records from the state archives.

1747-1790 – Land owned by George French. See LandPatentOwnersWashCo1730-1830.pdf. George must have bought the first listed land immediately after he was naturalized.

50 acres, 1747, George’s Venture
10 acres, 1747, Mistake
100 acres, 1752, Sly Fox
1742 acres, 1755, Resurvey on George’s Mistake
58 acres, 1759, French’s Lott
42 acres, 1759, Sly Fox
50 acres, 1760, Add. To Sly Fox
50 acres, 1760, Waggoner’s Fancy
50 acres, 1761, Out Lot
190 acres, 1763, Burkett’s Folly
456 acres, 1775, George’s Adventure – George died ca. 1772 – this George may be the George French from FFA Chart #166.
93 acres, 1790, Homony Rock – George died ca. 1772 – this George may be the George French from FFA Chart #166.

George French, son the Jacob French 1st, was likely a Mennonite. In December 1747, he patented two tracts, “George’s Venture” and “Mistake” about a mile or so down the White Hall Rd. south of Chewsville in Washington Co., MD [162]. These were just north east of Jacob Rohrer’s land, who was naturalized with George. We are unsure if and when his father Jacob was naturalized, as he had to have been naturalized to buy land; therefore, he probably did not buy land (need to consider that all land bought by Jacob French were bought by Jacob French 2nd.

During the next 20 years, the Frederick County deed books document a series of land transactions between the French and the Rohrer family. George French, the son the Jacob French 1st, was granted 1742 acres of land in the Chewsville area in 1755, per Vicki, called “Resurvey on George’s Mistake”, Ref. [32]. The first deed mentioned in 1747 would mean that George French had to be born before 1726 as he had to be 21 years of age to own land.

In Dec 1747 George French patented two tracts of 50 acres called “George’s Venture, and the Barrens*” near Antietam Cr., next resurvey on Stoney Corner in Maryland. The Antietam Creek is a tributary of the Potomac River. He also bought 10 acres called “Mistake” next to the Barrens. These were just northeast of Jacob Rohrer’s land. Coldham 3:28; Tracey s.v. “George’s Venture”, “The Barrens”, Resurvey on “George’s Mistake”, and “Mistake” for 1462 acres.  (pg 70). See LandPatentOwnersWashCo1730-1830.pdf.

*The Indians hunted the Cumberland Valley and burned areas to make hunting easier. These lands were called “Barrens” and went to the first settlers as they were easier to clear so you could begin to farm [74].

The middle bridge over Antietam Creek, Sep. 1862, in Franklin Co., PA, 41.7 miles long, a tributary of the Potomac River, also in Maryland. The bridge is between Keedysville and Sharpsburg during the Civil War. The Burnside Bridge in 2011 is below and in Washington County, MD.

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George French was naturalized in 1747 in Maryland, therefore not a British subject. At that time he brought witnesses with him. These people were not like witnesses to a marriage; they had to have known your ancestor for a long time and be able to testify to his moral character. They were almost always close friends or relatives. He was naturalized with his German neighbors who were mostly Mennonites. Most men with the surname French married women from Germany or Switzerland, and they lived in German communities. Mennonites were not allowed to fight in the French and Indian War for more than 6 days. Were the French among these people? Related surnames from Germany who married a French were: Ersom, Sturman/Sterman, Schmeiss/Smice/Smise/Smize, Ruhl/Rule/Rühl, Houser/Hauser, Kountz, and Hartman, Sheets/Sheetz, Trobaugh.

3 Types of Colonial Naturalization

Denization--A type of naturalization used to obtain land.  You could buy and sell land, but could not hold public office. There were no political privileges associated with denization.

Oath of Allegiance--This type of naturalization during the colonial period was used to renounce all former country loyalties.  This gave the immigrant full privileges, including voting and holding public office.

Collective citizenship--This naturalization process was used to naturalize a group of people without using documents.  Collective naturalization happened when the United States became a country in 1776 and all those living in the country (except Native Americans and African Americans) were collectively and automatically made US citizens.

George French, son of Jacob French 1st, acquired land in Pennsylvania in 1747, and by law he must have been 21. That would make his birth date 1726 or before and that he may have been the first son and the only son born overseas, and therefore, the only one who was naturalized as we cannot find naturalization records for his siblings. That could also establish the immigration date and the birth dates of his siblings, and the birth date of his father (1705 or before), supposing that the age of 21 to get married was the same in Germany at that time. Assuming that George was born ca. 1726 overseas and that the family immigrated to Pennsylvania ca. 1727/28, his siblings would have been born in Pennsylvania after 1728. George also needed to have lived in the New Colony for 5-7 years before applying for naturalization; therefore, he immigrated before 1740. See http://www.britishislesdna.com/Immigration/US_naturalization.htm.
The “Passenger and Immigration Lists Index” on ancestry.com shows George French in 1747 in Maryland, from data derived from return-forms connected with the naturalization of “Foreign Protestants”, papers that were sent from the Colonies to the Lords’ Commissioners for Trade and Planations. Note that this may be the George French from FFA Chart #166; we need more research.

1747 Dec 1 George French acquired 50 acres of land in Western Maryland called “George’s Venture”, near Antietam Cr. next resurvey on Stoney Corner. He also bought “Mistake”, 10 acres, next “Barrons” which was 100 acres.

1747-1776 George French bought land beginning at age 21 or afterwards; therefore, this George must have been born ca. 1726 or before. We are unsure if this list is all the same George French or two different men named George French. For example, the George French who owned land in Baltimore is definitely George French from FFA Chart #166, in that his tract of land of 714 acres named “Vale” was added to by his son, who bought 913 more acres called “Vale”. We do not believe that Chart #195 ever lived or owned land in Baltimore County. However, both men named George French from FFA Chart #195 (non-British) and from FFA Chart #166 (British) owned land in Frederick Co., MD. The original land for Frederick Co. was formed in 1748 from Prince George’s Co. Then in 1776, Frederick Co. was partially divided into 3 smaller sections: Montgomery, Washington, and Frederick Counties. FFA Chart #195 resided in Montgomery Co., and FFA Chart #166 resided in Washington Co., which were both originally Frederick Co. before 1776, so that is where the confusion lies in trying to differentiate land deeds of these two men with the same name, George French. George French of this line was never in Baltimore (Bal); those lands were bought by George French of FFA Chart #166.

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View this list on this website at LandPatentOwnersWashCo1730-1830.pdf. Other surnames on this list that have a connection to this French family are: Daniel Dulaney, James Davis, John Miller, Henry and John Schnebley, Henry and Jacob and John Saveley, Henry and John Snively (these names could have been the same persons but with different spellings).

It also shows that the Henry, Jacob, Michael, and John Funk family are not connected to the French family (not a misspelling of French), and that their lands are in other areas of Washington Co., MD. Furthermore, the name Michael does not appear in the French family; however, this Michael Funk also has a connection with Daniel Dulaney.

Some other idiosyncrasies found in this list, after searching the entire file for the word “French”, I find that David Funck had an alternative name as David French, and that the land he owned as David Funck was “Lucky Stripe” in 1789 and “Rockey Stripe” in 1789; one could conclude that he was the same person, and he is mentioned only once with the name “French”.

Then, Andrew Grimm owned 990 acres of land called “Frenches Vineyard” in 1753 and 1759 with a certificate on the land saying Peter French. From Deb [1]: I have a note saying that Andrew Grim bought land called “Dry Bottom” from Peter French, too. These transactions might mean that the two men could be related by marriage. Maybe a look at Andrew Grim would give us some clues about Peter French. Peter’s father, John French, died in Hagerstown, Washington County, MD on 22 Dec 1787.

Then, George French, William Paca, and Samuel Chase did a resurvey on “Three Springs” in 1760. Henry Pitner and James Macky made a resurvey on “Frenches Vineyard” in 1760, and so did Peter Rench and Daniel Dulaney in 1746. John Beard made a resurvey on “Frenches Venture” in 1759. George French made a resurvey on “Balsher’s Misfortune” owned by Christopher Burkhead, 115 acres, from the “History of Western Maryland including Biographical Sketches” 1968 Vol 2, page 984.

Look at http://worldconnect.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=lesa&id=I27591 search for French and others. From Lesa, email: lesapfrommer@cox.net.

1747-1790 -- The following lands are listed for the surname French:

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LandPatentOwnersWashCo1730-1830.pdf. “A” David Funck died 27 Aug 1799 in Washington County, MD. Also in the Land Patent of Washington County document are Henry Avery, “Scotch Lot”, 202 acres, origin 1745, final 1746. Also John Felker, “Schnebley’s Improvement”, 125 acres, 1818. Although the surnames Funck, Funk, and Founk appear various times, no dates or lot names or other names relate these surnames to the surname French.

1748 -- The western portions of Maryland (including present Washington County) were incorporated into Prince George's County in 1696. This original county included six current counties. The first to be created was Frederick, separated from Prince George's County in 1748. Washington County was formed on September 6, 1776 by the division of Frederick County

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Antrim, Franklin County, PA

1748 Jun 15 -- Jacob French 1st was deeded 47 acres and 28 perches of land in Antrim, Cumberland County (later called Franklin County), PA. The same day, Jacob Snively was deeded adjoining land. Three years later in 1751, Jacob French 2nd married Jacob Snively’s daughter Magdalena Snively. This survey map below of 3 Oct 1755 shows Jacob French 1st’s land, which was settled in 1759 after his death in 1755. Because his wife had dowery rights to the land after his death, she probably remained there until her death. Jacob had built a log home on this property. From the Pennsylvania Land Warrant Applications for 1748. Jacob Snevely is also on this list.

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John Scott: From Vicki [32]: From “Lewises, Meriweathers, and Their Kin” by Sarah Travers Lewis Scott Anderson. John Scott was an early settler on one of the tributaries of the Antitiem in Washington Twp, later called Franklin County, PA. In 1751 he obtained a MD Patent for 187 acres on the Greencastle and Waynesboro Turnpike Nov. 8, 1762, also a PA patent for 109 acres Sept 25, 1770. His plantation was partly in Antitiem and partly in Washington Twp. He lived there until his death. His will was dated 1 March 1782, which was proved 11 May 1790. His wife was Mary. He may have been the son of David Scott, an early settler in the Great Cove, Fulton Co, PA. He held title to land dated 1749 in Great Cove. The name “John Scott” was listed in the Taxable List of 1751, 1752, 1785, 1786, 1787, 1821, 1842 in Antrim.

Thomas Brown: The name “Thomas Brown” was listed in the Taxable List of 1751 and 1752 in Antrim.

Jonathan Gingrick: Gingerich becomes Kingery in some instances: Although the most common early European spelling of the name seems to be Gingerich, today in America there are many variations. The passenger list for the Palatine ship "Adventure Galley", a ship that brought indentured servants to Pennsylvania under William Penn to populize the state, said from Rotterdam to Philadelphia on 2 Oct 1727 and has Johannes Ullerich listed, which is believed to be Johannes Gingerich. Johannes Gingerich began showing up in Lancaster Co PA about 1735 on church records. The PA state archives shows that John Kingry was naturalized as a US citizen in Sep 1743, under the heading “Quakers”. Johannes Gingerich was b. 1679 in Alsace, Canton Bern, Switzerland and d. 1769 in Warwick, Lancaster Co., PA. He began showing up on the Church of the Brethren records in 1735 in Lancaster Co., PA. The name “Gingrick” was not listed in the Taxable List of 1751 and 1752 in Antrim. This gravestone in Annville, Lebanon County, PA, shows how close the Miller, Snavely, and Gingrich families were.

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Jacob Snively: The name “ Jacob Snively” was not listed in the Taxable List of 1751 and 1752 in Antrim. Emigrants, Refugees, and Prisoners (An Aid to Mennonite Research) - By Richard Warren DavisPage 351 - Johann Jacob “Schneble” born in 1694, father of Jacob Snively, appears on tax rolls of Conestoga Twp. in 1718.  In 1728 Johann Jacob Schnebele built a house on Kauffman Run, now Landis Run, a tributary of Conestoga Creek, still occupied and in good condition (in 1986?).  It was the center for the Mennonite community and a wagon stop for travelers. As the name Jacob Schnebely/Snively was frequently used in Pennsylvania, finding his children as not been so easy; some sources indicate his children were John, Magdalene, Eve, Anna, and Christian. Other sources say Michael, Jacob, Barbara, Margaret, and John.

John Snively, b. 1720, m. Louisa French in 1743, moved from Antrim to Frederick Co., MD; some of their children moved to Ohio.

Magdalene Snively, m. Jacob French.

Eve Snively was allegedly captured by Indians near Bedford, PA and taken to the Detroit area, where she remained for 12 years before being released.  This could have occurred during the height of the French and Indian Wars.  She had a brother-in-law with the last name of Householder who was killed by Indians.  He was married to her sister Anna.

Anna Snively m. Abraham Long who was b. ca. 1730, immigrated 1748 to Delaware at age 18.

Christian Snively, b. 15 Aug 1731, lived in Antrim, Franklin Co. PA, d. 16 Mar 1795.

Jacob French: The name “French” was not listed in the Taxable List of 1751 and 1752 in Antrim.

The number of Germans in Pennsylvania about 1755 was from 60,000 to 70,000.  About nine-tenths of the first settlers of York County, then including Adams, were Germans.  The great influx into Cumberland County which, with the exception of a few English, was settled almost exclusively by Scotch and Scotch-Irish, began about 1770; though as early as the period from 1736 to 1745, there were found in the Conococheague settlements, the Snivelys, Schneiders, Piscackers, Liepers, Ledermans, Haricks, Laws, Kolps, Gabriels, Ringers, Steiners, Senseneys, Radebachs, Reischers, Wolffs, Schneidts, Rupp.  Rev. Michael Schlatter, a German reformed minister, in a letter dated May 9, 1748, thus describes a visit through the valley: "On the Conogogig we reached the house of an honest Schweitzer [supposed to be Jacob  Snively, of Antrim Township,] where we received kind entertainment with thankfulness.  In this neighborhood there are very fine lands for cultivation and pasture, exceedingly fruitful without the application of manures.  Turkish corn (Indian maize) grows to the height of ten feet and higher, and the grasses are remarkable fine.  Hereabout, there still remains a good number of Indians, the original dwellers of the soil. They are hospitable and quiet, and well affected to the Christians until the latter make them drunk with strong drink."

Johann Georg Rupp, b. 11 Aug 1721 Bas-Rhin, France, m. 23 Jan 1750 Ribeauville, France, d. 13 Sep 1807 Northampton, PA.

George Frantz, b. 7 Mar 1681 Bas-Rhin, France, m. 21 Mar 1713, d. 1 Sep 1758 Diedendorf, Bas-Rhin, Alsace, France


The three original counties of Pennsylvania, established by William Penn in 1682, were Chester, Philadelphia and Bucks.  Chester County included all the land (except a small portion of Philadelphia County, southwest of the Schuylkill to the extreme limits of the State. Lancaster County was formed and taken from Chester May 10, 1729; York was taken from Lancaster August 9, 1749.  Cumberland County remained a part of Lancaster until it was itself erected a separate county, January 27, 1750.  Franklin County, the then southwestern part of Cumberland, and known as the "Conococheague Settlement," was established September 9, 1784.  To understand the early history of this country, the reader will need therefore, to bear in mind two facts:

1.  Prior to January 27, 1750, its territory (with the exception of Warren township) was found in the county of Lancaster.

2.  From January 27, 1750 to September 9, 1784, it belonged to Cumberland County.  Since the latter date (September 9, 1784) it has had a distinct organization of its own.

In what is ANTRIM TOWNSHIP there must have been settlers as early as 1734.  In the JOHNSTON GRAVEYARD, near SHADY GROVE, is a tablet bearing the name of JAMES JOHNSON, who died in 1765.  "From documents still extant," says the inscription "he settled on the land on which he died as early as 1735 and was probably the first white settler in what is now ANTRIM TOWNSHIP, Franklin County."  He had two sons, JAMES and THOMAS, both of whom were colonels in the Revolutionary war.  About the same time settlements were made near the present site of GREEN CASTLE, by JOSEPH CRUNKLETON, JACOB SNIVELY, AND JAMES RODY.  SNIVELY was the progenitor of a large and respectable family, many of whom still live in the township, concerning whom much will be said in the township and biographical sketches. (Footnote: Some of the earliest warrants found in the surveyor's office bear date as follows: 1737, JOHN MITCHELL. DAVID McGAW; 1738, DAVID SCOTT, GEORGE REYNOLDS; 1740-42, DAVID  KENNEDY, HUMPHREY JONES; 1743-50, JOHN POTTER, SAMUEL MCPHERREN, JOHN  BROTHERTON, ROBERT WALLACE, WILLIAM MAGAW, THOMAS POE, GEORGE GIBSON, WILLIAM SMITH, JACOB SNIVELY, WILLIAM ALLISON, ABRAHAM GABLE, and JOHN DAVISON.

From History of Franklin County Pennsylvania, Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1887. French is not mentioned. See http://files.usgwarchives.net/pa/franklin/history/local/wbeers005.txt 

1748 Jun 15 -- The earliest mention of Jacob French 1st is his purchase of approximately 47 ¼ acres on 15 Jun 1748 in Greencastle, Antrim Township, PA [32], bordering the state of Maryland. “FRENCH, Jacob on 15 June 1748 for 50 acres adjoining John KINGRY (or Gingrick) and Thomas BROWN in Antrim Twp and to pay £2.10”. It was also land next to that of Jacob Snively, whose son John Snively married Louisa French, the daughter of Jacob French 1st, see FFA Chart #30 [32]. Deb [1] and Vicki [32] state that because Jacob French had only 47 acres and Jacob Snively had over 1700 acres, Jacob French must have just started buying land.

Antrim township in PA was founded in 1741, only 7 years before Jacob French purchased land.

From Vicki, Ref. [32]: According to the Lancaster Warrant Register, page 66, that land was sold or “returned to a Henry Snively* 13 April, 1774”. Henry Snively died in 1802 leaving wife Barbara and children John, Jacob, Joseph, Elizabeth, Henry. See Snively Genealogy. I have been talking with a historian in Antrim and one of his friends sent a Tract Description and map of this early property. The tract description is for GRN 113: Lancaster County, warrant F162 to Jacob French dated 15 June 1748.  Survey A-061-187 dated 1755. Called “Lubec”. On the map I could see that the property was very close to where the Antrim Mennonite school is today, that being 414 Zarger Road, Greencastle, PA, which is next to a creek. The home is in lovely condition and is at 763 Zarger Road just off Old Grindstone Hill Road in Shady Grove, Antrim Twp., Franklin Co. (then western Lancaster Co.), PA, just east of present Greencastle. I called the school and a Mr. Whitmer said I should speak with Luke Martin on the other side of I 81.  I called and spoke with his wife. Mrs. Martin wrote “After careful consideration, we have decided that land is next to ours.”  She has been helping me get it touch with that neighbor, without giving the name or phone number. (I sent a letter of introduction with a photo of the French family group that traveled to Lena, IL....and she forwarded it.)

*Henry Snively was b. 1739 in Antrim, the son of Jacob Schnebele and his second wife Barbara Eberly. With Jacob’s first wife who remains unknown, he had children John and Magdalene, both of whom married into the French family.

From Vicki, ca. 2011-2012, Ref. [32]: This 47-acre plot above was superimposed on a current USGS map, and there it is, just a short distance from Greencastle, PA. (1st Families of Old Cumberland County, vol XV by Hayes R. Eschenmann and Paul Barney, page 20: GRN113). And driving on I -81, that’s about 10 minutes from Hagerstown, MD.  An old timer in the area says it’s “within spitting distance from Leitersberg, MD”.  We knew we had to look at this Jacob French and look at his relationship with the Snively’s.

From Vicki, ca. 2011-2012, Ref. [32]: After returning from the Antrim Township area and Lancaster - I am more convinced that Jacob French 1st of Antrim is father of the Jacob French 2nd who married Magdalena Snively. The Jacob French 1st whose wife was Martha lived on land adjoining Jacob Snively in 1748....they both bought land the same day.  Three years later, Jacob French 2nd married Magdalena Snively and in 1743 John Snively married Louisa French

From Vicki, ca. 2011-2012, Ref. [32]: Our biggest finds came in Greencastle in the kitchen of Luke Martin and the dining room of Lu Miller. Luke studied the survey of the 1748 Jacob French land superimposed on the USGS map of the area, and decided that it was now on his land, just across from the Mennonite School on the other side of I-81. He gave us permission to walk that cornfield in March. Lu Miller’s family had owned the land at one time, calling it the “back farm” until her uncle sold it to Luke Martin many years ago. In a shoebox from a closet, she let us spread out a survey from 1811 that showed the Jacob French farm now owned by “Joseph Snively of Henry”.  (We know from land records that the Jacob French farm came into the possession of Henry Snively in 1774.) Her husband copied it to Brian’s jump drive. Later Lu sent us a copy of the large Indenture from 1812 which read in part “the said described tract or parcel of Land being part of a larger tract of Land called “Lubec” surveyed for Jacob French – in pursuance of a warrant from the Properties of the late Province of Pennsylvania dated 15 day June 1748, which said Jacob French by his certain Deed Poll dated the 17th day of October 1763 granted and conveyed the same for the Consideration therein mentioned – unto Henry Snively of said township of Antrim, the father of the said Jacob party hereto to which said Henry – a patent was granted by the then Proprietaries of the Provence of Pennsylvania – Thomas Penn and Richard Penn for the said tract of land surveyed for said Jacob French as of which the patent is dated – the 14th day of April 1774 and recorded in the rolls office of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in Patent Book AA volume 14 page 453 which said mentioned Henry is since deceased and by his last will and testament in writing duly made and executed on the aforesaid to his son Joseph (party hereto) and his kins – as by said will recorded in the office for Register of Wills in end for the said County Franklin Book page 147…..”

Jacob’s land tract contained 47 acres and 28 perches and the usual allowance of 6% for roads surveyed for Jacob French in 1755, bearing the date 15 Jun 1748. Note his neighbors: Thomas Brown, Jacob Snively (who shows up in Lancaster Co., PA in 1714), Jonathan Gingrich, and John Scott. Jacob Snively filed a land application on the same day as Jacob French did.

From Vicki, Ref [32]: The land that Jacob French 1st bought in 1748 went to Jacob Snively in 1774. I have a copy of the deed. The Jacob French estate was settled in 1758, and the land did not belong to Snively until 1774. Somehow I think it remained in the family.....maybe as Martha's property until 1774.

John Scott, Henry Snively, Christopher Snively, Joseph Snively, and Andrew Snively are all listed in the Pennsylvania Tax and Exoneration List of 1768-1801. No French is on this list as they had all moved to Maryland. John Scott is listed in Antrim, Franklin Co., PA, in 1785. John Scott is listed in the 1790 Census of Franklin County, PA with 2 males under 16, 4 males over 16, and 4 females. He is listed next to Peter Miller.

The two major reasons for so many variations in names are:

1) There was so much prejudice against these early Swiss/German settlers, many of the early members of the family "anglicized" the name to be more like their English neighbors, especially in Lancaster Co PA where the family settled at an early date and where the earliest settlers were prodominately Engish and wanted to protect the English language from the German speaking population. The English grumbled about these foreigners with their cultural language and strange customs.

2) Almost all of the Clerks of Court who recorded the earliest records were of English extraction and simply could not understand the German accent or the ornate German handwriting, so they recorded their names in the Court Registers the way they sounded or close to it.

Michael Miller, who married a French was also listed on the ship “Adventure Galley”. Peter Rule, Johannes Layman, Jacob Meyer, Johann Jacob Stutzman, Hendrick Hartman, and Jacob Fisher, were on this same ship. 

From “The History and Topography of Dauphin, Cumberland, Franklin, Bedford, and Adams Counties, Pennsylvania” by Israel Daniel Rupp.

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1748 Jun 15 – Jacob French 1st received a land warrant in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, on 15 Jun 1748, for 50 acres of land according to the “Index of Early Pennsylvania Land Warrantes, 1733-1987”, from the Pennsylvania State Archives, Stevens, Pennsylvania: Ken McCrea, 2010. This land was actually in Antrim, Franklin County, PA according to the map in 1748. This land was next door to Jacob Schnebele (Magdalena’s father) and near the border of MD. We know that Jacob Schnebele was naturalized in 1729 and had been living in PA before that time - probably at least as early as 1718. The Schnebele family were Mennonites from Switzerland.

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From Vicki [32]: The area we are taking about ...the Conococheague/ Cumberland Valley area, where Jacob French bought 48 acres in 1748 was not settled by Europeans until 1735 at the earliest. (Joseph Crunkleton obtained a Blunston license in 1734.)  Jacob Schnebele/Snively came there between 1735 and 1738.  It was evacuated during the French and Indian War for months.  

From Building on the Gospel Foundation: In 1752 Jacob French patented Day Spring, an 100 acre tract located "1/2 mile southward of Jacob Rohrer's plantation."  (pg 72)

Jacob Schnebeli died August 24, 1766. George French lived just across the Maryland border...and paid the executors the seven pounds he owed Schnebele. Jacob French received money as part of his wife Magdalena’s share. (pg 87)  In 1754, Jacob French sold Day Spring to Paul Rhodes, probably a Dunker, and French's wife Martha released her dower rights. “Martha may have been an earlier wife of French or an English clerk's corruption of Magdalena. In later land sales by Jacob French, his wife's name is alway Magdalena."  (pg 723, footnote 35)  Huckelberry Hall was surveyed to Jacob French in 1759.

In this footnote (35) the authors explain:  For Jacob French, see Coldham 4:102, and Patricia A. Andersen, Frederick County Maryland land Records, Liber E Abstracts 1752-1756 (Montgomery Village, Md.: P.A. Andersen, 1995). For the index of 81 surnames of French, see http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=SHOW&db=mrmarsha&recno=33684.

1749-1773 -- Frederick County Court (Land Records, Index, Microfilm), Maryland, 1748-1778, MSA CE 109-1. Pages 128-139.

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Page 126, begin surname F, no French.

Page 127, no French.

Page 128, Elizabeth French, Frederick County MD, 22 Aug 1752 and 17 Mar 1757. I wonder who was Elizabeth French who bought and sold land in Frederick Co, MD, in 1752 and 1757.

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Page 129: George French. 1749 Jun 20 – 1769 Mar 20George French bought and sold land in Frederick County, MD. From Frederick County Court (Land Records, Index, Microfilm), Maryland, 1748-1778, MSA CE 109-1. The last land he sold was on 20 Mar 1769 to John Rohrer; George French died shortly thereafter ca. 1772 and is not mentioned further in documents.

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Page 130: George French, Frederick County MD, continued.

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Page 131, no French. 

Page 132, Frederick County MD, only Jacob French, deeded land to Paul Rhode, 23 Sep 1754.

Page 133, no French.

Page 134, no French.

Page 135, Frederick County MD, Jacob French to John Schnebely 28 Aug 1769, and Andrew Evey 25 Jun 1770.  

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Page 136, Jacob French, Frederick County MD, 26 Apr 1773, deeded land to Andrew Evey. 

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Page 137, Peter French, Frederick County MD, deeded land to Martin Funck on 3 Jun 1770 and 22 Jun 1772.

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Page 138, No French.

Page 139, Peter French and his wife, Frederick County MD, to Devalt Mong (Mung in Germany), Peter’s wife was a Mong. Devalt Mong appears in Scharf’s History of Western Maryland along with other members of the Mong family: George, Jacob, John, Joseph P. Peter, Peter S., and Rebecca. Devalt was born in 1746 in York, PA, to Johann Gottfried Mang (from Trippstadt, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany) and Maria Barbara Jearang (Jesserang), and died 29 Apr 1801 in Washington County, MD. He m. Mary Hewett and had son Peter Mong, and had a second marriage and had 8 children: Mary Magdaline, Margaret, Godfrey, Elizabeth, Jacob, Susan, DeWalt Jr., and Catherine.

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Page 140-142, No French.

Page 143, begin surname G.

Page 446, George French, Frederick County MD, 24 Feb 1777 and 18 Mar 1777. George French deeded to Arianna Scott indicates George French of FFA Chart #166. The George French who was related to Jacob French must have died ca. 1772.

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1749 or before Jacob French 2nd married and started a family.

Barbara French, b. ca. 1758, m. Martin Helm, d. ca. 1825.

Mary J. French, b. ca. 1760, m1. Loved Reed, no children.

George French, b. ca. 1750, m1, unk and had several children, m2. Mary Saveley in 1789 and had more children, d. 1830. He is in the 1830 census of Berkeley County, WV, age 80.

Jacob French 3rd, b. ca. 1750, m. Catherine Pitzer, d. 8 Apr 1826.

John French, b. ca. 1750, m. Catherine (most likely Hedges), d.

Henry French, b. 12 Mar 1755, m. Elizabeth Earsom, d.

Margaret French, m. Henry Miller, d.  

1749 -1755 -- The children of George French were born: Barbary, Evy, Mary, George, Henry, and John French. Wife is unknown plus this information cannot be verified.

1750 -- Louisa French Snively and John Snively had issue.  RESEARCH MORE

1. Michael Snively, b. ca. 1750 in Maryland, moved to Sunfish Creek (3 miles from Sinking Spring), Ross Co., OH, in 1802 from Pennsylvania. He was in the 1790 census of Washington County, MD, with 2 males under 16, 2 males over 16, and 4 females. Name written as Schnavely. Living next door is Jacob Schnavely, and next door to him is John Schnavely in 1790.

2. Jacob Snively, b. ca. 1750 in PA. He was in the 1790 census of Washington County, MD, with 1 male over 16, and 2 females. He is listed in the 1779 Pennsylvania Septennial Census of 1779-1863 in Leacock, Lancaster. Jacob Schnavely is in the 1790 census of Washington, MD.

3. Barbara Snively in 1790 census of Franklin, PA, as head of household, m. William Jackson

4. Margaret Snively

5. John Snively Jr., b. ca. 1755 in PA, m. Mary Miller, d. before 14 Mar 1826 in Wythe Co., VA (now Smyth), buried in Scott Cemetery, Smyth Co., Atkins, VA. Occupation: farmer. Father: John Schnebele or Snavely. Another source says he died on 18 Jul 1833 in Montgomery Co., VA. He was in the 1790 census of Washington County, MD, with 3 males over 16 and 6 females.

1751 -- From Vicki, Ref. [32]: Jacob French 2nd, married Magdalena Snively in 1751, Ref. [66], page 72. They both needed to be age 21 before their marriage, indicating they were both born in 1730 or before. Magdalena’s brother John Schnebele, a blacksmith, married Louisa French in 1743. In 1751 the tax record of Antrim Township in the newly created Cumberland County listed John Schnebele along with his father, but not Jacob French.

1751 Apr 18 John French’s runaway servant man, Reuben Jones, from the Pennsylvania Gazette of Philadelphia, PA. Mount Holly is a borough in Cumberland County, PA. Don’t know if he’s related.

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1751 -- The surname French is no longer shown in the early tax list of Antrim, Franklin Co., PA, by 1751-1752. Jacob French 1st and his wife Martha probably moved to the Chewsville area in Maryland in 1752, very close to where their son George French had 1700+ acres. Jacob Snively and John Snively are listed, thereby indicating that Louise French Snively still lived in Antrim in 1751. Also on this list are John Scott, Thomas Brown, James Scott, and David Scott. In 1751, Antrim Township, Cumberland County would have included present day Antrim, Quincy and Washington Townships, i.e. the entire southeastern corner of modern Franklin County.

Land in Maryland -- 1752

Jacob French 1st bought 100 acres in the Chewsville area, very close to where George French had 1700 plus acres. Jacob bought that land in 1752 and sold it in 1754, with Martha releasing her widow's dower rights. From Deb [1]: As far as the wife of Jacob French of Antrim Township in Pennsylvania, I've pasted the reference below from p. 723 in Building on the Gospel Foundation, the Mennonites of Franklin County, Pennsylvania and Washington County, Maryland, 1730-1970. It says "In 1754, Jacob French sold Day Spring to Paul Rhodes, probably a Dunker, and French's wife Martha released her dower rights. Martha may have been an earlier wife of French or an English clerk's corruption of Magdalena. In later land sales by Jacob French, his wife's name is always Magdalena." 

On page 72, the same book says: “As the population of Germans in the Conococheague increased, so did in proportion the number of Mennonists. In addition to new settlers, part of the increase consisted of children of the first settlers who had reached adulthood. Jacob Schnebele’s oldest son John, a blacksmith, married Louisa French, possibly a member of George French’s family. In 1751, the tax record for Antrim Township in the newly created Cumberland County listed John Schnebele along with his father. Magdalena, an older daughter of Jacob Schnebele, married Jacob French. In 1752, French patented Dry Spring, an 100-acre tract located 'one half mile southward of Jacob Rohrer’s plantation.' "

It doesn't really say that Jacob French married Magdalena Schebele in 1751 - only says that they were married. Maybe they were married about the same time that Jacob got his land in Antrim Township in 1748 - or maybe it was later than 1754. We don't have enough information to know for sure.

Apparently Martha’s name was not on the deed of the land in Maryland; therefore, she needed to sign the papers to allow the sale to go through. Dower rights are the rights that a non-owner spouse has in the real property of his/her spouse. It was originally set up when the husband was the only real property owner. It was designed to allow the non-owner wife to make sure that if her husband sold their home without her permission she would still have some protection in the value of the real property, so that if the husband later died, she could claim the one third of the value of her right to live in the home or the value of income produced by any farm, rental or other real property that he owned for the rest of her life. Giving permission for such a sale is called release of dower rights. This rule applies even if the real property was solely owned by the other spouse before the marriage took place. Some people will insist on an agreement before the marriage that requires that the spouse-to-be give up his or her future dower rights. So when you think of dower rights think of veto power over transactions involving real property.

1752 -- Jacob French 1st patented “Day Spring” or “Dry Springs” or “Dry Springs Joining to a Rock”, a 100-acre tract located in the Chewsville area of Washington County in Maryland “one-half mile southward of Jacob Rohrer’s plantation.” The land was very close to where his son George French had 1700+ acres. Jacob sold the land in 1754, smf his wife Martha released her widow’s dower rights and probably stayed there until she died. The land was in the Leitersburg area just a few miles away from his land called Huckelberry Hill and “one half mile southward of Jacob Rohrer’s plantation.” The land was just north of George French’s land called “Resurvey of George’s Mistake”. Daniel Dulany owned “The Mistake” of 100 acres on 3 Mar 1742/43, and George French owned it on 4 Dec 1747, which he bought exactly 2 months after he was naturalized.

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Jacob French 1st and his wife Martha home is only a few miles away from the Leitersburg area, MD, where Jacob French 1st had bought “Day Spring” in 1752 and sold it in 1754. It is assumed Jacob French was in good health in 1752 at age about 48, but sold it 2 years later and died 3 Oct 1755. Martha relinquished her dower rights on this land before Jacob died. Martha was able to receive 100% of the claim on the land and the land would pass free and clear to the potential future owner, instead of Martha receiving only one-third from whoever owned the land at the time after Jacob’s death.

The following descriptions of keeping or releasing dower rights in the colonial period indicates that Jacob had a will, and that Martha probably needed to sell it quickly to pay debts, and therefore released her dower rights but was allowed to live on the property until she died.

Colonial America brought with it a practice from England called "dower rights." At that time, property holders were typically men. Property ownership at a man's death was transferred to his eldest living son or, if there was no son, to his eldest daughter's husband. Dower rights assured the widow that upon her husband's passing she would continue to have the right to live in the home in which she had been living, or that she would benefit financially from the property's sale so she would have some income to survive on. In early America, dower rights amounted to a one-third interest in the property and any income generated from it. What this meant was that if a husband died and there were claims by others against the property to settle his debts, any property he held could not be foreclosed or forced into sale while his widow still lived, because she had unassailable dower rights in the property. If Jacob had a will and if he mentioned Martha in it, she would stand to inherit a lot more or be in a better situation than if she would keep the dower rights of the land; therefore, she would release dower rights.

Another version:

Under English common law and in colonial America, dower was the share of a deceased husband's real estate to which his widow was entitled after his death. After the widow's death, the real estate was then inherited as designated in her deceased husband's will; she had no rights to sell or bequeath the property independently. She did have rights to income from the dower during her lifetime, including rents and including income from crops grown on the land. One-third was the share of her late husband's real property to which dower rights entitled her; the husband could increase the share beyond one-third in his will. Where a mortgage or other debts offset the value of real estate and other property at the husband's death, dower rights meant that the estate could not be settled and the property could not be sold until the widow's death. In the 18th and 19th centuries, increasingly dower rights were ignored in order to settle estates more quickly, especially when mortgages or debts were involved. Therefore, Martha released her dower rights.

1752 -- The French family then moved to to Frederick Co., Maryland where only 3 men with the surname French are listed on ancestry.com: Jacob French 2nd in 1752, John French in 1759, and George French in 1776.

1752Jacob French 2nd bought 100 acres of land called “Dry Spring” joining to sharp rock in 1752 in the Chewsville area in Frederick County, Maryland, very close to where his brother George French had 1700 plus acres. Jacob French 2nd sold this land on 23 Sep 1754, with his wife releasing her widow’s dower rights. From the Frederick County Land Abstracts, Liber M 1768-1770 book, 547-548 on page 47.

1752 – George French acquired 100 acres called “Sly Fox” about ½ a mile west of Antietam in Washington County, MD. He added 42 acres to “Sly Fox” in 1759, and an additional 50 acres in 1760. See LandPatentOwnersWashCo1730-1830.pdf.

1753 Dec 20 -- Jacob French 2nd, see Coldham, 4:102, and Patricia A, Anderson, Frederick County Maryland Land Records Liber E Abstracts, 1752-1756. Andrew Grimm owned 990 acres of land called “French’s Vineyard” in 1753 and 1759 with a certificate on the land saying Peter French.

George French acquired “George’s Venture and the Barrens” of 1,462 acres on 20 Dec 1753.

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1753 -- In the Frederick County Land Records a Andrew Grim gave Peter French a certificate for 50 acres of land called “Frenches Vineyard” in 1753.  In the same muster roll of Capt John White’s CO, MD Militia is Andrew Grim, George Mong, and as Deb states - Jacob and Peter French. Peter French later marries the Widow Maria Catherine Mong. Jacob and Peter both served in Apt. White’s 6-day service, but not George French as he must have been elderly and perhaps the father of the other men. Maria Catherine, George Mong’s wife, was born 1732 and died 1820. She m1. George Nicholas Mong who was born 1730 in Gy, Loir-et-Cher, Centre, France, and died 11 Feb 1792 in Hagerstown, Washington, MD. George Mong had a sister, Maria Catharina Mong, born on 7 Sep 1737 in Gy, Loir-et-Cher, Centre, France. His next sister, Eva Maria Mong, was born 23 Sep 1740 in York, PA, which narrows down their immigration date. George Nicklas Mong was naturalized in Maryland on 12 Sep 1764.

Beard Family

15 Nov 1753 -- Nicholas Beard bought 164 acres of land from George French. The largest land grant in the present Chewsville District was “Resurvey on George's Mistake,” “George's Venture”, and the “Barrens” totaling 1476 acres, and present village of Chewsville was approximately in the center of this tract, but slightly more to the south and west of the village. This tract was granted to George French March 1, 1775. On November 15, 1757 Nicholas Beard bought 164 acres of this tract from George French, which Beard called “Scared from Home.”

Nicholas Beard was born 1730 in Germany, one of more than 30,000 Germans who migrated to America during the 1700's who were trying to escape religious and political persecution, and to seek a land of greater opportunity. He died in 1804 in Chewsville, Washington County, MD. Nicholas Beard according to Frederick County Court records, show him in the present Hagerstown area as early as 1753. Apparently he was pleased with the Maryland Country and decided to settle here and make this his home. We see him purchasing and selling various tracts in what is now the Chewsville Election District of Washington County. On 15 November 1753 Nicholas Beard bought 164 acres of land from George French. This land was about 1 1\2 miles east of the Old Forge and Colonel Daniel Hughes’ home. Adam Lyday worked for Colonel Hughes. A beautiful Southern mansion was built in 1791 on the land by Phillip Beard, one of Nicholas' sons. The land headquarters for the Province of Maryland for the Hagerstown Valley was located at Conococheague Manor, from which the Province's Surveyor operated. On August 1759, here was completed a survey of a tract for Nicholas Beard, which consisted of the original 164 acres, which was found to contain only 148 acres, to which was added 1225 acres, or a total of 1373 acres, which was one of the largest of the early land grants in the Chewsville District. Other early land grants in the Chewsville District, adjoining Beard's tract “Scared from Home” or very near it. These grants included a tract called “Wolfe's Spring” 50 acres granted to Nicholas Beard March 15, 1762, tract called “Dutch Lass” granted to Frances Deakins, August 8, 1771 for 80 1/4 acres: tract called “Gleanings” consisting of 1357 acres granted to Samuel Chase, and Thomas Johnson, February 17, 1764. In the grant to Beard of “Wolfe's Spring,” the name is spelled both Beard and Bard in the same document. This tract “Wolfe's Spring” was located about 50 perches east of Nicholas Beard’s house, which would be in the rear of the present “Old Forge: Elementary School. On October 20, 1763 Nicholas Beard sold to James Dison (a big land holder in the area) 213 acres from tracts “Bard's Good Will” and “Resurvey of Scared from Home,” and adjoined tract “Whiskey Alley” located along the present road leading from Cavetown to Beaver Creek, south of Pondsville. Nicholas Beard, a shrewd German who came in by way of Pennsylvania took up two tracts of land named “Dutch Lass” and “Scared from Home.” It was while surveying the former that he went ahead of the surveyors and marked off which lands he wanted, and then, when coming to an undesirable strip he would alter his course and pass it by, thus making a very irregular boundary for other claimants and surveyors to follow. The Surveyor called it the “Dutch Lass.”  Good "Nich" had considerable difficulty with his neighbors over these lines because they claimed they were most unreasonable. He was too shrewd a German to permit this affair to get into the Colonial courts, so they compromised by trading certain lands that would straighten the lines thus making it satisfactory to all. As a result of this and the criticism from his neighbors, we find the following land transfers by Nicholas Beard
on October 28, 1765 to help keep the neighbors happy:
To George French 50 acres,
 To Leonard Stephen (probably Stephy) 202 acres
, To George Wink 101 acres,
 To Andrew Stephen (probably Stephy} 207 acres, 
To Andrew Stephen (probably Stephy} 25 acres part of Wolfe’s Spring.

On October 24, 1763 Nicholas Beard sold to John Roher 383 acres, a tract called “John's Adventure” and part of  “Scared from Home.” John Rohrer, Frederick Rohrer, and Jacob Rohrer, were among the heavy land holders in the early days of the present Chewsville District. The Rohrers built the old Trovinger Mill along the Antietam Creek, across the creek from the old Antietam Church in the early 1790's. A photostat copy of the land grant “Scared from Home” has been obtained from the Hall of Records in Annapolis. The original grant containing “the great seal of the Province of Maryland and bearing a signature of Governor Horatio Sharpe” is on file at the Washington County Historical Society. The surveyor’s plot of the tract is also on file.
The photostat copy of Nicholas Beard’s signature in Philadelphia when he landed August 13, 1750 is practically identical to his signature in the land records of Frederick County when he transferred land to his neighbors October 28, 1765.  In all records of sale of land by Nicholas Beard in Washington County Court House, at place for signature there is a statement “Signed in Dutch.” On June 22, 1803 there is the last public record of Nicholas Beard.  He was an old man by that time. If he were age 25 when he arrived in America in 1750 he would have been about 78 in 1803. On 22 June 1803, Nicholas Beard disposed of all his remaining lands (about 400 acres) to his four sons as follows: Nicholas Beard, Jr. 100 acres; Andrew Beard, 75 acres plus 38 acres which was the old Beard home across the road from Beard's Church; George Beard, 100 acres; Philip Beard, 100 acres. This was his last public record. The tract sold to Nicholas Jr. was probably the Barry Hartle farm east of Chewsville, now owned by Robert Hartle. The tracts sold to sons Philip and George have not yet been identified. One of them could have been the old Danny Oswald farm south of Chewsville, as Nicholas Beard is supposed to have built the beautiful colonial mansion on the Oswald place some time during the 1790's.William’s, “History of Washington County” and Schraf's, “History of Western Maryland,” mention a Peter Beard and speaks of Nicholas, Peter’s father living ‘hard by’.  Major John Beard is buried in the Graveyard. In the 1790 Census there are 10 Beards listed in Washington County, all spelling their names “Beard” except Nicholas who spells his name “Bard.” During the 1700’s and 1800’s Nicholas Beard and his descendants for the most part lived in the eastern part of the county, in the area of Chewsville, Cavetown, Leitersburg, and Smithsburg. Washington County Historical Library: Frances Thompson surmises that Major John Beard was a brother of Nichols (but which Nicholas)? Some of the information about the land holdings was published in the Hagerstown Mail Newspaper on April 4, 1873.


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1754 Sep 23 -- His wife (was this Martha or Magdalena Snively?) signed the dower’s agreement giving her the ability to sell his property in the Chewsville area in Frederick, Maryland, which she did on 23 Sep 1754. This land included 100 acres bought in 1752 and was very close to where his son George French had 1700 plus acres. From the Frederick County Land Abstracts, Liber M 1768-1770 book, 547-548 on page 47. Also see “Frederick County Maryland and Surrounding Areas” which shows surname records beginning in 1744.

RESEARCH MARIA CATHERINE MONG

1754 Sep 23 – Jacob French wife Magdalena French signed the dower’s agreement giving her the ability to sell his property in the Chewsville area in Frederick, Maryland, on 23 Sep 1754; no other record of her name has been found. This land included 100 acres bought in 1752 and was very close to where his son George French had 1700 plus acres. From the Frederick County Land Abstracts, Liber M 1768-1770 book, 547-548 on page 47. Also see http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~midmdroots/research/books.htm

From Vicki: Jacob sold the 100-acre property “Day Spring” near Leitersburg in 1754.  Martha relinquished her dower rights.  The 48-acre piece in Greencastle, next to Snively land went to a Henry Snively in 1774. (Lancaster Warrant Register, page 66.)

From Lancaster County, PA Deed Abstracts compiled by Thomas Mayhill: “In pursuance of a Warrant dated the 15th day of June, 1748 there was surveyed for Jacob French 1st a certain tract of land called “Lubec” in Antrim township in the county of Cumberland, “(Followed by a description of the property, Hickory trees and all).” And whereas the Said Jacob French 2nd in and by a certain Deed Poll dated the 17th day of October 1763 granted the same unto Henry Snively of Antrim township yeoman in fee.”  It goes on to indicate that Henry Snively paid seven pounds six shillings lawful money....witnessed 17th day of April, 1774.  Signed by John Penn  “Recorded 11th June 1773.” Most likely Jacob French 2nd had moved to Maryland and Henry Snively, son of Jacob Snively, was next in line to inherit the land.

1754-1763 – The French and Indian War was the North American theater of the worldwide Seven Years' War. The war was fought between the colonies of British America and New France, with both sides supported by military units from their parent countries of Great Britain and France, as well as Native American allies.

1754 Sep 1 -- Jacob French 1st sold “Dry Springs Joining to a Rock” in Washington Co., MD [32] to Paul Rhodes, probably a Dunker, on 1 Sep 1754, the year before he died according to Vicki [32] who found this information at the Frederick County Maryland Land Records, Liber E Abstracts, 1752-1756. She also verified that Martha French, Jacob’s wife, released her dower rights. A wife had a section on her husband’s land that could not be sold with the property unless she signed. They had at least 4 children (George, Louise, Jacob, and John).

1754 -- Peter French bought 50 acres of land ¼ mile south of the widow Mong’s land (see George Mong mentioned in 1757, her son). The transaction became final in 1759. He had to be 21 years old to buy the land, and was therefore was born circa 1733 or before.  From Peg [1]: I've found a couple of Peter Frenchs mentioned in MD or VA records who are separated enough in time to be different men. The one who married the Widow Mong has a good chance of being a brother to Jacob French (born 172? - died 1788) of Berkeley County. This, for me, is because of the proximity of this Peter French as far as time and place as well as the fact that the Mong name sounds more German than British. At http://www.msa.md.gov/msa/stagser/s1500/s1527/html/ssi1527m.html (Maryland Indexes Marriage References MSA S 1527). "Mong, Catherine, widow of Godfrey Mong, m. by 1755, Peter French (MDAD 38:252; BFD 1:117, 2:20)." There's also a Peter French listed with Jacob French (I think the Jacob eventually of Berkeley County) in the 1757 muster roll of John White's Company - Maryland militia. An unofficial source online states that Maria Catharina Mong was born on 7 Sep 1737 in Trippstadt, Rhineland Palantinate, Germany, and her sister Eva Maria Mong was born on 23 Sep 1740 in York County, PA, indicating an immigration date between 1738-1740. Her father, Johann Gottfried Mong was born in 1712 and died ca. Apr 1750 near Leitersburg, Washington County, Maryland. Her mother, Maria Barbara Jesserange was born in 1715 and died Jul 1774 in Washington County, Maryland. She married Peter French which can be evidenced by Peter’s death date in Washington County, Maryland, in 1887 where the French and Mong families owned land next to each other. Catharine Mong appears in the 1810 census of Jerusalem and Upper Antietam Hundreds, Washington County, MD.

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1754 Sep 23Jacob French 1st bought 100 acres of land in 1752 in the Chewsville area in Frederick County, Maryland, very close to where his son George French had 1700 plus acres. Jacob sold this land on 23 Sep 1754, with Martha releasing her widow’s dower rights. From the Frederick County Land Abstracts, Liber M 1768-1770 book, 547-548 on page 47. (Jacob died the next year – not for sure).

1754-1763 -- The French and Indian War. The PA and MD border was under conflict. Germans were recruited to settle the PA lands. Scotch-Irish were recruited to Antrim because they were staunch defenders. There were 3000 men capable of fighting in the area in 1754, but by 1755, there were only 100nd People were being killed, and fled – to York, PA and to Leitersburg District, Washington Co., MD (where the French family went).  They began to return in 1757 [74].

From Vicki [32]: Ken Houk of the Conestoga Historical Society said that Mennonites did not fight in the French and Indian War (1753-1765) for more than 6 days. Capt John White's Company for 6 days of service seems to prove that out. What it suggests to me is that Jacob French, as well as Henry Snevely, Jacob Miller, Andrew Hover, and probably John Rorar, and John Stull were Mennonites - and from the same locale. I notice George French is not on the list, but went to Annapolis in 1747 with some of these men (or their sons with the same first name) to petition for naturalization. My sense is George French and Jacob French 2nd were a generation older than these men in the militia during the French and Indian War. Captain John White from the Maryland militia served his six days of service in 1757. And Capt White's sons were there:  Peter White, Leonard White, and John Stull. Capt John married Martha Stull in 1750. Jacob Stull went to Annapolis with George French and Jacob Stull died in 1749. Click to see 3 pages of the Maryland Militia of Colonial Soldiers of the South, 1732-1763, of Capt. John White’s Company, of soldiers (all Mennonists) who served their limit of 6 days per their religion, which Deb, Ref [1], sent to the FFA.  Page 1    Page 2    Page 3

Familiar names are Lieutenant Henry Snevely, George Mong, Frederick Rorar, Jacob French, John Stull, Michael Miller, John Rorar, Peter French, Jacob Miller, Andrew Hover. “Soldiers of the South, 1732-1774” by Murtie June Clark, 1983-1999, is online if you have a subscription to ancestry.com: http://search.ancestry.com/Browse/BookView.aspx?dbid=49108&iid=FLHG_ColonialSoldiersSouth-0003. 

Because of the border dispute along the MD/ PA border, settlements were being encouraged with land grants. Land warrants and patents were used for revenue and taxation.  A fire in Lancaster destroyed tax records from 1740 to 50. Early Lancaster records were housed in Westchester in Chester County, PA. [75]

1755 -- The Conocoheague Mennonist congregation grew from just a few scattered families in the late 1730’s, to approximately 25 families in 1755. By this date they lived for the most part in several neighborhood clusters along the Conococheague and Antietam creeks. The largest was in the Upper Antietam where the Simons, Rohrers, Hoovers, Frenchs, Bachtels, and Mussamens settled.  (Today the Leitersburg area- Vicki [32])  The Funks at Marsh Head might be considered a southern extension of this cluster.  (pg 75)

Jacob Schebele and his sons, just across the border in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, made up the smallest and most northern cluster of the congregation. (pg 75) (From Vicki, Ref. [32]: Jacob Schnebele is noted as the first Mennonite to arrive in Antrim Township.)

John Rohrer was the son of Jacob Rohrer, who was one of the first Mennonists to return to the valley.  (From Vicki, Ref. [32]: In 1755, the population dropped significantly as people fled because of the dangerous conditions related to the French and Indian War.)  John Rohrer was back in the area by 1757, when he purchased “Warm Indian”, a 500-acre tract, from George French.

1755 -- George French (the son of Jacob French 1st) had a resurvey on his lands called “George’s Venture” and “Mistake” that he had bought on Dec 4, 1747, containing 100 acres, next to “French’s Contrivance”, scared from home. On 11 Aug 1770, William Deakins Jr. of Prince George’s County bought 30 acres of French’s Contrivance in Frederick County. It is believed that either George French had died or moved by 1770, and if he had died, his children were not living in the area or he would have not sold it to William Deakins Jr.  Daniel Dulany had bought “Mistake” prior to George French on March 3, 1742-43. See LandPatentOwnersWashCo1730-1830.pdf. From Frederick County, MD, Land Deeds, page 73.

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The Conocoheague Mennonist congregation grew from just a few scattered families in the late 1730’s, to approximately 25 families in 1755.  By this date they lived for the most part in several neighborhood clusters along the Conococheague and Antietam creeks. The largest was in the Upper Antietam where the Simons, Rohrers, Hoovers, Frenchs, Bachtels, and Mussamens settled.  (Today the Leitersburg area- Vicki [32])  The Funks at Marsh Head might be considered a southern extension of this cluster [66].

According to the MD State Archives, George French in Frederick County owned 1462-acres which included “Resurvey on George's Mistake”, “George's Venture”, and “The Barrens”. This is confirmed in Settlers of Maryland: 1751-1765 by Peter Wilson Coldham on page 102. 

After the Death of Jacob French 1st

1755 -- Jacob French 1st Jacob died ca. 1755 and his estate in Antrim was settled in 1759 as John Scott, his neighbor, was the administrator. Jacob’s wife outlived him; her name may have been Martha. Jacob died during the French and Indian War (1754-1763), but perhaps not because of the war as he had prepared documents beforehand. His land was surveyed and appraised on 3 Oct 1755 and settled on 20 Sep 1759. Supposedly, Jacob died before 3 Oct 1755 and his wife Martha, who had dower’s rights to the land, died before 20 Sep 1759.

Note: “A” Jacob French of Anne Arundel County, MD, died on 23 Jun 1757 listing his wife Ann Guishard and next of kind were Benjamin French and Susan French; he was from another French line (Wills, vol 33-36, 1764-1768). His estate was settled in 1759 after his death ca. 1755. His inventory may be listed in the Probate Records in Anne Arundel County, Maryland [135]. Ann French of Herring Bay, Anne Arundel County, MD, was born in 1713 and wrote her will on 8 Nov 1785.

1755-59 -- In the Fall of 2010, Ref. [32] Vicki made a stop at the Frederick County Historical Society. She found in the Prerogative Court of MD: 1751-56: (notice John Scott is listed – he was a landowner next to Jacob French in Antrim in 1748).

Jacob French 1st   Oct 3, 1755   August 26, 1759  Next of kin:  Samuel and Thomas Scott with administrator - John Scott.  1755 is the appraisal date - usually soon after the death.  The second date is the estate settlement date 26 Aug 1759. 

Jacob French 1st 10-3-1755    9-20-1759 (appraisal date and settlement date)
Appraisers:             John Dowell. Lewis Lewn
Creditors:               Henry Darnell, P Dannor, John Allein
Next of Kin:            Samuel Scott, Thomas Scott
Administrator:       John Scott

His “next of kin” were Samuel and Thomas Scott, and the administrator was John Scott, the owner of the land next to Jacob French and Jacob Snively shown above in 1748. At this time, the term “next of kin” did not necessarily imply a blood relative, as was the jurisdiction in the United Kingdom. But, Jacob French did have close blood relatives in 1755, but perhaps not in that area. His will could have been written on his death bed. Could Scott or Brown be his wife’s surname, Martha Scott/Brown?

In 1715, the General Assembly passed an act requiring that all estate inventories be witnessed by the two "of the next of kin" and two greatest creditors. The signatures of these two family members appear on each inventory. The relationships of the "next of kin" to the deceased are not stated, though they are seldom relatives with an interest in the estate.

Ancestry of John, Samuel, and Thomas Scott: John Scott, a Scotch-Irish, paid taxes in Antrim, Franklin County, PA, in 1785, 1786, 1787, 1821, and his name is in the 1820 census (could be another generation of that name). No French is listed in this census of Antrim, but there was a Jacob Frantz.

Thomas Scott made his will in 1814 in Antrim, Franklin County, PA.

1751 Antrim, Franklin County Tax List by I. Daniel Rupp, 1846: (No French or Gingrick listed, but Scott and Snively are listed)
Samuel Smith
Joseph Walter
Jas Jonston
Wm Allison
Wm McGraw
Sam McFaran
John Reynolds
Wm Grimes
John Mitchel
Thomas Brown
John Scott
Robt Southerland
Wm. McAlmorey
Wm. Mearns
John Smith
Wm. McClean
Geo. Martin
Wid. Leeper
Jacob Batterly
Peter Leeper
Wm. Erwin
John Mouk
James Scott
Jas. Ramsey
John Moorhead
John Chambers
Jacob Piskacker
Kath. Leatherman
Edward Nichols
Paulus Harick
Dietrich Lauw
Nicholas Gulp
James Lilou
David Scott
John McMath
Thomas Patterson
George Cassil
John Pritchet
Wm. Dunbar
Thomas Poa
Wm. McBriar
David McBriar
Thos. Nisbet
Wid. Adams
Jas. McBride
Josh. McFaran
David McClellan
John Gyles
Henry Pauling
Abraham Gabriel
John Staret
David Kennedy
John Willocks
Wm. Clark
Wm. Cross
Henry Stall
Peter Johnston
Thomas Long
James McClanahan
John Roal
Joshua Coal
Thos. Davis
Josh. Crunkleton jr
Robt. Harkness
Wm. Hall
Hugh McClellan
Lorence Galocher
Wm. Rankin
John Potter
Wm. Ramsey
Nath. Harkness
Josh. Alexander
Patrick McIntire
John Roass
Arch'd McClean
Jas. Paile
John Davies
Peter Craul
Henry Dutch
Henry Kefort
Mathias Ringer
Kath. Thomson
Jacob Snider
Wm. Shanon
Thos. Grogan
George Gordon
Samuel Monagh
Jacob Snively
John Crunkleton
Anthony Thomson
James McKee
Robt. Hamilton
Wm. Patrick
Jas. Finley
Pat. McClarin
Jas. Pattro
John Wallace
Adam Hoops


Freemen:
Jacob Gabriel
Hugh Galocher
E. Alexander
W. Campbell
Alex. Cook
James Ross
Adam Murray
Jas. Young
Hugh McKee
Daniel McCoy
Daniel McCowan
Chas. White
Wm. McGaughy
Jas. McGowan
John Snively
Joseph Morgan

**In 1751, Antrim Township, Cumberland County would have included present day Antrim, Quincy and Washington Townships, i.e. the entire southeastern corner of modern Franklin County.

Vicki, Ref. [32], does not know of any French’s staying in the Antrim area after 1759 as the property was being sold to Henry Snively who was a half brother of siblings John and Magdalene Snively (same father but different mothers, first mother is unknown, second mother was Barbara Eberly). See Snively Genealogy. Jacob French 2nd bought Huckleberry Hall by 1759 perhaps with the proceeds from the Antrim land. Perhaps by 1763 Martha had died and the children had all left Antrim, but the Antrim property stayed in the French family until Henry Snively bought it.

1757 -- John Rohrer, son of Jacob Rohrer, was one of the first Mennonists to return to the valley in 1757 after people fled in 1755 because of the dangerous conditions related to the French and Indian War (1754-1763). John Rohrer purchased “Warm Indian”, a 500-acre tract from George French, the son of Jacob French 1st.

Deb, Ref. [1] sent the FFA a Maryland Militia List dated circa 1757 during the French and Indian War. It is a muster of Captain John White’s Company for 6 days of service. Ken Houk of the Conestoga Area Historical Society said that the “Mennonites did not fight in the French and Indian War for more than six days.” The names on the list that I recognize are men who lived in the Washington County, MD area:

John Stull
George Mong
Jacob French
Michael Miller
John Rorer (Rohrer)
Peter French
Henry Snevely (Snively)

Between 1733-1743, Jacob of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was listed as Franck, Frank, and Frans on the Pennsylvania Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index 1772-1890.

A case against the above surname is that it lists Georg Franck in Philadelphia in 1754 and we know George French was in Maryland at that time and no longer affiliated with Pennsylvania. It also lists Peter Franck in 1754; the name Jacob Franck continues to appear long after the French family was not in Philadelphia indicating that the Jacob French of this document was not Jacob Franck. In 1737 “a” Johan, Henrich, Ludwig, Paul, and Jacob Frantz are in Philadelphia.

http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=pacen&gss=angs-d&new=1&rank=1&gsln=Fran*&gsln_x=NP_NN_NS&MSAV=1&uidh=nye&gl=&gst=&hc=50&fh=50&fsk=BEFpYewIgAAN8gAAS-43-c-61-

1757 Nov 15 -- Nicholas Beard bought 164 acres of this tract from George French, which Beard called “Scared from Home.” This land was about 1 1/2 miles east of the Old Forge and Colonel Daniel Hughes’ home. (Adam Lyday worked for Colonel Hughes).

1758 -- Across the border in Pennsylvania, Jacob Schnebele and his son Christian had returned after the French and Indian War by 1758, when both appeared in the Antrim Township tax list, Ref. [66], page 84. They left Pennsylvania for Maryland at the start of the French and Indian War, probably because they were Mennonites and not allowed to fight in the war more than 6 days, plus they lived in a dangerous area during the war. The lists over the next several years reveal that Jacob Schnebele was one of the wealthiest men in the township. In 1759 out of 171 taxpayers (137 of whom paid between £1 and £10), Schnebele ranked second highest at £56, Ref. [66], page 85.

1758 -- List of Maryland Militia, 1732-1763, Muster of Captain John White’s Company, Maryland Militia, for 6 days service, which was as long as a Mennonite was allowed to serve, proving all these men were Mennonites [1]:

Jacob French 2nd, Michael Miller, John Rorar (or Rohrer), Peter French, Jacob Miller, Andrew Hover (or Hoover), Henry Snevely. Andrew Hoover was naturalized in the same group as George French in 1747.

These men were identified in an article by James O. Lehman as likely Mennonites by Amos C. Baer who was reported to have done the “most extensive research on early Mennonite families” and lived at time of the article (1976) in Hagerstown, Maryland: Henry Avey, Isaac Bachley, Samuel Bachley, Jr., John Bomberger, John Bowman, Joseph Bowman, Henry Funk, Henry Funk, Jr., John Funk, Joseph Funk, Martin Funk, Samuel Funk, Abraham Gansinger, Abraham Good, Christian Good, John Good, Jacob Hess, Christian Hoover, Jacob Hoover, John Hoover, John Hoover, Jr. Olerick Hoover, Abraham Houser, Jacob Huffer, Abraham Lidey, Christian Newcomer, Jacob Rohrer, John Rohrer, Martin Rohrer, Christian Shank, Michael Shank, Samuel Vulgamet, John Washabaugh, and Chrisley Weldy, possibly others. From http://cimlg.org/ciblog/2013/10/.

1759 -- Peter French bought 50 acres called “Dry Bottom” about 1/4th of a mile south of Widow Mong’s land in Washington Co., MD. She was the widow of Peter Mong. See LandPatentOwnersWashCo1730-1830.pdf. Peter French had to be 21 in order to buy land in 1759; therefore, he was b. 1738 or before. The French family then bought land in Frederick Co., Maryland where only 3 men with the surname French are listed on ancestry.com: Jacob French in 1752, Peter French in 1759, and George French in 1776.

Huckleberry Hall

1759 Sep 29 – Jacob French 2nd bought Huckleberry Hall in Leitersburg, MD on 29 Sep 1759.....then moved to what is now WV in 1770.

Photos below show Huckleberry Hall at various times:

1. Photo taken by Paula S. Reed in 1990.
2. An earlier photo of Huckleberry Hall.
3. The Irish cottage at Huckleberry Hall ca. 1797.

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From Vicki [32]: According to the History of the Leitersburg District Washington County, MD by Herbert Bell in 1898: Huckleberry Hall was originally surveyed for Daniel Dulaney, December 5, 1742, but before completing the title he died. The patent was granted to Jacob French 2nd, September 29, 1759. (page 35). In 1770, the land belonged to John Schnebley (Jacob French 2nd’s brother-in-law), and it was leased to Jacob Good*. In 1772, Jacob Good purchased it, took part in the Revolutionary War, and lived in Huckleberry Hall until his death in 1797. I have a copy of the transfer of that tract of land known as Huckleberry Hall unto “Jacob French of Frederick.....tract of land Huckleberry Hall beginning at a white oak....” witnessed  by Horatio Sharpe Governor of the Province of Maryland on the 29th day of September, 1759. This was sent from the Kansas State Historical Society. My husband and I were so lucky to have been able to visit both Huckleberry Hall and walk the 48-acres of land in Greencastle....it is now planted in wheat and corn by Luke Martin, the owner and a Mennonite. 

*Jacob Good was born in 1722 in Manheim, Lancaster County, PA, and died on 19 Aug 1797 in Leitersburg, Washingtoon County, MD. Good was spelled Guth in Germany. He was the son of Jacob Guth and Anna Leeinburg of Michelfeld, Schwäbisch Hall, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany. The Good family immigrated to Pensylvania in 1729. Jacob Guth the father died on 22 Apr 1730 in Conestoga, Lancaster County, PA. Jacob Good was buried in 1797 at Good (Guth) Family Cemetery, located at 13555 Popular Grove Road near the intersection of Durberry Road. The estate known as Huckleberry Hill or Durboraw or Winter Mill. The Good (Guth) family were Mennonites. He married Barbara and had children Anna Good, married Peter Longenecker; Elizabeth Good, was the second wife of Joseph S. Long; John Good; Barbara Good, married Peter Whitmer; Catharine Good, married Peter Newcomer; Jacob Good, married Mary Snively; Mary Good, married Christian Hershey; Christian Good, married Barbara, her maiden name has not been established, and Abraham Good. This same source states that Jacob Good was probably a descendant of one Hans Guth, a Swiss who settled south of the Conestoga creek, Lancaster county, PA, and he was one of the first Mennonite settlers in Leitersburg district, Washington county, MD., as early as 1765. In 1770 Jacob leased “Huckleberry Hall”, a tract of two hundred forty acres on the Little Antietam Creek, located on the Popular Grove road, near the old Charles Mill, between Smithsburg and Leitersburg, which he purchased in 1772. Here he resided until his death. Many of the Good (Guth) family were buried at the Good Cemetery in Leitersburg, MA.    

Huckleberry Hall is an historic farm complex located at Leitersburg, Washington County, Maryland. The complex includes a 2 ½-story Germanic stone house built about 1784, an 18th century stone blacksmith shop, a frame bank barn, a mid-19th century brick secondary dwelling, and other agricultural outbuildings, and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1990. Huckleberry Hall was originally surveyed for Daniel Dulany, December 5, 1742, but before completing the title he died (Daniel Dulany was born in 1685 in Ireland and died on 5 Dec 1753 in Maryland). The patent was granted to Jacob French, September 29, 1759; its area was one hundred acres, the boundary of which was described as “Beginning at a bounded white oak standing by the side of Forbush's branch*, a draught of Antietam Creek." The next owner was John Schnebley, from whom this tract with other adjacent land aggregating 240 acres was leased by Jacob Good in 1770. It was specified that at the expiration of the lease “There will be left with the place all buildings such as it is at present, with all the improvements; likewise the table and benches in the house; also two bedsteads, with divers household goods, the iron stove excepted.” The value of all “building, clearing, ditching, or damming the water” done by Good was to be appraised by four men. In 1772 he purchased the entire tract. Here he resided from 1787 until his death in 1797. Huckleberry Hall was subsequently owned by the Barrs and Winters and is now embraced partly in the farm of C. L. G. Anderson. From “History of Leitersburg District, Washington County, Maryland”, by Herbert C. Bell, 1898.

*“Forbush's branch” is now known as Little Antietam, the latter designation having completely superseded the former, which would no longer be recognized in this locality. Yet George Forbush, from whom the stream derived the name by which it was known in 1740, was undoubtedly one of the earliest settlers along its course; and although he took his departure about the time the first permanent settlers began to arrive, the location of his plantation can be determined with a fair degree of probability. On the 23d of August, 1743, John Darling secured a patent for Deceit, a tract of 108 acres, the boundaries of which are described as “Beginning at a bounded white oak standing nigh a branch of Antietam on the top of a steep hill and near the place that George Forbush formerly lived on.” In the patent for Darling's Sale (surveyed in 1739), its boundaries are described as “Beginning at a bounded white oak standing on the southeast side of Little Antietam creek, near the plantation of one George Forbush.” From a plot of the Stoner lands entered in the land records of Washington County in 1820, it is ascertained that this “bounded white oak” stood on the present line between the lands of Daniel W. Durboraw and Charles B. and Levi B. Wolfinger; the “steep hill” referred to in the patent for Deceit is therefore embraced principally in the property of Jacob B. Stoner and the Forbush plantation doubtless included the adjacent meadows.

The following article is from “History of Leitersburg District, Washington County, MD.”

 Description: Huckleberry

From Vicki, Ref. [32]: John Snively bought half of Huckleberry Hall in 1770, and Andrew Eaby bought the other half. Jacob French 2nds brother George French built a ‘stone house about 7 miles away from Huckleberry Hall, the very house where Patricia Schooley lives now. Jacob French 2nd then moved to Hedgesville, located at that time in VA, now in WV. Vicki believes that George French did not move to Hedgesville as he died ca. 1772. John Snively eventually sold Huckleberry Hall to Jacob Good who built the house that still stands. Vicki states that there is an “Irish” cottage on the property that others have decided is older than the main house – it is Irish because of the configuration of the door and window – they are attached to the same frame (see photo above).

From Vicki, ca. 2011-2012, Ref. [32]: We walked the Jacob French 2nd farm in Berkeley Co., WV, found a few headstones lying on the ground – two of which had the initials “J.F.” on them. We were invited in the Teter Myer French house nearby in Hedgesville, WV. We met Steve French and his mother, Donna Jean French.

Then we toured the property at Huckleberry Hall in Hagerstown, MD, and visited Pat Schooley at the Old Forge Farm. The book Pat put together on the Architectural and Historical Treasures of Washington County, Maryland has been a valuable source of information. We were sent to a courthouse in Hagerstown, MD, and were allowed to photograph the “Heirs Agreement “ by Jacob French 2nd in 1785.  We knew that we had to return to Antrim Township to find out more. Two very different historians in two different locals - Greencastle and Lancaster, listened to what we knew, and made interesting comments and gave suggestions on where else to look. One very interesting thing they both suggested was to look at the French Hugeunots from Arcadia who originated in Alsace Lorraine. They came to the PA and MD areas during the 1700’s...  One stated that the Mennonites did not have permission to marry couples for a while....based on their lack of Theological training. Therefore most Mennonites in the Lancaster area were married in Lutheran and reformed churches in Lancaster. 

1759 -- George French, the son of Jacob French 1st bought 58 acres called “French’s Lott”. 

1759 Aug 21 -- George French appeared in the August Court of 1759 on the third Tuesday and the 21st day of August. George was on the Grand Jury in Frederick Co., MD.

1759 – From Frederick County Court (Land Records, Index, Microfilm), Maryland, 1748-1778, MSA CE 109-1, mostly on page 0135 onwards. Notice Peter French mentions his wife. Vicki [32] saw Peter French's land “Dry Bottom” which he bought in 1759. Also she sold 50 acres called “Frenches Vineyard” to Peter French (certificate).

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On 13 Aug 1753 Andrew Grim bought 50 acres of French’s Vineyard in Frederick County. On 29 Sep 1761 Andrew Grim bought 940 acres of French’s Vineyard in Frederick County.

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1760 -- George French, William Paca, and Samuel Chase did a resurvey on “Three Springs” in 1760. Also, Henry Pitner and James Macky made a resurvey on “French’s Vineyard” in 1760, and so did Peter Rench and Daniel Dulaney in 1746. Peter Rench may have been Peter French. John Beard made a resurvey on “French’s Venture” in 1759. George French made a resurvey on “Balshea’s Misfortune” owned by Christopher Burkhead.

Peter Rench appears in Frederick County in 1776 in the Maryland Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1772-1890. Peter Rench also appears in Elizabeth Parish in Frederick County, Maryland, in 1756. Peter Rench also appears in Maryland for “The Resurvey on Dawson’s Strife” on 17 Jun 1757. Peter Rench appears on the 1764 Rent Rolls of Frederick County, MD; also in 1764, George surveyed land patents for “George’s Discovery” 1387 acres, Certificates #237 and #238 (p. 30) in Frederick County, MD, Land Deeds with George French. Peter Rentch appears in the 1790 census of Washington County, Maryland, with 3 males under 16, 3 males over 16, 1 female, and 1 slave, for a total of 8. An online family tree states that Peter was named Joseph Peter Rench, born 1724 in Bern, Switzerland, the son of Peter Rentsch and Margaret Stull, and that he married Margaret Bar in 1750 in Frederick County, MD, and he died on 8 Sep 1804 in Washington County, MD, and may have been buried at the Salem Reformed Church Cemetery in Cearfoss, Washington County, MD, where other members of his family were buried; this church existed from 1747. He arrived in Maryland in 1739. His father Peter was born in 1699 and died on 16 Mar 1772 in Conococheague, Frederick County, MD. Peter had a brother named Andrew, born 1 Sep 1732 in Zweigsing, Canton of Bern, Switzerland, who also immigrated at the same time; see [200] in Bibliography or see the Andrew Rench Biography. A descendant of this Rench family, Catherine Rench, was born in 1764 in Washington County, MD and died on 29 Jul 1804 in Hagerstown, Washington County, MD, and married John Schnebly whose name is on her gravestone; he was born 3 Sep 1758 in Hagerstown, Washington County, MD. See www.findagrave.

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1760 -- From Deb, Ref. [1]: The info on George French, son of Jacob French 1st, in VA is from "A Guide to the Virginia Miscellany Papers, 1657-1931"; website is at http://ead.lib.virginia.edu/vivaead/published/lva/vi01107.component. Look at page 12 of this document.

1760 – George French acquired 100 acres called “Sly Fox” about ½ a mile west of Antietam. He added 42 acres to “Sly Fox” in 1759, and an additional 50 acres in 1760.

1760 -- Jacob French’s 2nd first child born in Washington Co., MD.

1760 -- George French was granted 50 acres called “Waggoner’s Fancy” which was surveyed on 6 May 1760, and passed on 28 Mar 1761, Frederick County, Maryland. See LandPatentOwnersWashCo1730-1830.pdf. Also see http://plato.mdarchives.state.md.us/msa/stagser/s1500/s1529/cfm/dsp_unit.cfm?county=fr&qualifier=S&series=1197&unit=5401.

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1760 Mar 17 -- George French appeared in the August Court of 1760 on the third Tuesday and the 17th day of March. George was on the Grand Jury in Frederick Co., MD.

1761 Jan 31 – John Snevely acquired 10 acres called “Small Bit” in Western Maryland.

1761 Oct 15 -- Jacob French 2nd bought 50 acres called “Out Lot” or “Outlet” in Frederick Co., MD, 80P from “Darling’s Sale”, next “Add to Outlet” on 15 Oct 1761. See LandPatentOwnersWashCo1730-1830.pdf. This is confirmed in Settlers of Maryland: 1751-1765 by Peter Wilson Coldham on page 102. 

1762 -- George French built a stone house at “Old Forge Farm”. This two-story stone house was quite elaborate compared to the houses his children lived in. George also had a lot more land than his other relatives had. Jacob French 2nd had bought 100 acres called Huckleberry Hall just 3 years prior in 1759 when Jacob’s and George’s father’s estate was settled (their father was Jacob French 1st). The 2 lands (Old Forge Farm and Huckleberry Hall) were 7 miles apart from one another. The main block of the stone house was built in 1762 by George French. He later sold it to Barnabas Hughes and his 2 sons two years later in 1764, reason unknown, and it remained the home of Daniel until his death on 9 Dec 1818, who added the wing to the east. Daniel Hughes was born in Donegal, Ireland in 1744. George French remained in Washington Co., MD, and continued to buy land. See http://washingtoncountyhistoricaltrust.org/summer-picnic-meeting-2015/.

Remove?

Note: George French of FFA Chart #166, was married to Ariana, whose mother was Hannah Hughes. The marriage of George and Ariana could have been a second marriage. It is believed that these are two separate Hughes families for FFA Chart #166 and #195.

1753 -- Ariana’s mother, Hannah Hughes, deeded Ariana on 9 Mar 1753 one negro woman called Nell and a negro child called Flora for a year.

1770 – Hannah Hughes’ will [mother of Ariana] was proved 4 Dec 1770 in Baltimore.

The following photos are of the Old Forge Farm.

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Old Forge Farm is a historic farm, with a two-story, three-bay field stone house, built in 1762 by George French, then purchased two years later by the Hughes family, and near the site of their iron plantation. Old Forge produced nails and tacks; had a grist mill, lumber mill, a stone duplex, and other structures to support the industry. Old Forge Farm is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Hughes brothers, Daniel and Samuel, were iron manufacturers and owned a number of iron furnaces and forges in the area. Antietam Forge, later called “Old Forge”, produced nails and was located on Antietam Creek below the house. Little Antietam Creek runs beneath Old Forge Rd. and avoids Clopper Rd.

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The “Old Forge Farm” is shown above and below. It is off Old Forge Rd. at Clopper Road. An addition has been added on the back of the house, and a front porch on the front. The middle section of the house is the original stone house built by George French. Antietam Creek is across Clopper Road. Vicki says she knew she had arrived there when she saw a flock of peahens crossing the road in front of her. The address is 20702 Old Forge Rd., Hagerstown, Maryland (which is actually on Clopper Road). The Old Forge is the first building on the right on Clopper Rd.

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1762 Dec 2 -- From The Pennsylvania Gazette in Philadelphia, 2 Dec 1762 at the time George French bought the Old Forge Farm property asking for assistance.

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1763 Jan 10 – John Snively and Louisa French bought “Warm Weather” on 10 Jan 1763. Maryland land records book BC43 pages 280-282, John Snevely his patt 313 acres Warm Weather. Frederick Know ye that whereas John Snevely of Frederick County by his humble petition to our agents for management of land affaires within this province did set forth that he was seized in fee of and in a tract or parcel of Land called Cold Weather lying and being in the county aforesaid originally on the tenth day of January Anno Domini seventeen hundred and sixty six granted unto the petitioner for one hundred and eighty seven acres and three quarters of an acre and or now Rent contiguous to which tract the petitioner has discovered some vacant land and being desirous to add the same humbly prayed a special warrant to resurvey the aforesaid tract for the intent & purpose & that on return of certificate of such resurvey he making good rights to the vacancy added and complying with all other requisites usual I such cases might have our grant of conformation issue unto him thereon which was granted him, And accordingly a warrant on the twenty first day of April sixteen hundred and sixty nine unto him for that purpose did issue but the said warrant not being executed within the time therein limited it was on the first day of September seventeen hundred and sixty nine (1 Sep 1769) received and continued in force for six months longer from that date with Liberty of resurveying and including fifty three acres part of a tract called Huckleberry Hall lying and being in the county aforesaid and contiguous to the aforesaid tract called Cold Weather, originally on the twenty ninth day of September seventeen hundred and fifty nine (9 Sep 1759) granted to Jacob French fore one hundred acres under new rent, in pursuance his certificate ___ our Land Office that the aforesaid tracts or parcels of Land are resurveyed by which it Appears they contain clear of older surveys no more than the quantity of two hundred and twenty seven acres so there appears to be a deficiency of twenty and three quarters of an acre & that there is the quantity of ninety six acres of warrant land added, twenty three and three quarters acres part thereof is applied to make good the deficiency aforesaid and there remaining seventy two and a quarter acres __ his made good rights to by applying and ______ so much parts of a warrant for ninety one acres from John Rorer granted the said Rorer the ____ eleventh day of May seventeen hundred and seventy six  (11 May 1776) he has paid and satisfied unto John Merton Jordan Esquire our then agent _____ General for our use the sum of six shillings sterling for some improvements mentioned to be made thereon according to Charles Lord Baron of Baltimore our Great Grandfather of Noble Memory his instructions to Charles Carroll Esquire his then agent bearing date at London the twelfth day of September seventeen hundred & twelve (12 Sep 1712) and registered in our secretarys office of our said province together with a paragraph of our Dear Fathers Instructions bearing Date at London the fifteenth day of December seventeen hundred and thirty eight (15 Dec 1738) & registered in our land office. We do therefore hereby grant and confirm unto him the said John Snevely the aforesaid tracts or parcels of land now resurveyed with the vacancy added reduced into one entire tract called Warm Weather. Beginning for the outlines of the whole at the End of the sixth line of Huckleberry Hall it being also the end of the Last Line of the said Cold Weather one of the original tracts and running thence south seventy eight degrees and three quarters of a degree east one hundred and forty four perches to the beginning of part of Huckleberry Hall then with it south fifty five degrees east twenty perches north eighty perches north seventy three degrees west ____ perches then north forty five degrees east one hundred and thirty five perches north seventy three degrees west sixty four perches north twenty four degree east one hundred and forty six perches south eighty nine degrees east forty five perches north fifty six degrees west fourteen perches north eighty nine degrees west forty five perches south twenty four degrees west eighty two perches north fourteen degrees east sixty perches north seventy five degrees west fifty two perches south sixty eight degrees west thirty perches south thirty nine degrees west two hundred and eight perches south thirty degrees west twenty four perches south forty two degrees east fifty two perches south thirty one degrees west sixty perches south three degrees west thirty two perches to the end of the thirteenth line of the original then south thirty nine degrees west thirty four perches south sixty degrees east twenty four perches north four degrees east thirty three perches north forty eight degrees east eight perches then with s straight line to the beginning containing and now laid out for three hundred and thirteen acres of land according to the certificate of survey there of taken & returned into our land office bearing date the fifth day of September seventeen hundred and sixty nine & there remaining together with all rights profits benefits and privileges thereunto belonging Royal mines excepted to have and to hold the same unto him the said John Snevely his heirs & assigns forever to be holdon of us and our heirs as our Manor of Conegocheigue in free & common ____ by Fealty only for all Manner of Services Yielding and Paying therefore yearly unto us and our heirs at our receipt at our city of Saint Marys at the two most usual feast in the Year Viz the feast of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary & Saint Michael the Arch Angel by even and equal portions the rent of twelve shilling and six pence half penny sterling in silver or gold and for a for a fine upon every alienation of the said land or any part or parcel thereof one whole years rent in silver or gold or the full nature thereof in such commodities as we and our heirs or such officer or officers as shall be appointed by us and our heirs from time to time to collect & receive the same shall accept in discharge thereof at the choice of us and our heirs or such officer of officers aforesaid provide that if the said sum for a fine for alienation shall not be paid to us & our heirs or such officer of officers aforesaid before such alienation and the said alienation entered upon record either in the provincial court or county court where the same parcel of land lieth within one month next after such alienation then the said alienation shall be void and of no effect, and provide also and it is the true intent & meaning of these presents that the same is subject & liable to the following express condition (That is to say that the said John Snevely his heirs or assigns shall well & truly pay or cause to be paid the rent herein re___ according to the Tenor of these presents by the space of thirty days next after it shall become due and after demand made thereof by the framer of other person who shall be appointed by us or our heirs from time to time to collect & receive the same, Given under our Great Seal of our said province of Maryland this twentieth day of June Anno Domini seventeen hundred and seventy two (20 Jun 1772). Witness our Brother Robert Elden Esquire Governor & Commander in Chief in and over our said province of Maryland Chancellor Keeper of the Great Seal thereof (signed) Robt Eden

1763 Oct 17 – From Deb [1]: I think that Jacob French 2nd, owner of the Antrim township property, is probably the same Jacob French 2nd who died in Berkeley County, VA in 1788. The quote that Vicki mentions (“whereas the Said Jacob French in and by a certain Deed Poll dated the 17th day of October 1763 granted the same unto Henry Snively”), indicates that the Antrim property owner was still alive in 1763. There seem to have been a number of “resurveys” of property in that time period, so that may be what happened in 1755 when Jacob French 1st died. If he died then, there should be some kind of estate record to find.

1763 Nov 9 -- George French bought 190 acres called “Burkett’s Folly”. See LandPatentOwnersWashCo1730-1830.pdf. Might be called Berketts Folly [189].

1763 Oct 17 -- From Vicki, Ref. [32]: When we were at the Carlisle Courthouse we were introduced to a man who knows a lot about tracing land ownership. The clerks couldn't answer our questions about a deed for Jacob French 1st, and they asked someone they knew to talk with us. David owns an Abstract Services company, and he explained how documents before a certain date had been transferred to Harrisburg...and since he lived in Harrisburg, he offered to look for it. A packet recently arrived from him.  It has the Cumberland County survey of the 47 plus acres surveyed for Jacob French 2nd in 1755...page 187 of the Survey Book A-61-187. Antrim was in Cumberland County then....Franklin County now. Also included is a land patent for Henry Snively. It describes the acreage, and the survey “And whereas the said Jacob French 2nd in and by a Certain Deed Poll dated the 17th day of October 1763 granted the same unto Henry Snively of Antrim township Yeoman in fee.” This says to me that the Jacob French 1st who purchased the land in 1748, and who died ca. 1755-1759, is not the Jacob French 2nd granting the property to Henry Snively. We have the document that indicates this property went to Henry Snively in 1774. John Penn signed and recorded this document 11 June 1773, the patent for Henry Snively.

1763 Nov 9 – George French was granted 190 acres of land called “Berkett’s Folly” in Western Maryland, and he was granted 115 acres of land called “Balsher’s Resurveyed” on the same date in Western Maryland.

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1764 -- George French sold the “Old Forge Farm” property, only 2 years after he build it, to the Hughes family and was Daniel Hughes’ home until his death in 1818. He added the wing to the east. Hughes and his brother Samuel were iron manufacturers and owned a number of iron furnaces and forges in the area. Antietam Forge, later called Old Forge, produced nails and was located on Antietam Creek below the house. Daniel Hughes was an ardent patriot, a colonel in the Revolution, and one of the first county commissioners. George French owned land in VA and MD beginning in 1762 and his son George French moved to Greenville, SC, before 1800 as he is there in the census records, but we cannot find him in 1790 unless he is the George French listed in 1790 in Montgomery Co., MD.

1764 Apr 11 George French was granted land called “George’s Discovery” with 1387 acres, Certificates #237 and #238 (p. 30) in Frederick County, MD, Land Deeds [189].

1765 -- Jacob French 3rd, born before 1765, d. 13 Apr 1826, m. Catherine Pitzer (daughter of Michael Pitzer and Sophia Bashore).

1765 Oct 28 -- Nicholas Beard, a shrewd German who came in by way of Pennsylvania took up two tracts of land named “Dutch Lass” and “Scared from Home”. It was while surveying the former that he went ahead of the surveyors and marked off which lands he wanted, and then, when coming to an undesirable strip he would alter his course and pass it by, thus making a very irregular boundary for other claimants and surveyors to follow. The Surveyor called it the “Dutch Lass”. Good “Nich” had considerable difficulty with his neighbors over these lines because they claimed they were most unreasonable. He was too shrewd a German to permit this affair to get into the Colonial courts, so they compromised by trading certain lands that would straighten the lines thus making it satisfactory to all. As a result of this and the criticism from his neighbors we find the following land transfers by Nicholas Beard on October 28, 1765 to help keep the neighbors happy:

To George French 50 acres

To Leonard Stephen (probably Stephy) 202 acres

To George Wink 101 acres

To Andrew Stephen (probably Stephy) 207 acres

To Andrew Stephen (probably Stephy) 25 acres part of Wolfe's Spring.

1765 -- Isaac Simon’s widow Feronica (or Veronica in German) bought four small lots totaling 98 acres from George French. Over the next ten years as her sons reached maturity she distributed the land to them, Ref. [66], page 86.

1766 May 15 -- In Jacob Schnebele’s will of 5/15/1766, Jacob gave his sons from his first marriage, Christian and John, equal shares in his home farm. John (who had married Louisa French) received the land on which Jacob had lived, and was to take care of his stepmother Barbara (Eberly). Jacob’s other sons—Jacob, Henry, Andrew, and Joseph—received tracts located elsewhere in Antrim and Guilford townships. To ensure that “his daughters received an equal portion of his estate, Jacob sold his lands to his sons for specific sums named in his will. After deducting the amount of their equal share, the sons were to make annual payments to the estate for distribution to their sisters.” Among the special provisions in his will, Jacob gave his daughter Barbara, a widow, an additional bequest of 50 pounds. He directed that his two youngest sons Andrew and Joseph be apprenticed to a trade. He also had his executors pay for two years of schooling for his youngest daughters, Catherine and Elizabeth, an unusual move during this time period.

Children listed in John Jacob Snavely's will:
Jacob that tract of land whereon he now lives.
Joseph and Andrew be put to trades.
Christiana listed between Eva (Epha) and Anna but indicates my youngest daughter
Catherine shall live with her mother till she attain age of 10 years.
Also indicates daughter Elinor? (this appears to be Mary)
Barbara Eva ....her heirs indicating probably already married and with children.
Veronica (Fannie or Phronica) not mentioned in will.

1766 Aug 24 -- Jacob Schnebele/Snively (2nd) who was born in Switzerland in 1694, died in Antrim, PA [91]. After Jacob Schnebele’s (2nd) death on August 24, 1766 at age 72 leaving 17 children, the executors of the estate, sons John Snively (who was married to Louisa French) and Henry Snively (Jacob Schnebele’s eldest son by his second marriage) made a detailed inventory of his personal property. Among the books listed were three large “Dutch Bibles”, a “Dutch Testament”, and four “Books of Hymns and Psalms”, Ref. [66], page 87. The administration account of Schnebele’s estate listed a number of Mennonists from across the Maryland border. George French paid the executors the £7 he owed Schnebele, Ref. [66], page 87. Jacob French 2nd also received money as part of his wife Magdalena’s share, Ref. [66], page 87, being the daughter of Jacob Schnebele. Because we know that the Schnebele/Snively family was from Switzerland and spoke German as they were from the German-speaking area near Zürich, one would assume that perhaps the books belonged to Louisa French, indicating that she could have been Dutch.

1766 Aug 21 – John French appears for an application for 180 acres of land situated in Hanover Township, Lancaster County, PA.

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John French appears for an application for 180 acres of land situated in Hanover Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania adjoining William Skiles and Richard Crawford John Sharp and Thomas Sharp, signed August 21, 1766.

1766 Dec 17 – Will was proved for Jacob Snively of Antrim, PA. He was married to Barbara Eberly (his second wife) at the time of his death. Magdalene Snivley was his daughter who was married to Jacob French 2nd. Will written 15 May 1766, see above.   

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George French reduces his assets until 1772

1766 -- George French paid back a debt to the deceased Jacob Schnebele / Snively.

1767 -- George French (with Samuel Chase) made a resurvey on his land called “Waggoner’s Fancy” in 1767. André Waggener is listed in the 1810 census of Berkeley Co., VA. Jacob Wagner was born in the Palatinate area of Germany in the year 1717 and immigrated to Lebanon, Lancaster Co., PA.

1767 -- Henry Kalb supersedes 22 November 1767 against George French, Jacob French, and Peter French all sons of Jacob French 1st, for £32.5 and 305 1/2 lbs of tobacco (Land records Liber K Abstracts 1765-1768, p. 117) [32]. Recovered before Wm Luckett, Evan Shelby. The FFA believes these men were all sons of Jacob French 1st who bought land in Antrim township, PA, in 1748, next to land of Jacob Snively, and Louisa French was surely his daughter. This indicates that all 3 men were brothers living in the same location; namely, Maryland. Henry Kalb is listed in the Bucks Co., PA, Church Records in Nockamixon township, where he was baptized at the Evangelical Lutheran Congregational Church. No French is listed from this church, but a Jacob Freich is listed. Henry Kalb died in 1794 according to the Index to the Will Books and Intestate Records of Lancaster Co., PA, which includes only one French, James French who died in 1763. This record of Henry Kalb is so far the only record we have indicating that George, Jacob, and Peter were brothers.

From “Names of Persons for whom Marriage Licenses were issued in the Province of Pennsylvania Previous to 1790”, from “Pennsylvania Archives” edited by Samuel Hazard, John Clair Linn, etc., website: https://books.google.com/books?id=V9MLAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA409&lpg=PA409&dq=quakers+in+pennsylvania+colony+%2B%22Jacob+French%22&source=bl&ots=9g7HE1ZMhT&sig=Loh6me3f8zhCbrMSNK4NuDvwspc&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiWzoi25IXLAhUP52MKHaVKDhYQ6AEINTAE#v=onepage&q&f=false.

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Pennsylvania and Maryland, which was surveyed and marked by the English team of Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon in 1767 and approved in Britain two years later, ended arguments begun when Charles II had issued Pennsylvania’s Charter in 1681.

1768 -- John Scott, Henry Snively, Christopher Snively, Joseph Snively, and Andrew Snively are all listed in the Pennsylvania Tax and Exoneration List of 1768-1801. No French is on this list. Most Frenches had moved to Maryland.

1768 May 12 -- From The Maryland Gazette, Annapolis, Maryland, 12 May 1768.

From Vicki [32]: From Architectural and Historic Treasures of Washington County, MD: “On May 10, 1768, a land patent was issued to John Rohrer for an 817-acre tract called Nancy's Contentment. The patent mentioned John Rohrer's Mill, which is now known as Trovinger's Mill. This tract was resurveyed two years later as Resurvey of Nancy's Contentment; this resurvey referred to John Rohrer's Dwelling House. On 1792, the Rohrer's who probably built the 18th section of this house (The author is describing the house on the “Rohrer House Farm”) sold this property.” (page 95)

So it says to me that George French couldn't/didn't buy the land and Jacob French 2nd is saying he wants it as “the Bond has been assigned over to me.” Has George died? The Rohrer House Farm is just south of the Old Forge Farm built by George French 6 years prior in 1762.

It shows a relationship between George and Jacob. Seems to show some anxiety on Jacob’s part about the 817 acres.....which he apparently didn't get. See description, map, and photos of “Nancy’s Contentment” http://msa.maryland.gov/megafile/msa/stagsere/se1/se5/020000/020800/020814/pdf/msa_se5_20814.pdf. Note that map includes George French’s land “George’s Mistake”, “George’s Venture”, and “The Barrens” of 154 acres. John Rohrer’s farmhouse “Trovinger Mill” on an 817 acre tract of land called “Nancy’s Contentment” below. The mill was in the Rohrer family until 1817. Jacob Rohrer married Nancy Hartman.

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Rohrer House Farm, circa 1770, east of Hagerstown, MD, see websites: http://washingtoncountyhistoricaltrust.org/113-rohrer-house-farm-circa-1770-east-of-hagerstown-md/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trovinger_Mill

http://msa.maryland.gov/megafile/msa/stagsere/se1/se5/020000/020800/020814/pdf/msa_se5_20814.pdf

http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMKDPK_Trovinger_Mill_Hagerstown_Maryland

http://articles.herald-mail.com/1997-04-03/news/25134905_1_water-wheel-arches-swift-water

http://washingtoncountyhistoricaltrust.org/113-rohrer-house-farm-circa-1770-east-of-hagerstown-md/#sthash.iY98jpz9.dpuf

Hopscotch Lane winds north from Trovinger Mill Road, a vestige of an early road that ran between Rohrers Mill and Old Forge Road, fording the Antietam. On the left side of this old roadway is a farmstead behind a white three-board fence. A great frame bank barn set on stone foundations dominates the quiet scene on the right. A gray-painted brick house stands among old trees to the left. Several small accessory buildings are scattered between. This quiet 25 acre farmstead sits on a bluff that slopes down into the oxbow of Antietam Creek that surrounds it on three sides.

The yard around the house is marked with narrow concrete walks and concrete curbs that once defined flowerbeds and gardens. There is a small rectangular fishpond. The house has three bays, two stories and stone foundations. The windows have two-over-two sashes common after 1870, and flat arches of stretcher bricks top both window and door openings. The composition roof is new, and small brick chimneys rise from either gable end. A frame addition at the back of the house has screened porches on its north and south sides.

This appears to be a mid-to-late 19th century house typical of farms in this area. Closer examination shows a different picture. The Flemish bonding of the front faзade ends just above the first-story windows; and outlines of one-story gables can be seen on the present gable ends, suggesting that the building was once just a single story cottage. The older brickwork on these ends is laid in common bond, three rows of stretchers to one of headers. The upper sections of the gable walls are laid in a six-to-one ratio. In the basement, close set logs, flattened on one side, serve as joists, with a few stones still caught between them. This building technique was used in the 18th century, and the stones are remnants of an early insulation that combined stones, clay and other debris tucked between the logs to close the gaps.

On May 10, 1768, a land patent was issued to John Rohrer for an 817-acre tract called Nancy’s Contentment. This patent mentioned John Rohrer’s Mill, which is now known as Trovinger Mill. This tract was resurveyed two years later as The Resurvey of Nancy’s Contentment; this resurvey referred to John Rohrer’s Dwelling House. In 1792 the Rohrers, who probably built the 18th century section of the house, sold this property. The little, one-story brick house which was expanded into the present structure may well have been the dwelling house mentioned in the early deed and thus would have been built prior to 1770.

The main entrance of the house is in the center bay under a single-story porch that spans the front of the house. This door opens into the living room that fills the south half of the original house. On the gable wall (left) is a small, recent fireplace that has replaced the original. All walls have wainscot and chair rail; and, at the back of the room, closed stairs tuck into a corner. On the wall beside these stairs is a cupboard built into a window opening that was closed when the wing was added to the back. Beside this cupboard is the original back door, made of vertical battens on one side and raised panels on the reverse side. The door hangs on its original long strap hinges, but has had a nine-light window cut into its upper half.

On the north side of the living room are two small rooms. This three-room floor plan is similar to that of many early Germanic homes in the area. The heavy doorframes in this section are 18th century and are trimmed with ovolo molding. The basement exhibits more 18th century features with close-set trimmed logs which support the floor above, visible in parts of the ceiling. A large cooking fireplace with a simple mantel board supported on triangular brackets centers on the south wall between two broad, squat doors that open to the outside.

The kitchen at the rear of the house is in a circa 1900 addition. The fireplace, on the west wall, has a firebox taller than it is wide and is framed in plain, two-inch thick boards. An adjacent chimney cupboard is finished with a batten door. In the basement beneath this fireplace is yet another large cooking fireplace built into the stone foundations.

On the second floor, the stairway from the living room enters a large, light, central room with three bedrooms around it. Two have six-panel 18th century doors. These doors were probably reused when the full second floor was added in the late 19th century. Four steps lead down to an ample bath and a fourth bedroom in the space above the kitchen.

For many years this home has been a summer place for Oliver and Margaret Silsby and their six children. The Silsbys lavished care on the land, retaining a broad meadow behind the house and planting 10,000 conifers along the edges of the creek. Nature paths were mowed among the trees and along the stream for all to enjoy. The Silsbys placed the home in the National Register of Historic Places because of its extensive 18th century detail, the continuum of changing styles of vernacular farmhouse architecture and its association with the early mill and the early road.

The Silsby’s family is scattered over the globe now, and the farm has been sold to Lucas and Barbara Brennecke, who fell in love with the setting, the stream and the history of the place. The Brenneckes are sensitive to the history of the Rohrer House Farm and will soon launch an extensive renovation program to both restore historic fabric that has been lost and to expand the house to fit their needs. An architect has been hired and has suggested raising the low ceiling of the kitchen to follow the roofline and thus eliminate the bedroom and bath above. The kitchen will be expanded into the southern porch and a new screened porch wrapped around the house. A library addition is planned for the back of the house. The front porch and the living room fireplace will be restored. The two rooms to the right of the living room in the main block of the house will be opened into a single large dining room. The attic will become a guest room, and a larger guest house will be constructed in half of the forebay of the barn. The other half will become Barbara’s studio so that she can continue her interior design business. A new circle driveway will enter the front of the property.

Barbara will use her skills to be true to the history of the farm and keep all the work in context while making the farm fit their needs. The Maryland Historical Trust will approve all work so that the generous 25 percent state tax credit can be used. The Brenneckes are excited to be starting work on the old house. They look forward to moving to a new community and to enjoying the lovely place that is now theirs.

Epilogue: The Brennekes spent a year-and-a-half determining what kind of restoration could be done. They were disappointed that the kitchen addition had to be taken down because of extensive structural damage. They have replaced it with an addition that is quite similar on the exterior but houses a large, open great room.

This article appeared in the Herald-Mail Sunday, March 21, 1999 as the 113th in the series.

1768 – From Deb [1]. Going thru “Building on the Gospel Foundation” by E. Burdge Jr. and S.L. Horst:  John Rohrer, son of Jacob Rohrer - had his tracts of land resurveyed in 1768 and consolidated into an 817-acre tract named “Nancy's Contentment”, after his wife (p 84). His father Jacob Rohrer had settled on Antitiem Creek lands in 1739. Vicki [32] reports that there are Rohrers in Lampeter, PA that I haven't followed. The Rohrers I'm familiar with are in Leitersburg, MD - Washington County. Leitersburg is east of Hagerstown and south of Waynesboro, PA. Lampeter is a little south of Lancaster, PA.

The following data is from “Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Mennonite Vital Records, 1750-1940” from a card file at the Lancaster Mennonite Historial Society of 800,000 Lancaster County Mennonites. Jacob Rohrer married Nancy Hartman, the daughter of Christian Hartman and Barbara Brubaker. The only problem with “this” Nancy being the same one as the Nancy of “Nancy’s Contentment” is that Jacob Rohrer was born 3 Aug 1780 and died 7 Aug 1866 and is buried at the Mennonite Cemetery in Lampeter, PA. He married Nancy Hartman, born 20 Apr 1788 and died 17 May 1866 just a few months before her husband. Their first child was born in 1809; therefore, these dates don’t compute with the 1768 date above for “Nancy’s Contentment”.

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Other cards from this file are: (see http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=60592).

Abraham born 1788, son of Isaac Rohrer and Elizabeth Groff, lives in Hagerstown, MD, has children Michael, Mary, Isaac, Elizabeth, Margaret, Sarah, Jacob, Amelia, Abraham, David, Susan.

Abraham Rohrer, son of John.

Abraham Rohrer, son-in-law of Daniel Mylin, W. Lampeter.

Abraham Rohrer, Manor, widow Esther m (2) John Lehman and had sons David and Daniel.

Abram Rohrer, widow d. 12 Sep 1843, children Esther m. John Leaman, Nancy m. John (or Jacob) Myers, Mary m. Jacob Witmer, Elizabeth m. Jacob Shellenberger or Shallenberger. (Note: many more later records for Rohrer not included here, but are in the card file. The card file for names “Rockenstein” to “Roth” includes 3253 cards in itself.) 63 files include French, all after 1800 except for Louisa French. The Lancaster, Pennsylvania, area is known for its Amish and Mennonite heritage. Over the course of many years, the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society has compiled more than 210,000 index cards with records of the Mennonite families in the region. Until recently, these cards were only available to researchers at the society’s library. Now, LMHS has partnered with Ancestry to digitize these cards. They are available on Ancestry as the Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Mennonite Vital Records, 1750-1940 collection. The cards were compiled from a number of sources, including family papers and diaries; cemetery records; periodicals; and county histories.

1768 Nov 3 – From the Maryland Gazette, Annapolis, Maryland, 3 Nov 1768, John Rohrer had a mare stolen from him.

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1768George French was working as a blacksmith in Frederick County, MD. From the U.S. Craftsperson Files, 1600-1995, a library card in alphabetical order and he is the only French.

From Deb [1]: About U.S., Craftperson Files, 1600-1995: The Winterthur Library is devoted to the study of everyday life in America and America’s craft traditions, including furniture making, silversmithing, pottery making, textile production, etc. This collection includes images of a series of card files containing the names, working dates, places of residence, and other information about American craftspeople. Data on the cards relate to a wide range of craftspeople: [it goes on to list different occupations] . . . Information on the cards includes the names of craftspeople, occupation and working dates, birth and death dates, where they lived, what they made, notes about their professional lives, and bibliographical and source references. (Information about furniture makers and silversmiths is more complete than other occupations, and some of the cards don’t include complete information.)

From the information above, I'd venture to guess that “w: stands for “working dates”. It's anybody's guess where the source for the info on the card came from, but it apparently means that George French was working as a blacksmith in Frederick County, Maryland in 1768. This does prove that George French died after 1768.

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1769 Mar 20 – Jacob French 2nd sold land to John Rohrer in Frederick County, MD. From Frederick County Court (Land Records, Index, Microfilm), Maryland, 1748-1778, MSA CE 109-1.

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1769 Mar 20George French sold his last land in Frederick County, MD also to John Rohrer as his brother Jacob French 2nd did and exactly on the same day (see 1749 list of deeds above). From Frederick County Court (Land Records, Index, Microfilm), Maryland, 1748-1778, MSA CE 109-1. George French died probably in 1772.

1769 Aug 2 -- William A. Snively, 21, in disagreement with the Schnebele Bachtel, 6, had Louisa French as John Schnebele’s wife. This was supported by a 2 August 1769 deed from John Snively to his stepmother, Barbara Snively. In the deed Louisa Snively, John’s wife, released her dower rights to the property he had received from his father, Jacob Snively. See Cumberland Co. PA Land Record, Vol, 1, Book D: 95-97. One month later John Schnebele had “Warm Weather”, a 313-acre tract along the Antietam surveyed which included Huckleberry Hall, a 100-acre tract originally surveyed to Jacob French 2nd in 1759, as his father Jacob French 1st had died in 1755. When John Schnebele sold this tract to Mennonist Jacob Guth (Good) in 1772, his wife Louisa (French) Schnebele released her dower rights, see Tracey, s.v. “Warm Weather.” Frederick County, LRLB P: 518, 519.

1769 Aug 28 -- John Snabley/Schnebley recorded the following land transaction which was made on 22 Aug 1769 between Jacob French 2nd for £52 sells parcel called Huckleberry Hall in Washington County containing 53 acres. Jacob French 2nd signed the document in German script before Thos Prather, and in German Script Daniel Snider. Receipt. Magdalena wife of Jacob French 2nd released dower rights. Alienation fine paid. From Federick County Land Abstracts of Maryland, Liber M 1768-1770, p 49, 466-467. John Schnebley was married to Louisa (French) Schnebley. See FFA Chart #30. His sister Magdalena Snively was married to Jacob French 2nd.

1769 Aug 28 Jacob French 2nd sold land to John Schnebely in Frederick County, MD. From Frederick County Court (Land Records, Index, Microfilm), Maryland, 1748-1778, MSA CE 109-1.

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1769 Sep 5 -- John and Louisa (French) Snively removed to Frederick Co., MD, near Hancock and the Pennsylvania line. Here John Snively purchased a 313-acre plantation, “Fair Weather” or “Warm Weather” on Sept 5 1769. He also changed the spelling of his name to Snevely, the more common spelling in Maryland, although the next generation changed it back to Snively.

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1769 Sep 23 – Jacob French 2nd sold land to Paul Rhode in Frederick County, MD. From Frederick County Court (Land Records, Index, Microfilm), Maryland, 1748-1778, MSA CE 109-1.

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1769 – George French – list of the lands he bought or sold.

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1770 Jun 25 – Jacob French 2nd sold land in Frederick County, MD, to Andrew Evey. From Frederick County Court (Land Records, Index, Microfilm), Maryland, 1748-1778, MSA CE 109-1.

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1770 Jun 25 -- Magdalena Snively, wife of Jacob French 2nd, relinquished dower rights when her husband sold much of his land to Andrew Avey on 25 Jun 1770. (FCMD Land Records, Liber N p 29). Henry Avey or Eaub or Eavey or Eby or Evey was naturalized in 1747 with George French, the brother of Jacob French 2nd. Henry Avey was b. ca. 1702 in Switzerland, married Elizabeth in 1721 in Switzerland, wrote his will on 2 Mar 1763 in Frederick Co., MD, and d. 25 Apr 1763. Henry Avey’s daughter, Lisabetha, married George French. Ancestry.com indicates that Lisabetha Avey was born in 1724 in Bern, Switzerland, the child of Henry and Elizabeth Avey, and that she married George French in 1748. Henry Avey’s son, Andrew Avey, bought much of George French’s land when George died in 1772 in Frederick County, VA.

LAND ON THE ANTIETAM

Andrew Avey, in 1770, purchased 50 acres from Jacob French 2nd called “Dry Land” in Frederick County near a tract of land called “Out Lett” (MSA 1770).

Andrew Eavey bought from Jacob French 2nd “Huckleberry Hall”, on a draft of the Antietam called Dickton, circa. 1771 (Fred. Co., Md. 1771-72).

Andrew Eavey sold to Jacob French 2nd 50 acres of “Out Lett”, west of Margaret Webb's land called “Darlings Sale”. Andrew's wife, Magdalena, relinquished her dower rights to the land. (Fred. Co., Md. 1771-72)

In 1772, Jacob Snebley sold a part of “The Resurvey of Cold Weather” and part of “Huckleberry Hall”. (Fred. Co., Md. 1772)

“Huckleberry Hall” was patented by Daniel Dulany on December 5, 1742 and included 100 acres. “Darlings Sale” was patented by John Charlton on October 26, 1752 and included 420 acres.

1770 Jun 25 -- Andrew Eavey recorded, made 20 Jun 1770 between Jacob French 2nd of Frederick County, for £150 sells a tract of land called “Dry Land” in Frederick County near a tract of land called “Out Lett” or “Out Lot” (MSA 1770) eastward of Margaret Webb's land called “Darling's Sale”, containing 50 acres, made June 1770, part of Huckleberry Hall, on a draft of the Antietam called Dickston’s, containing 43 acres. Signed Jacob French in German Script before Charles Jones, Evan Shelby, Receipt. Acknowledgement Magdalena, wife of Jacob French 2nd, relinquished dower rights. From Frederick County Maryland Land Records, Liber N, page 29, 207-209. From “The Cultural Resources of the Avey Family”. Andrew Eavey (or Eaub or Eby or Evey) was born 1750 in PA and his son, Andrew Avey, was born in 1768 [32]. What happened to Magdalena after this time?

The German name “Eavey” was originally spelled “Ävey” as the umlaut “a” has the sound of “ea”.

Andrew Eaby: Sharpsburg Hundred At the request of Andrew Eavey, the following deed was recorded on the 25th day of June, 1770. “Towits, this indenture made the 20th day of June in the year of our Lord 1770, between Jacob French 2nd of the County of Frederick and the Province of Maryland of the one part, to Andrew Eavey of the County and Province aforesaid, of the other part… In consideration of the sum 150 pounds current money…part of a tract of land called Huckleberry Hall situated and being in the county and Province aforesaid on a draft of Antietam called Dicktons.” {Frederick County Courthouse, Liber N, Folil 207-207} Patriotic people from this area were some of the first to demonstrate on a county-wide basis for independence. On January 4, 1775, Andrew Eaby represented the Conoccocheague Hundred at a meeting held in Fredericktown concerning the formation and arming of militia. Andrew may have been related to an armorer from the French and Indian Wars named Thomas Eaby. That man was active from Fort Cumberland, west to Fort Ligonier and Fort Pitt. On 22 May 1780 Thomas Eaby “produced a discharge signed by Adam Stephen, Colonel of the First Virginia Regiment, for the Service of Thomas Eaby as an artificer for the time of his enlistment in the late War between Great Britain and France.” {Yohogania County, Virginia Court Records, p. 410}. For additional information see, Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

From Vicki, Ref. [32]: I think it is interesting that Jacob French 2nd in 1770, split Huckleberry Hall, selling 1/2 to brother-in-law John Snively, and the other parcel to Andrew Eaby, notable riflemaker. Andrew may have been related to Thomas Eaby, an armorer from the French and Indian Wars. If you recall, Henry Eaby was signed with George Rogers Clark as a blacksmith and armorer. On this land is currently in 2012 a very old Irish cottage which could have been where Jacob French lived.

1770-1774 Provincial Court Land Records, 1770-1774, mentions “George’s Mistake”, “Venture”, and the “Barrens” containing 485 acres being mortgaged to Barnabas Hughes and afterwards released to his sons Daviel Hughes and Samuel Hughes by George French. See http://aomol.net/000001/000726/html/am726--449.html. See also  http://www.frenchfamilyassoc.com/FFA/CHARTS/Chart195/LandPatentOwnersWashCo1730-1830.pdf. Today the Hughes Forge and mill on the Antietam have been destroyed.

1770 Jun 25 -- From the Frederick County Land Record Abstracts, Liber M and Liber N.  Liber N page 29 - 206-207 Andrew Eavey recorded 25 June 1770.....between Jacob French of Frederick County , for 150 pounds sells a tract of land, part of Huckleberry Hall, on a draft of Antietam Called Dikston's, containing 46 acres. Signed Jacob French in German Script before Charles Jones, Evan Shelby, Receipt. Acknowledgement. Magdalena wife of Jacob French released dower.

1771 Jul 11 The newspaper article below is from The Maryland Gazette, Annapolis, Maryland, 11 Jul 1771. From Vicki [32]: From Architectural and Historic Treasures of Washington County, MD -- this book doesn't include land for Martin Funk or Peter French.....interesting because it does for at least ten other Funk’s. Jacob and Henry Funk came to the area in 1749. Martin Funk buys land from Peter French, which was found not to be the quantity he had bought.

1770 Aug 11 – French’s Contrivance William Deakins, Jr. in Western Maryland [189].

1771 -- Andrew Eavey bought from Jacob French “Huckleberry Hall”, on a draft of the Antietam called Dicktoms, circa. 1771 (Fred. Co., Md. 1771-72). From “The Cultural Resources of the Avey Family” https://archive.org/stream/TheCulturalResourcesOfTheAveyFamilyPhase1/CulturalResourcesOfTheAveyFamilyPhase11985_djvu.txt1771 – Andrew Avey sold to Jacob French 50 acres of “Out Lett”, west of Margaret Webb's land called "Darlings Sale". Andrew's wife, Magdalena, relinquished her dower rights to the land. (Fred. Co., Md. 1771-72). From “The Cultural Resources of the Avey Family” https://archive.org/stream/TheCulturalResourcesOfTheAveyFamilyPhase1/CulturalResourcesOfTheAveyFamilyPhase11985_djvu.txt

1771 -- Tax record book of 1771 in Frederick County next to Jacob French 2nd is written "gone to VA” – he probably meant West Virginia and Berkeley County. A Jacob Reager had the same notation next to his name........[32]. Lived in Spring Mills in a log cabin. By “gone to VA”, Jacob probably meant he was moving to Frederick Co., VA. A Michael Creager had the same notation next to his name........ [Jacob Reager was born in 1740 in VA] [32]. The Reager family was from Switzerland and arrived in PA in 1737.

1771 -- Jacob French 2nd migrated to Berkeley Co., WV, at least by 1771, having lived prior to that in Frederick and Washington counties, Maryland [32].     

1771 -- George French paid back to the estate of Isaac Zane. After this date George French cannot be found, but his son George French removed to SC ca. 1790. Legal Papers, 1771-1772 Box: 1 folder: 29...
Account, March-July 1771, George French to Isaac Zane. 2 p. Also, Execution, 1 April 1772, to any sworn officer of Frederick County. Fi. Fa. to attach estate of George French. Isaac Zane v. George French. 2 p. See http://ead.lib.virginia.edu/vivaead/published/lva/vi01107.component.

1771 Aug 1 -- Frederick County, Virginia, Deed, Book 15, Pages 129 & 130 Lease and (Release) - 1 August 1771, James & Ann (his wife) Davis, late of Frederick Co., Virginia, leases to Jacob French, of Frederick Co., Virginia, for 5 shillings (200 pounds)... 186 acres which is part of 1175 acres, granted to James Davis Sr., 12 November 1735, and left to said James Davis, by the will of James Davis Sr... corner to Jacob Davis...corner to the 14 acres of Jacob Strope. Signed James Davis and Ann Davis, in the presence of John Davis, John Champion and George Michael Sanlinger.

1771 Aug 1 -- Frederick County, Virginia, Deed Book 15, page 129, 1 Aug 1771, [Lease] Between James Davis and Ann his wife late of Frederick County to Jacob French of the same County... consideration of 5 Shillings... one parcel or part of a Tract of Land... Containing 1175 granted to James Davis Sen the 12th Nov 1735 and was left to said James Davis by his Father James Davis Sen in the Last Will and Testament... Containing 186 Acres more or less... Yielding and Paying rent of one Pepper Corn on 29th day of Sept if lawfully demanded... James Davis. Witnesses: John Davis. John Champion, George Michl Lambinger. Recorded 8 Aug 1771.

1771 Aug 1 -- Frederick County, Virginia, Deed Book 15, page 132, 1 Aug 1771, [Lease] Between James Davis late of Frederick County & Ann his wife to Jacob French of Colony aforesaid... Consideration of 5 Shillings... one piece or part of a Tract of Land... containing 420 Acres granted unto said James Davis the 16th Oct 1762... Corner to Jacob Strope 14 Acres Survey Purchased of James Davis... Corner to James Davis & John Davis in the line of James Davis Sen Tract... Containing 14 Acres more or less... Yielding and Paying one Pepper Corn on the 29th day of Sept. if same be demanded.  James Davis. Witnesses: John Davis, Jno Champion, G Michl Lambinger. Recorded 8 Aug 1771.

Frederick County, Virginia, Deed, Book 15, Pages 129 & 130 Lease and (Release) - 1 August 1771, James & Ann (his wife) Davis, late of Frederick Co., Virginia, leases to Jacob French, of Frederick Co., Virginia, for 5 shillings (200 pounds)... 186 acres which is part of 1175 acres, granted to James Davis Sr., 12 November 1735, and left to said James Davis, by the will of James Davis Sr... corner to Jacob Davis...corner to the 14 acres of Jacob Strope. Signed James Davis and Ann Davis, in the presence of John Davis, John Champion and George Michael Sanlinger.

1771 Aug 2 -- Frederick County, Virginia, Deed Book 15, page 130, 2 Aug 1771, [Release] Between James Davis & Ann his wife of Frederick County to Jacob French of the other part... consideration of 200 pounds... 186 acres... James Davis. Ann Davis. Witnesses: John Davis. John Champion, George Michl Lambinger. Recorded 8 Aug 1771.

1771 Aug 2 -- Frederick County, Virginia, Deed Book 15, page 133, 2 Aug 1771, [Release] Between James Davis and Ann his wife of Frederick County to Jacob French of the other part... consideration of 28 pounds... 14 acres... James Davis, Ann Davis. Witnesses: John Davis, Jno Champion, G Michl Lambinger. Recorded 8 Aug 1771.

1771 -- Jacob French 2nd, lived in Frederick Co., VA, is mentioned along with George French, his brother, and with Henry French, another brother. He bought a large tract of land in which is now in Hedgesville, Berkeley Co., WV. Prior to 1771, Jacob lived in Frederick and Washington Counties, Maryland – the boundaries changed a lot in those days from Maryland to Virginia [32].

1772 -- Berkeley County, formed from Frederick in 1772. Named for Norborne Berkeley. Home of many leaders in the Revolution. As early as 1774, George Washington had orchards planted here. Berkeley County was taken in part from the County of Frederick, Virginia and made its historic entry as a county on 15 May 1772, just the year after Jacob French 2nd acquired land there in 1771. Besides Frederick County, Berkeley County also took in present Jefferson County until 1801, which was part of Orange County, VA in 1738. Orange County was from the vast territory of Spotsylvania County, VA, in 1734.

1771-72 -- Land records, book N: 206-207, date unknown. Jacob French to Andrew Eavey /Andrew Eavey to Jacob French. Frederick County courthouse, Frederick, Maryland. From “The Cultural Resources of the Avey Family” https://archive.org/stream/TheCulturalResourcesOfTheAveyFamilyPhase1/CulturalResourcesOfTheAveyFamilyPhase11985_djvu.txt1772 --  Jacob French was on the Rent Role of Berkeley Co., VA.

1772 Jacob French 2nd appears on the Rent Rolls in the VA Early Census Index of Berkeley County, VA.

1772 Nov 24 – Jacob Snebly sold land to Andrew Avey, Frederick County courthouse, Frederick, Maryland. From “The Cultural Resources of the Avey Family” https://archive.org/stream/TheCulturalResourcesOfTheAveyFamilyPhase1/CulturalResourcesOfTheAveyFamilyPhase11985_djvu.txt1772 --  Legal Papers, 1772 Box: 1 folder: 30...Execution, 1 April 1772, to any sworn officer of Frederick County. Fi. Fa. to attach estate of George French. Isaac Zane v. George French. 2 p. See http://ead.lib.virginia.edu/vivaead/published/lva/vi01107.component.

1772 -- George French, Frederick Co., Virginia sold a horse to his brother Jacob French 2nd, sold cows to another brother Henry French, and a horse to David Lammon. David Lammon, was from Shenandoah Co., VA, and later Washington Co., TN, was the father of Joseph Lamon, mentioned in FFA Chart #10. George Lamon, John Lamon, Mary Lamon, Thomas Lamon, and William M. Lamon are listed in the 1830 census of Berkeley Co., VA. Elizabeth French who m. Joseph Lamon on 23 Oct 1805 in Greene Co., TN, is shown as the sister of Henry French. Joseph Lamon was b. ca. 1785 in Washington Co., TN. Emanuel Lamon, b. 1789, m. Mary French of this same family in TN.

1772 Apr 4 --  A sale of livestock by George French Sen. backsmith in Frederick County, VA. Amelia C. Gilreath, comp., Frederick County, Virginia Deed Books 15 and 16 1771-1775, (Nokesville, VA: P.p., 1992) p. 71. Bk. 15, p. 363 - 10 April 1772 Know all men by these presents that I George French, Sen., blacksmith, in Frederick County … for and in consideration of one hundred and fifty five pound’s thirteen Shillings paid by Jacob French, miller in County aforesaid … have bargained and sold … a dirk Bay Horse now in the custody of Lewis Stephen’s … a gray Horse in the possession of Henry French and 2 milk cows and one Calf … 2 year old calf and puter and Iron pots in possession of Alexander Campbell … a site (sic) of Black Smith Tools … etc …

Wit: John Barnes (he d. 1822 in VA, spouse Sarah Carter)
George French
John Nighewanger (or Niewanger or Nyswander, b. 1729, m. Magdalena Cupp*)
John (JL) Larrick (he d. 4 Jun 1782 in Frederick Co., VA, spouse Mary)
Recorded: 5 Aug. 1772 Lloyd De Witt Bockstruck, compiler, Virginia's Colonial Soldiers, (Baltimore: Gen. Pub., Inc., 1988)

*”A” Magdalene Capp was a sponsor for the baptism of Catharine Fornwaet on 26 Dec 1779 in Lancaster County, PA, at the First Reformed Congregational Church.

It appears as if George French is selling various items to Jacob French 2nd, including items owned by George but in the possession of Henry French, Alexander Campbell, and Lewis Stephens in 1772. 

It would seem as though George French was not dying or else he would have willed these items to his wife and children, but perhaps they were planning to move to Greenville, SC, where they are found in 1784. Or, I perhaps George was going to move out of Frederick Co., VA. Jacob, George, and Henry French were brothers and they all lived in Frederick Co., VA, in 1772 -- all of the same generation, b. ca. 1750-1755. 

Henry French could have been the one who moved to Mercer Co. KY ca. 1773, only the following year and he also would have not needed the 2 milk cows and 1 calf, etc. sold to Jacob French. Jacob would have stayed in VA. George was probably the blacksmith who moved to Greenville, SC, but not until 1784. George French and Jacob French acquired their father's 200-acre plantation in 1785. Jacob died in WV in 1826.   

Now the problem is that both Jacob and George appear in the 1810 census of Berkeley Co., WV. Jacob had 9 people in his household and George had 10 people. Which George is this?

This leads me to believe that there were 2 men named George French. It is curious that George French is mentioned above with Sen. after his name, but the others do not have a senior. Perhaps there was a George French Jr. already born by 1772.

Lewis Stevens, 1713 - 1802, m. Maria Christina Rittenhouse (probably originally the German name Rittenhaus), lived in VA. Lewis Stevens' father was Peter Stephens, 1687-1757, an immigrant originally from Heidelberg, Germany. Peter Stephens immigrated in 1722 at age 35. They came to the Valley of Virginia after spending some years outside Philadelphia, PA. The chief among these Germans was Jost Hite (1685-1761) who bought land in Shenandoah Valley, in what is today the central and southern part of Frederick Co., VA. Lewis built a house and mill on Cedar Creek. The Hite family owned Teter French's house in Berkeley Co., WV -- this is from FFA Chart #195.   

Alexander Campbell (mentioned above) was b. ca. 1750 in Scotland, who resided in 1850 in Cumberland, NC, age 100, as per the 1850 census. Another reference shows he was b. 1744 in Scotland, immigrated in 1753 age 9 to Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania, lived in Winchester, Frederick Co., VA, in 1779, age 35, and moved to TN, then Crab Orchard, KY, by 1785, dying in 1786. This information provides an indication as to possible French places and dates; however, no French is listed in “A Dictionary of Scottish Emigrants to the U.S.A. by Donald Whyte” as Alexander Campbell is. On another page is an indenture by George French, his wife, and others in 1798, where the 220 acres is described " being the whole of the plantation in the possession of the said Jacob French dec'd and on which he lived at the time of his death and purchased by him in his life time of a certain Edward Davis and James Davis...." (This George French must have been George’s first son. Furthermore, Edward Davis is the one who moved to Mercer Co., KY with Henry French of FFA Chart #31; the DNA of both George French and Henry French’s families match.)

1772 -- The Tullises Branch is a branch of Harlan Run from present-day Hedgesville, Berkeley Co., WV, eastward for 1 1/3 miles. For more information on Edward Davis, see http://gwwgen.com/mytree/zzzg16.htm. Berkeley Co., VA, Land Record.

1772 -- Berkeley County, Virginia, Deeds, Book 1, Page 211. Also see http://gwwgen.com/mytree/zzzg09.htm. This Indenture made the August 2, 1772, between Edward Davis and Mary his wife of Frederick County, Virginia of the one part and Jacob French of the same county and colony of the other part... for and in consideration of 5 pounds... one certain piece, parcel or part of a tract of land lying and being in Frederick County, Virginia being part of a tract of land containing 1,175 acres granted to James Davis Sr, November 12, 1735 and left to him the said, Edward Davis by his father James Davis Sr in his last will and testament... Beginning at a marked hickory a corner to the said Edward Davis and James Davis then with their lines S 15 W 95 poles to a stone in the place of their corner and corner to Peter Hedges (see Peter Hedges, Records of Wills, Frederick Co., Md.) then with Edward Davis and Peter Hedges line N 75 W 34 poles to a stake on the line then leaving the line and moving N 15 E 95 poles to 2 hickories and a black saplings then S 75 E 34 poles to the beginning containing 20 acres more or less... This deed is also mentioned in Berkeley County, Court Orders, Book 1, page 35. Berkeley Co., VA, Land Record.

The Hedges family lived in Berkeley Co., WV, which was originally Frederick Co., MD or VA. They were friends of the French family. See Hedges Family and their migration to Maryland and Virginia. William Hedges was b. ca. 1650 in Berkshire, England and immigrated to New Castle Co., DE. Peter Hedges was b. ca. 1717 and d. ca. 1791. Peter Hedges resided in Maryland in that part that became Virginia, and in 1777 it became Berkeley Co., WV, at the same time as Jacob French. Joshua Hedges was b. 1714 and d. before 12 Feb 1790 in Berkeley Co., WV. Joshua purchased land from Edward Davis. Peter Hedges was Joshua’s first cousin.

Edward Davis, a personal and business friend of Jacob French, was probably the son of Edward Davis who was b. ca. 1707 in Wales and died before 10 Apr 1738 in Orange Co., VA. Edward’s brother was James Davis and they both lived in Berkeley Co., WV. For more information, see http://gwwgen.com/mytree/zzzg16.htm. 

1772 -- George French was granted a tract “Resurvey on George’s Mistake, George’s Venture, and the Barrens” totaling 1476 acres. From Deb, Ref. [1]: George French (owner of Old Forge Farm) was found in legal records in 1772 and he was alive at that time, but probably died in Apr 1772.

1772 Apr – George French may have died, gone to VA or NC/SC, but some kind of estate settlement in MD or VA would have been found if he had died. Or, there could have been two men named George French confusing the issue.

1772 May 29/30 -- Many times I’ve run across the name John French in Colebrookdale Township, Berks County, PA, and skipped it or filed it under Chart #166 as I thought he was British, but now I find he was naturalized, according to “Denizations and Naturalizations in the British Colonies in America, 1607-1775, page 115 of 368 pages. He was naturalized on 29/30 May 1772. I wonder who this is? Could it be the John French who died in Hagerstown in 1787? It is amazing that the date of May 1772 is exactly the month after Apr 1772 when records for George French disappear. See http://interactive.ancestry.com/49119/FLHG_DeniNaturBritishColonAmerica-0226/25013?backurl=http://person.ancestry.com/tree/13726403/person/114960343/facts/citation/4699472090/edit/record#?imageId=FLHG_DeniNaturBritishColonAmerica-0115.

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Migration South to Kentucky, Tennessee, and North and South Carolina

1773 -- Henry French, the son of Jacob French 2nd, removed to Mercer County, Kentucky, FFA Chart #31.

1773 – John Snybly -- Resurvey on Tonoloway Lick, Washington County, MD.

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‪From the Pennsylvania Genealogical Magazine and the Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 2. Many disputes in this area occurred between the state line of Pennsylvania and Maryland known as the Maxon-Dixon Line. Eve Schnebly paid taxes on Tonoloway Lick of 238 acres in Washington County, Maryland.

1773 Apr 26Jacob French 2nd sold land to Andrew Evey in Frederick County, MD. From Frederick County Court (Land Records, Index, Microfilm), Maryland, 1748-1778, MSA CE 109-1.

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1774 Jun 11 – Perhaps Martha French, wife of Jacob French 1st, died (that is, if Jacob’s unproven wife were really Martha). The 48-acre piece of land in Greencastle* (just east of Conococheague Creek), next to John Snively’s land, went to Henry Snively in 1774. (Lancaster Warrant Register, page 66 in Pennsylvania.). Henry Snively was the eldest son and first child of Jacob Schnebele and Barbara Eberly (she was his second wife). Jacob Schnebele’s first wife is unknown, but in that marriage they had the children connected to the French family as son John Snively m. Louisa French and daughter Magdalene Snively m. Jacob French 2nd. There were many descendants named Henry Snively, but this Henry was born 1738 in Antrim and died in 1802 and seems to be the next in line to inherit the 48-acre piece of land in 1774. Henry was then 36 years old. Henry was from the second marriage of Jacob Schnebele, whereas John and Magdalene were from the first marriage.

From Vicki [32]: From Lancaster County, PA Deed Abstracts compiled by Thomas Mayhill: “In pursuance of a Warrant dated the 15th day of June, 1748 there was surveyed for Jacob French 2nd a certain tract of land called Lubec: in Antrim township in the county of Cumberland ,” (Followed by a description of the property, Hickory trees and all)”. “And whereas the Said Jacob French 2nd in and by a certain Deed Poll dated the 17th day of October 1763 granted the same unto Henry Snively of Antrim township yeoman in fee.”  It goes on to indicate that Henry Snively paid seven pounds six shillings lawful money....witnessed 17th day of April, 1774.  Signed by John Penn  “Recorded 11th June 1773.”

Because Jacob French 1st died ca. 1755, perhaps his wife Martha was living on the land until she died, perhaps in 1774, as Jacob French 2nd was already living in Maryland at this time.

*Greencastle was named after Greencastle, County Donegal, Ireland, and founded in 1782 by John Allison.

1774 Apr 13 Jacob French 2nd appears to have sold 50 acres of land in Lancaster County which he bought in 1748. This land definitely describes the land he bought on 15 Jun 1748 mentioned above, also 50 acres, adjoining his named neighbors.

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1774 --  Certificate from Lord Dunmore that Samuel French is entitled to 200 acres for service as a sergeant, which he desires to locate in Botetourt County, Virginia, 29 May 1774. Assigned to Thomas Stuart. Berkeley County [West] Virginia Tax List A James Wilson, Commissioner p. 1403. Adam French with one cow. p. 1404 Jacob French 1 slave under sixteen (therefore born after 1758, oo6 horses and 8 cows Geo. shows Jacob charged with tax J[acob]., Jr. shows Jacob charged with tax Henr

Berkeley County Tax List B Thomas Hart Commissioner p. 1424. William French two horses and 5 cows p. 1440. The commissioner was required to note the day he visited each taxpayer. This makes it possible to rearrange the lists and determine probable neighbors. List A 3/30 Adam French 

5/24 
George French
Heny French
J. Jr. Jacob.

5/28
William French

John Frederick Dorman, Editor The Virginia Genealogist, Volume 8, 1964. (Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, Inc., 1993) Berkeley County, (West) Virginia 1800 Tax List William Slaughter, Junr. 
George French [Back Creek] 1 adult male and 4 horses
Jacob French [Stephens Neck] 2 males 6 horses

Not sure if this family of Botetourt County is the same family. I don’t recognize the names “Back Creek” nor “Stephen’s Neck”. In the book “Virginia’s Colonial Soldiers” by Lloyd DeWitt Bockstruck, copyright 1988, 443 pages, these men are described as follows:

Samuel French, 1 Dec 1754 date of enlistment, Fairfax, 27, 5’10”, sawyer, Maryland, black complexion, black curled hair, in the Size Roll of Capt. Mercer’s Company on 2 Aug 1756, which calculates his birth date as 1729.

William French, 32, 5’8”, schoolmaster, England, Augusta, brown, spare good limbs, dark brown hair.

As Lord Dunmore helped the slaves, these Frenches could have all been black and could have been connected to FFA Chart #12 or #36.

1775-1783 -- Revolutionary War. Before the Revolutionary War, most land in Berkeley Co., WV, had either been sold through the early patents or granted by Lord Fairfax. Most owners were Pennsylvania Dutch German settlers of Lutheran/Reformed or Presbyterian faith. Then came the Quakers. After the war, a change took place; Land disputes drove out the Quakers. For details, see Historic Resources of Berkeley County, West Virginia, by Don C. Wood, Genealogist, Historian, Historic Archeologist.

1775 Mar 1 -- The largest land grant in the present Chewsville District was "Resurvey on George's Mistake," George's Venture, and the Barrens" totaling 1476 acres, and present village of Chewsville was approximately in the center of this tract, but slightly more to the south and west of the village. This tract was granted to George French March 1, 1775.

1776 Sep 6 -- The western portions of Maryland (including present Washington County) were incorporated into Prince George's County in 1696. This original county included six current counties. The first to be created was Frederick, separated from Prince George's County in 1748. Washington County was formed on September 6, 1776 by the division of Frederick County. Henry Schnebly lived in this area at that time as he was a delegate.

1776 Dec 22Peter French married Mary Karm or Harrn or Harr on 22 Dec 1776 at the Evangelical Lutheran Congregational Church of Middletown, Frederick County, Maryland, residing on the “Lincken Ohr” (Lingamore). Proclaimed Dec 8, 13, 22. Married Dec 22, 1776. Witnesses: Edmann Imann, John Wolf and his sister Catharina. Margreth French of the same family married John Randol on 8 Sep 1778 at the same church by Mr. Henop, witnesses Christoph Willen, Daniel Al, John Shipton, and Margreth Garden from “Frederick, Maryland Lutheran Marriages and Burials 1743 – 1811” translated by Frederick Sheely Weiser. Most likely, Randol should be Randall. Did Peter French marry Catherina Mong thereafter?

1779 John French is listed in the 1779 Tax and exoneration Schedule of Hanover, Lancaster, PA, with 175 ½ acres of land, 1 negro, 2 horses, 4 cows.

1779 George French appears on the Rent Role of Fredericksburg County, VA. Could be George’s son??

1781 -- PATISON, ARCHIBALD (Cambridge) to HOLLIDAY, CLEMENT.
Dates: 1781, Apr. 26.
Pertaining to case of French & Co.
MSA S999-7-458 MdHR 19990-06-02/05  Location: 1/7/3/19 (Maryland State Papers, confiscated British Property Paper)

1781 -- Andrew Snively was b. 1751, d. 1813, m1. Anna Funk dying in 1788, m2. Mary Magdalena Shenk d. Oct 1830.

Andrew Snively’s home, built in 1781 in Antrim twp, Franklin Co., PA, on the site of his father’s, Jacob Snively, log cabin built ca. 1735. It is a two-story limestone house, just around the corner from the Jacob French 2nd, 48-acre farm from 1748 (see this information under 1748). Andrew Snively’s father was Jacob Snively, father of Magdalena Snively who married Jacob French 2nd, and of John Snively who married Louisa French, and then 14 others, including Andrew Snively, by his second wife Barbara Eberly. Jacob French 2nd and Louisa French were siblings. This house is next to a creek and is in lovely condition and is at 763 Zarger Road just off Old Grindstone Hill Road in Shady Grove, Antrim Twp., Franklin Co. (then western Lancaster Co.), PA, just east of present Greencastle. Below, then and now.

Description: AndrewSnively

In 1781, Andrew and Susan Snively built this limestone house at 763 Zarger Road, which is about three-tenths of a mile off Grindstone Hill Road. The view from the front of the house overlooks the spring, where a springhouse still stands. Andrew’s father, Jacob Snively, was one of the earliest settlers in Antrim Township and owned thousands of acres of land. The name Snively evolved from the surname Schnebele.

 

Description: SnivelyHomestead

Photos taken by Mark Ryan from website: http://www.skylineppa.org/sppafall07nl3.pdf which contains a lot of genealogical material about the Snively family.

Description: SnivelyHomestead2

His initials and date are carved in mortar I suppose on the eves of the stone house as "S" for Shively, and A & S 1781 for Andrew and his wife Susannah as they were married in 1775.

Description: ZargerRd

The Andrew Shively home is on Zarger Rd. at the far left, the house with the two chimneys, built in 1781. The front of the white limestone house faces a creek. The family enters the house from the back. They are Mennonites and their vehicles are black. If you walk past the creek and look across Zarger Rd. there is a wonderful old traditional barn. I believe it was once in the Snively family as well [37].

This limestone house was built on the site of Andrew Shively’s father’s (Jacob Snively) log house, which was built shortly after 1731 when his Jacob Snively purchased a total of 1,500 acres of land in 1734 and 1735. Both of Jacob Snively’s first two children by this first wife lived in the log house; John Snively who married Louisa French, and Magdalena Snively who married Jacob French.

Further down on Zarger Rd. is the Antrim Mennonite Church (newly built).

Description: AntrimBICCem

1782 -- George French moved to NC before moving to SC by 1800? Is this correct?

State of North Carolina 
To the Sherriff of Lincoln County 
Greetings, you are herby commanded to Summon Philip Earhart, Martin Keener, George Fink, Lemal Sanders, Robert Johnston, Thomas Anderson, Senor; Henry Slinkard, Adam Dyke, George Heager, Jacob Sits, George Sits, Abraham Earhart, Adam Killyon, George Romener, Peter Linebarger, Fredrick Heager, Thomas Beaty, James Cronester, Philip Cloonenger, Michal Cloninger, George French, Arther Bynam, Gilbert Bynam, Peter Finger, Senor; Michal Ingle, Michal Miller, Peter Snyder, Ritchard Beel, Sherod Stroud, Henry Hoover, Christian Syke, John Shegal, John Binnom, Lenard Killon, John Beel Jun'r, David Abernethy Jun'r, George Dick, James Reed, David Hutchason, Gasper Club, John Saylor, John Stroud Sen,r, John Stroud Jun,r, Simon Hager Sen,r, ______ to be and appear before the Justice of the County Cour of pleas and Quarter sessions to be held in and for the County at the Court Hous on the first Monday in January next to shew caws if any they have why their Estate Shall not be Deemed forfeited, given under our hand this 21st Day of December 1782.

Thomas Espey Com.

at the same time Summons Jacob Forney Sen,r, John Bowers, Ann Brown, Sussannah Forney Sen,r, Elezabeth Wamack, James Ross, Meary Elexander, Meary Walker, Meary Morrison, Esther King, Abner Wamack, Robert Caruthers, to be and appear before the Justices of the County Court of pleas to give Evadance in behalf of the State Philip Earhart, Abraham Earhart and others.

On the back of the citation is the following:

Philip Earhart & Martin Keener in the Conental forces under M.J. Green. Thomas Anderson in Burke County. John Shegal not found. Adam Dyke, Adam Killyon, Fredrick Heager, Michal Ingle, Henry Hoover, & James Cronaster is gon with the enemay & Nicholas Holderman was summoned by Wm. Armstrong Constable, & the remainder is Summoned. Meary Walker is in Meklinburg county, The remainder of the Evadances is Summoned.

Joseph Henry H.S.F.

1782 Sep 19 -- Lincoln County Sept 19, 1782 To the Sherrff of Lincoln County you are hereby commanded to take

Next Citation:

State vs. Supposed Torys

State of North Carolina

To the Sherriff of Lincoln County

Greetings, you are herby commanded to Summon Philip Earhart, Martin Keener, George Fink, Lemal Sanders, Robert Johnston, Thomas Anderson, Senor; Henry Slinkard, Adam Dyke, George Heager, Jacob Sits, George Sits, Abraham Earhart, Adam Killyon, George Romener, Peter Linebarger, Fredrick Heager, Thomas Beaty, James Cronester, Philip Cloonenger, Michal Cloninger, George French, Arther Bynam, Gilbert Bynam, Peter Finger, Senor; Michal Ingle, Michal Miller, Peter Snyder, Ritchard Beel, Sherod Stroud, Henry Hoover, Christian Syke, John Shegal, John Binnom, Lenard Killon, John Beel Jun'r, David Abernethy Jun'r, George Dick, James Reed, David Hutchason, Gasper Club, John Saylor, John Stroud Sen,r, John Stroud Jun,r, Simon Hager Sen,r, ______ to be and appear before the Justice of the County Cour of pleas and Quarter sessions to be held in and for the County at the Court Hous on the first Monday in January next to shew caws if any they have why their Estate Shall not be Deemed forfeited, given under our hand this 21st Day of December 1782. ---- This George may not be the son of Jacob 1st. The next George son of George, was born ca. 1749 in Virginia. By 1782, he was age 33. In 1794 “a” George is listed in Greenville County, SC.

1783 -- According to Ref. [71], “When the Revolutionary war ended and colonies officially became states, each state retained the rights and responsibilities of dispersing property within its own boundaries. Distribution often continued in the same manner as before the war.” The process was usually: application then issue of warrant (authorization to survey). Upon return of survey, the patent was prepared. The patent is an official title to the property and indicates completion of the land acquisition process. The term patent indicates the first sale of the property (as part of a state).

1783 – SNAVELY Family Maryland:
Conrod Snavely. Philpott Enlarged, pt, 300 acres. WA Lower Antietam and Sharpsburg p. 36. MSA S1161-11-1. 1/4/5/54
Henry Snavely. sundry tracts, 806 3/4 acres. WA Salisbury and Conocheague p. 48. MSA S1161-11-3. 1/4/5/54
Henry Snavely. Snavelys Success, 300 acres. WA Salisbury and Conocheague p. 48. MSA S1161-11-3. 1/4/5/54
Henry Snavely. 3 Houses & Lotts. WA Elizabeth p. 30. MSA S1161-11-4. 1/4/5/54
Henry Snavely. Scant of Timber, pt and Funks Land, pt, 649 acres. WA Elizabeth p. 30. MSA S1161-11-4. 1/4/5/54
Jacob Snavely. Blum Run, pt and Resurvey on Egypt, 92 acres. WA Salisbury and Conocheague p. 48. MSA S1161-11-3. 1/4/5/54
John Snavely. sundry tracts, 361 acres. WA Fort Frederick and Linton p. 52. MSA S1161-10-9. 1/4/5/53
John Snavely. Shoal Spring, 50 acres. WA Upper Antietam and Jerusalem p. 61. MSA S1161-10-9. 1/4/5/53
John Snavely. Snavelys Success, 163 acres. WA Salisbury and Conocheague p. 49. MSA S1161-11-3. 1/4/5/54
Michal Snavely. WA Fort Frederick and Linton p. 52. MSA S1161-10-9. 1/4/5/53
See 1783 Tax Assessments in Maryland: http://www.msa.md.gov/msa/stagser/s1400/s1437/html/1437wa.html.

1783 May 20 Jacob French was living in Berkeley County, VA, according to the following indenture: Berkeley County, Virginia, Deeds, Book 6, Page 130 - This Indenture made May 20, 1783 between Edward Davis of the County of Berkeley and State of Virginia and Mary his wife of the one part and John Turner of the same place of the other part... for and in consideration of 919 pounds and 15 shillings... situated by the side of North Mountain... part of a greater tract of 602 acres granted him [Edward Davis] by the proprietor of the Northern Neck of Virginia... Beginning at a locust stake corner to Jacob French and 34 poles from the original beginning and running, thence with said original line N 75 W 319 poles to a white oak near a hickory on the side of the mountain, thence N 23 E 180 poles to a locust stake, then leaving the original line and running S 69 E 310 poles to two white oaks in a line of the Original, thence with said line S 42 poles to a hickory corner to said land and to Jacob French's line N 75 W 34 poles to two hickories and a black oak sapling, thence S 15 W 94 poles to the beginning containing 319 acres more or less... This deed is also mentioned in Berkeley County, Virginia, Court Orders, Book 5, Page 131. Berkeley Co., VA, Land Record.

1785 (or there abouts) -- Mercer County, Kentucky, Deeds, Book 6, page 519 - Henry French and his wife Elizabeth of Mercer County, Kentucky, sold 410 acres for 164 pounds on the Dry Fork, corner to Jeremiah Briscoe to Edward Davis.

Preparing for the Death of Jacob French 2nd

1785 -- Jacob French 2nd made a land agreement in Washington County, MD, where Jacob signs with a mark . . . a “J” and an “F”. Documents provided by Vicki French Carroll [32] on her trip to Berkeley Co., WV, in March 2011. Jacob French had gone back to Washington County to buy these two pieces of land. He had sold his land in Berkeley to his sons in 1785, appraised in 1788, the year he died [32].

Linda French Dawson [11], analyzed the situation to mean that the person who made the application was George French and that the father, Jacob French 2nd, owned the property since 1769. So we need a 1769 deed check. It seems that an application by George French was in the works in 1775 and 1776 but not granted until 1790 because of the Revolutionary War. We know he had to be 21 in 1775 (or born in 1754 or before).

1785 -- An article written by Don Wood, the archivist in Berkeley County, WV, about Jacob says: “Jacob French lived on Tullises Branch on the west side of the run below the mill at Spring Mills. He turned over his 200-acre plantation to his two sons George and Jacob French in 1785, BCDB 8 (Berkeley County Deed Book), p. 348, but did not sell this plantation as he was living on it. They were also to pay so much to their two brothers John and Henry French and also their sisters (BCDB 8, p. 348). Apparently sons John and Henry did not remain in Berkeley County.”

Tullises Branch on Harlan Run also appears as “Tulisses”, “Tulusses”, “Tulis”, and “Tully’s” Branch. It is described as “the stream that lies at the foot of the mountain east of present Hedgeville”. Tullises was first in Orange County VA, later in Frederick County VA, then in Berkeley County VA, ca. 1738. The borders of Frederick Co. and Berkeley Co. changed in 1771. Berkeley County, VA, Land Record. Don Wood, the archivist in Berkeley County, WV, had told us (Vicki and her husband) earlier when we showed him the document saying Jacob was buying land in Washington County, that the signature was probably not his. That the only time you could count on the signature being real was if someone was selling, or signing a will or an Heirs Agreement. He also told us that some documents were lost when the Union Army marched through the area [32]. These two properties belonging to Jacob French (the father) totaled 37.75 acres:

Š      “Long Point” surveyed for Jacob French on 13 Jun 1785, received on 30 Jun 1785 – 13 ¾ acres. This land was examined on 1 Jul 1785 by William Brown, a Specialty Appointee. See website on Washington County Circuit Court Land Survey, Subdivision, and Condominium Plats: http://plato.mdarchives.state.md.us/msa/stagser/s1500/s1529/cfm/dsp_unit.cfm?county=wa&qualifier=S&series=1231&unit=210

Š      “Keep Secret” surveyed on 15 Dec 1786 by Jacob French 2nd – 24 acres in Washington Co., Maryland.

Description: LongPoint1

Description: LongPoint2

Description: LongPoint4

Description: LongPoint5

Description: LongPoint7

Description: KeepSecret1  Description: KeepSecret2
Description: KeepSecret3
Description: KeepSecret4
Description: KeepSecret5

From Vicki, Ref. [32]: The signatures of Jacob French in these two land contracts above are the same, except the second signatures looks more like it reads Jacob Funck. The historian, Don C. Wood, verified that these records were not filled out by Jacob French himself, but by a clerk. We have no signature for Jacob French. He signed “J F” on his Heirs Agreement.

Henry French of KY is Jacob French 2nd’s son. Jacob bought the land on the Tullis Run from James Davis, and he bought some from his brother Edward Davis. Soon after the last battle of the Revolution in Blue Licks, KY, Edward Davis, his wife, James Davis, and his wife moved to KY with a large group of about 500 people.  Edward Davis bought land from Henry French and his wife Elizabeth. Henry fought in the battle of Blue Licks. Henry’s lineage continues with FFA Chart #31.

From Mara: On Jacob’s 1788 will, he used a Mark and the signature was not his. Same for George French on this will. Jacob Schnebeli also died in 1788 and John French died the year before in 1787. Looking over the Agreement that Jacob French 2nd wrote in 1785 concerning his children, I find the following information

1785 Feb 8 – An Agreement was made between “French to French Jr.” as written in the left-hand border and his two sons, George French and Jacob French 3rd, should receive certain lands (220 acres). The Agreement also states that sons George and Jacob are to give their father Jacob 10 pounds yearly for the rest of his life. Upon Jacob’s death, the 2 brothers George and Jacob Jr. are to pay to their brothers John and Henry 100 Pounds. The Agreement also states that George and Jacob are to pay to each of their sisters or their heirs 50 pounds each.

Note: This Agreement shows that Jacob French 2nd, the father of these children, died before 17 Sep 1788 and this Agreement was proved on 20 Sep 1788, that Jacob had 4 sons listed probably in order of birth (George, Jacob Jr., Henry, John) and at least 2 or more sisters. 

1785 Feb 8 – An Heir Agreement was made between “French to French Jr.” as written in the left-hand border; Jacob French Senior and his two sons, George French and Jacob French Jr., should receive certain lands (220 acres). The Agreement also states that sons George and Jacob are to give their father Jacob 10 pounds yearly for the rest of his life. Upon Jacob’s death, the 2 brothers George and Jacob Jr. are to pay to their brothers John and Henry 100 Pounds. The Agreement also states that George and Jacob are to pay to each of their sisters or their heirs 50 pounds each. “Heirs Agreement” in 1788 indicated that this French family was well to do by the standards in those days.  He was fair because he could be, and not everyone could [74].

Note: This Agreement shows that Jacob French, the father, died about 17 Sep 1788 and this Agreement was proved on 22 Sep 1788, that Jacob had 4 sons listed probably in order of birth (George, Jacob Jr., John, Henry) and at least 2 or more sisters. This Heir Agreement does not mention any wives. It was signed and sealed in the presence of Robert Stephen, John Beshore, and Jacob Zurack.

This Heir Agreement was between Jacob French 2nd and his 4 sons George, Jacob 3rd, John, and Henry.

“This Agreement made this Eighth day of February 1785 between Jacob French 2nd and his two sons George French and Jacob French 3rd, witnessed that Jacob French 2nd hath bargained 2 lots and by these presents both . . . two sons George French and Jacob French 3rd all that tract of land where he lives [present tense] containing two hundred and twenty acres to have and to hold . . . In consignation? of the said land the said George and said Jacob French 3rd. . . . to Jacob French 2nd their father ten pounds yearly during his life besides room? and board and keeping one mare and at the death of the said Jacob French 2nd, the said George and Jacob French 3rd, are to pay to their brothers John French and Henry French each one hundred pounds dollars at 7/6 the said George and Jacob is also to pay to each their sisters or their heirs fifty pounds each dollar at 7/6 for the . . performance of this Agreement we have hereunto . . . own hands and seals the above date. Signed Sealed Acknowledged in the presence of Robert Stephen, John Beshore, Jacob Zurack. The money to be paid to their brothers and sisters as soon as they can make it without selling the Land and the Deeds to be made as soon as George and Jacob pay their father ten pounds. At a court . . . and held for Berkeley County the 22nd October 1788. This article of agreement was proved by the oath of Robert Stephen . . .”

* These two lots belonging to Jacob French 2nd totaled 220 acres is where Jacob French 2nd was living:

Š      “Long Point” surveyed for Jacob French on 13 Jun 1785, received on 30 Jun 1785 – 13 ¾ acres. This land was examined on 1 Jul 1785 by William Brown, a Specialty Appointee. See website on Washington County Circuit Court Land Survey, Subdivision, and Condominium Plats: http://plato.mdarchives.state.md.us/msa/stagser/s1500/s1529/cfm/dsp_unit.cfm?county=wa&qualifier=S&series=1231&unit=210

Š      “Keep Secret” surveyed on 15 Dec 1786 by Jacob French – 24 acres in Washington Co., Maryland.

1.1 Jacob French 1st, b. ca. 1702, m. Martha?, d. unk, Chart #195.

2.1 Louisa French, b. ca. 1722, m. John Schnebele ca. 1743, d. after 1792. Chart #30.

2.2 George French, b. before 1726, d. probably ca. 1772? when much of his land was sold, Chart #136. His children moved to TN.  

2.3 Jacob French 2nd, b. ca. 1727, m. Magdalena Schebley ca. 1751, d. 22 Oct 1788, Chart #208

3.1 Barbara French, b. ca. 1758?, m. Martin Helm, Chart #208.

3.2 Mary French, b. ca. 1760?, m. Reed, m2. Michael Miller – in father’s will, d. unk, Chart #208.

3.3 George French, b. ca. 1750?, m. Mary Saveley in 1789, d. 1830. He moved to North Carolina by 1782.

3.4 Jacob French 3rd, b. ca. 1750?, m. Catherine Pitzer, d. 6 Apr 1826, Chart #208.

3.5 John French, b. ca. 1750, m. Catherine Hedges, d. 1791, Chart #208.

3.6 Henry French, b. 1755, m. Elizabeth Earsom, d. 1821. He moved to Mercer County, KY, in 1773, FFA Chart #31.

3.7 Margaret French? who m. Henry Miller, Chart #208.

2.4 John French, b. ca. 1739, m. Maria Barbara, d. 1787, Chart #129.

This Heir Agreement was made between Jacob French 2nd showing that he was still alive in 1785. The Agreement is between Jacob French 1st’s son, Jacob French 2nd and his sons Jacob, George, Henry, and John. Jacob French 1st’s son George died in 1772 before this Heir Agreement was written. Jacob French 2nd was probably elderly and died by 22 Oct 1788 when this Heir Agreement was proved. At his death, the sons were able to sell his land. George, son of Jacob French 2nd, did not marry Mary Saveley until 1789 and they moved to NC. Son Jacob 3rd married Catherine Pitzer, and died in 1826. Their brother John married Catherine Hedges, and died in 1791. Their other brother Henry married Elizabeth Earsom, and died in 1821 in KY. The sisters were Barbara and Mary and perhaps Margaret.

Description: 2011 1 West Virginia 2 (05) (1)

From Vicki [32]. This is the Heirs Agreement we were allowed to photograph in the Courthouse in Martinsburg, WV. Good to look at it again....I noticed the Beshore name this time also. I did leave a message yesterday at the Frederick Historical Society Archives....no answer yet as to where those deeds are housed. I also sent an email on March 11, 2011 with an abstract from the same Archives....all I can find now are Page 2 of 2.  What I have in front of me is:

Creditors:  Thomas Reynolds, James Wilson
Next of Kin:  Jacob French, Benjamin French
Administrator:  Elizabeth French

Jacob French  10-3-1759-20-1759 [was this when Jacob French 1st died?]  

Appraisers:  John Dowell, Lewis Lewn
Creditors:  Henry Darnell, P Dannor, John Allein
Next of Kin:  Samuel Scott, Thomas Scott
Administrator:  John Scott

(It was explained to me by Nancy Lasure at the Courthouse in Martinsburg, WV, that one date is the appraisal date and the other is a settlement date.  Also was told that Next of Kin were not necessarily relatives.)  

This document seemed important in that the Scotts lived next door in Greencastle, and because Jacob French bought Huckleberry Hall in 1759.

1787 Apr 28 -- FRENCH, GEORGE to CALLAHAN, JOHN (AN).
Dates: 1787, Apr. 28.
Survey and title to “Harriet’s Fancy” and “Harriet’s Delight”.
MSA S999-2-111 MdHR 19990-02-11/03  Location: 1/7/3/17 (Maryland State Papers, confiscated British Property Paper). If George French, son of Jacob French 1st, died in 1772, this George would be a later one.

1787 Dec 12 – The Colony of Pennsylvania became a state.

Death of Jacob French 2nd and John French

1787 -- Vicki Ref. [32] located the following tax information from the Historical Society of Frederick County, MD:  The Personal Property Tax Lists for the year 1787 for Berkeley County, VA, List “A”, page 1404.

French, Jacob        self (charged with tax)   0 0 1 6 8 (Jacob French 2nd)
French Geo.           Jacob French (George was son of Jacob French 2nd)
French, J., Jr.        Jacob French (Jacob Jr. was son of Jacob French 2nd
French, Heny         Jacob French (Henry was son of Jacob French 2nd)

If John French was the son of Jacob French 2nd, he had died or did not pay taxes.

1787 Dec 25 -- John French, son of Jacob French 1st, died on 25 Dec 1787 in Hagerstown, Washington Co., MD. Thereafter in 1789, John French’s wife Maria Barbara Schmeiss French married William Albright in Washington County, MD, and owned land in Dover, Huntingdon County, PA, in 1793 – the deed was for land to be given to her son, Peter French.

This is the Will of John French in the name of God Amen in Maryland State Washington County in the ____ ______.  His Will is to give his wife Barbara all in her hands to take care of Everything till such time till the Youngest Child is of Eadg. and one his Wife Barbara the third share of Everything and the Rest is to be divided Among the Children. Each Child is to have a like share Except my Daughter Elizabeth is to have nothing but her oldest son is to get his share and my son Peter is to have one full share and one quarter of an share more than the rest if so ____ that one or tother of the Children shold not obea to his mother and not ____ fruitfully till such time he or she if Cumm of Eadg. is to have one Shilling Sterling for his or her share and no more.

John French (his mark)

Witnesses Present

George Rule

Abraham Long

On the back of the Original Will of the said John French are the following Endorsements to

    Washington County St  Dec 22, 1787 The Same Barbara French & made Oath that the within Instrument of Writing is the true and Whole Will & Testament of John French late of s’ by deces’ ____hath come to her hands or possession & that she doth not know of any Other.  And at the sametime same George Rule and Abraham Long the two subscribing Witnesses to the within Last Will of John French late of s’ by deces’ & severally made Oaths on the Holy Evangels of Almighty God that they did see the Testator herein named Sign & Seal this Will that they heard him publish pronounce & Declare the Same to be his Last Will that at the time of his so doing he was to the best of their comprehentions of sound & disposing mind____ & understanding & that they repectively Subscribed their names as Witnesses to this Will in the presence& at the request of the Testator & in the presence of each Other

Certified by  Thomas  Belt. (Regt ?)

1788 May 15 -- Jacob Schnebele wrote a will and gave to Christian and John, sons by his first wife, equal shares in his home farm. John received the part where his father lived, and was to take care of his stepmother Barbara. His other sons Henry, Jacob, Andrew, and Joseph from his second marriage received tracts located elsewhere in Antrim and Guilford townships. To make sure that his daughters received an equal portion of his estate, Schnebele actually sold his lands to his sons for specific sums named in his will, Ref. [66], page 86. After deducting the amount of their equal share, the sons were to make annual payments to the estate for distribution to their sisters, Ref. [66], page 87.

1788 Sep 17 -- Jacob French 2nd died on his farm in Hedgesville , WV. 

Document below is dated 17 Oct 1788 and the signatures are not of the French family as they marked their name with a letter.

Description: 2011 1 West Virginia 2 (07)

Research from Vicki, Ref. [32]. Some of the items mentioned in the appraisal are: a cabbage knife, a dough trough, a silver watch, a table and a chair, a large Bible, an old saddle, an old pair of boots, an old spinning wheel, a gun and powdered horn, a large chest, a quantity of old iron tools, a harrow, a black mare and colt, a mill for cleaning grain, a cutting box, a brand iron, and a spade.

Another list shows “Cash” to various people: Mathias Nicols, James Verder, for funeral expenses, Henry Claycomb, and cash to George French for 100 bl. of rye. 

The last entry is made January, 1794 in which three men sign off “We the subscribers have examined the above....and find proper vouchers for the same.” Robert Stephen, David Hunter, and James Wilson. They are from Rule Book 2, Berkeley County, VA.

1789 – John French, Colebrookdale, Berks County, PA, Tax and Exoneration. This proves that the John French who died in Maryland in 1787 is not the same John French of Colebrookdale. John was a farmer.

Description: Macintosh HD:Users:Mara:Desktop:Colebrookdale1.png
Description: Macintosh HD:Users:Mara:Desktop:Colebrookdale2.png

1790 Census -- George French’s name is listed in the 1790 census between that of Robert Peter and Thomas Slater. George French must have left Montgomery Co., MD, shortly after the 1790 census and after he signed as a witness on 24 Sep 1791 in Montgomery Co., Maryland.

Ref. [4] states that George French is in the 1790 census of Rockville, Montgomery Co., MD. There is a George Frinch (French) listed in Montgomery Co., MD with 4 free white males under 16, and 1 free white male over 16 who would have been George at age 41. Also listed are 6 free white females of all ages.

In the 1790 US Census of Montgomery Co., Maryland, George French is listed with 11 persons. Not listed here are 2 daughters who were born after 1790, and Aaron who was born after 1790.

4 free white males after 16, born after 1774, John, Jacob, James, George Jr.
1 free white male 16+, George French Sr.
6 free white females, wife, and 5 daughters

1790 Census of Pennsylvania – John Sneveley or Snively, the year before he died, two men are listed, one in Lampeter, Lancaster, PA, with 13 in the family (3 men over age 16 including head of household, 5 men under age 16, and 5 females total, name spelled Sneveley), and one in Cocalico, Lancaster, PA, with 6 in the family (2 men over age 16 including head of household, 1 man under age 16, and 3 females total, name spelled Sneveley). John would have been about age 70. In the census of Cocalico, also appearing is Jacob Eberley, a Sneveley relative, plus John Frank. This census does not give the age for Louisa French Sneveley; that is, if she was still living, but it states only the number of women in the household. Apparently John died in 1791 and Louisa died in 1792, but in Washington County, MD, not in Lancaster County, PA. These are the only 2 Sneveley families listed in the U.S. in 1790.

1790 Census of Bedford, PA – John French appears. Another John French appears in the 1790 Census of St. Mary’s, MD.

1791 Aug 25 -- Mercer County, Kentucky, Court Order Book 2, 25 Aug 1791, p 243, Walter Beall, assignee of John Reed v Stephen Fisher, on debt. There came a jury composed of John Arnold, John Little, Thomas Lillard, Edmund Munday, Solomon Corn, John Robertson, Henry French, John Goodnight, Stephen Hannah, Gideon Higgins, Joseph Mosby and Andrew Bunton, who found the defendant guilty as complained, and assessed the damages of 1 penny in addition to the debt and costs. Judgment to plaintiff for 24 pounds debt, plus the 1 penny damages, and costs.

1791 Aug 25 -- Mercer County, Kentucky, Court Order Book 2, 25 Aug 1791, p 244, Joseph Lawrence Stephens, Executor of George William Stevens decd v George Scott on debt. There came a jury composed of John Arnold, John Little, Thomas Lillard, Edmund Munday, Solomon Corn, John Robertson, Henry French, John Goodnight, Stephen Hannah, Gideon Higgins, Joseph Mosby and Andrew Bunton, who assessed damages for the plaintiff of 2 pounds, 16 shillings, 3 pence and costs. Plaintiff to recover against the defendant and Robert Scott, appearance bail, 13 pounds, 5 shillings, 4 pence, and costs.

Death of Louisa French Snively and John Snively

1792 Jan 21 -- John Snively, husband of Louisa French, died (his will was written Jan 4 1791 and proved Jan 21 1792), Washington Co MD; Louisa survived him as she is mentioned in his will, but apparently she died the next year; however, no document is available. Because John Snively was born in 1720, it is assumed Louisa was the first child of Jacob French 1st, born probably before 1725.

In the name of God, Amen, I John Snavely, of Washington County, State of Md, being at present weak in body but blessed be God sound in mind and memory, but calling to mind the Mortality of my body and knowing it is appointed for all men once to die, do make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following:

First and principally I commend my soul to Almighty God that gave it, hoping in the Resurrection of the Dead by Jesus Christ our Lord, and my body to the earth to be decently buried in a Christian like burial without pomp or vain parade at the Discretion of my executors here in after named and as touching such worldly estate wherewith it has pleased God to bless me with in this life, I give devise and dispose of the same in manner and for following:

Emprimus--it is my will that all just debts and funeral charges be fully paid and satisfied. I will also that all my personal Estate be sold at vendue or exposed of to the best advantage except what shall hereafter excepted otherwise bequeathed previous to which sale. I do order that my children mentioned as Legatees have is possible due notice of the day of sale in order that they may purchase such articles as may suit them to the value of their several legacies, and they account with the executors as so much paid to them. My Bible and Books not to be sold at venue but equally divided by lott among my several children. I will also that the following articles of my personal estate be not sold at vedue but disposed of in manner following:

viz. One good milk cow, a spinning wheel, a tea pot, feather bed and furniture, a pipe stove and a set of cutting tools be kept for the use of my wife on condition as is hereafter mentioned the two oldest horse creatures on my farm one plow and tackling, also whatever may be deemed to belong to grist mill or saw mill not to be sold or appraised but to be and remain for the use of said mills.

Item, I give and bequeath to my beloved wife Levina Snavely one good feather bed and furniture such as she may chose, spinning wheel and tea pot a womans saddle or the value thereof to be paid out of my estate before the dividend is made after my decease likewise one good milk cow a set of cutting tools and pipe stove. I will that all my children who at my decease not eighteen years of age* to work under the care and authority of my said wife and my son Jacob until they come to the age of eighteen. I will that my son John to be free at my decease and if any of my daughters who are not already settled with before my decease and paid of or part only paid that has worked at home after they came to the age of eighteen years for benefit of my estate before my decease shall be allowed two pounds for every year they may have so worked besides their clothing, except what time they have worked abroad, for their own use to be paid out of my estate.

Item I give and bequeath to my beloved son Michael Snavely and to his heirs and assigns forever the plantation a tract of land whereon he now lives with all and singular the premises and appliances thereto belonging or in any wise appertaining which land is bounded with the province line on the one side and his brother Jacob as it is now laid of by the county Surveyor a part of a tract of land called Tonoloway Lick and a part of tract called Well wisher and a part of a tract called Caledonia containing one hundred and thirty two acres and a quarter, and he my son Michael to pay my legatees herein after mentioned and named the sum of twenty pounds of good and lawful money of the state aforesaid within two years after my decease to be applied to the use and benefit of my legatees aforesaid in the same manner as my personal estate and he my son Michael to have no share therein.

Item: I give and bequeath unto my son Jacob Snavely the plantation whereon I now dwell with the grist mill and saw mill and all and every of the premises and appurtenances thereon or thereto belonging or in any wise appertaining to him and his heirs forever. Bounded by the aforesaid line in his brother Michael bequeathment each of said tracts and parcels of land are parts of Tonoloway Lick and a resurvey thereon well Wisher and part Caledonia as it is laid of by the County Surveyor. Containing two hundred and thirteen and a quarter of acres. My son Jacob Snavely to hold occupy possess and enjoy the before willed and bequeathed premises with appurtences and to be under the following constrictions and encumbrances and payments for the use and benefit of my other legatees which is to be applied for their use as my personal estate, he having no part therein: first he my son Jacob Snavely is to pay the full sum of five hundred pounds of good and lawful money of the state aforesaid in following payments viz. One year after my decease to pay the sum of fifteen pounds like money yearly and every year until such time as my youngest girl yet alive come to the age of eighteen years and the remainder to be paid in proportionally payments yearly and every year within the term of nine years after my youngest child then alive comes to the age of eighteen out of which payment I will to my beloved wife Lavina Snavely two childrens shares out of the proceeds of my personal estate.

Item: I will and bequeath the proceeds of my personal estate and the payments ordered by this my last will for my two sons to pay as aforesaid who are to be possessed of my real estate in manner following Viz: first to my beloved wife Levinia Snavely two childrens shares over and above what I have heretofore willed her and the other advantages which is hereafter intended for her the other part thereof to be divided equally amongst my children share and share alike Viz: Anna, Mary, Catherine, Christiana, Barbara, Magdelena, Levinia, Elizabeth and Hannah and my son John Snavely each and every of my said children share and share alike my son Michael and Jacob Snavely as they hold my real estate on condition before mentioned is not to share any of the payments they respectively make nor the proceeds of my personal estate.

Item: I will and order that my wife Levinia Snavely live in the homestead premises as before bequeathed to my son Jacob Snavely and have the profits of one half of all that is raised thereon and also the half profits of grist mill and saw mill with paying half costs of repairing said mills and the farm likewise that is if she continues my widow until my youngest child come to the age of eighteen years and at the time my youngest child comes to said or said wife is to surrender and yield up unto my son Jacob Snavely quiet and peaceable possession of said farm and mills and if in case she should marry she is to quit the said premises if my son Jacob require it and to have no profit thereof or thereupon and should she not marry after my youngest child comes of age but remains my widow and such surrender made as aforesaid then she is to have the full privilege of the new house now built over a cellar and my son Jacob Snavely is to keep for the use of his said mother Levinia Snavely one milk cow summer and winter on his own cost the increase to be his which cow is to be good and kept as one of his own and yearly and every year to furnish her with twelve bushels of good wheat five bushels of good (word omitted) one hundred weight of good pork thirty weight of good beef these articles to be given as she may stand in need of them especially the grain the profit and use of six apple trees where she chooses them yearly a quarter of an acre of good and sufficient ground for flax cleared with good and sufficient ground for a garden where she may choose. to haul or cause it to be hauled a sufficient quantity of firewood she paying for cutting as also a room or the cellar or spring house for her use the use of an oven to bake her bread in and when she stands in need to furnish a horse creature for her to perform any journey or journeys which she wishes to take all the above benefits to be done and continued unto her as long as she remains my widow.

Item: Should any of my children die without lawful issue then their proportionable part of share of my estate to be equally divided among all my children and if should happen that Jacob should die before he pays any part of the legatees money my son John is to take my son Jacob place if he will accept it and to perform what is to be performed and Jacob Snavelys heirs is to have a childs share out of my estate if so happens my son John Snavely doth not accept it then the mills and lands that I will to my son Jacob Snavely is to be sold to the best advantage.

Item: Provided always, that if it should happen that my wife could not live in peace with my son Jacob or receive any insult from or any under him or her pension paid not regular as aforesaid so that she has lawful reason to leave him then and in which cases she may depart and rent herself a dwelling where she likes best and most convenient for her and my son Jacob to pay the rent of the dwelling likewise to winter her cow and pay the grain, pork and beef as above mentioned and if he so neglects and lets her suffer then to pay unto her one pound for every such offense to be for her own use.

Item: I will likewise that after my son Jacob Snavely had full possession of aforesaid land and premises herein willed and bequeathed to him by me for the term of five years and does not make payment near to the contents of the will which is enjoined on him nor likely to make them soon so as to make satisfaction to my legatees, then it is my will that the land, mills, and premises herein bequeathed unto him be sold to the best advantage by my executors hereinafter named and my wife if remaining my widow as much out of the price of such land as to make her up two hundred and fifty pounds like money with the two shares that is already before willed unto her and my son Jacob Snavely on mome performance of the payment aforesaid to my Legatees as aforesaid is to pay fifteen pounds yearly and every year during his stay on said premises. After he has full possession of the same provision it is sold by my executors and the payments he has made there to be paid back to him out of the price of the said land and to be allowed one full share of my estate equal with the rest of my legatees. As I am in a low state of health and dont expect to live to repair the mill I will that my son Jacob shall have five pounds worth of provision and fifteen pounds in money or good that my answer to the purpose of money in discharging the repairs of said mill out of my estate and I do hereby constitute nominate and appoint my trusty friend John Thomas and my beloved sons Michael and Jacob Snavely the sole executors of this my last will and testament and I do hereby utterly disallow revoke and dismiss all and every former testament wills legacies bequests and executors by me in any wise before named willed and bequeathed ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament in witness thereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this twenty fourth day of January in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety one. signed John Snavely

Signed sealed published pronounced and delivered by the said John Snavely as his last will and testament in the presence of us John Flint Joseph Thralls Joseph Accoulemon.

Washington Co 1st on the 21st day of January 1792 came John Thomas Michael Snavely and Jacob Snavely and made oath that the within instrument of writing is the true and whole will and testament of John Snavely late of said county deceased that hath come to their hands or possession and that they do not know of any other. And at the same time came Joseph Thralls and John Flint two of the subscribing witnesses to the within last will and testament of John Snavely late of the said county deceased and severally made oath on the Holy Ebangels of Almighty God that they did see the testator herein named sign and seal this will that they heard him publish pronounce and declare the same to be his last will and testament and at the time of his so doing he was to the best of their apprehensions of sound and disposing mind memory and understanding & that they respectively subscribed their names as witnesses to this will in the presence and at the request of the testator and in the presence of each other and that they saw Joseph Accoulemon do the same. Certified by Thomas Belt, Regt Recorded 21 day of Jany 1792.

*He had children under age 18, or born after 1773. I would imagine that Louisa was born 1725 or later if she had children that young.

1792 -- Louisa (Levina) French Snively died after 1792 as she is mentioned in her husband’s will above.

1792 -- FRENCH, GEORGE to LATIMER, RANDOLPH B.
Dates: 1792, May. 10.
Application for purchase of "Rinds Ridge" in VA.
MSA S999-2-108 MdHR 19990-02-10/20  Location: 1/7/3/17 (Maryland State Papers, confiscated British Property Paper).

1794 -- James Davis’ son, John Davis, b. ca. 1742 in Frederick Co., VA, d. after 1799: Berkeley County, Virginia, Will Book 3, page 231, John Keesacker; Will 26 Mar 1794 prob 22 Apr 1799. Wife; Christiana Keesacker. Children; Matthias Keesacker, Andrew Keesacker, Aron Keesacker, Mary Keesacker, John Keesacker, George Keesacker. Exec; eldest son Andrew, Jacob French. Witnesses:  Charles Edelin, George Myles, John Davis. From Descendants of James and Sarah (VanMeter) Davis of Frederick Co., VA.

1796 --  Mercer County, Kentucky, Deed Book 2, Page 446, The deposition of Edward Davis taken this 8th day of February 1796 at the house now occupied by Isaac Coffman in Mercer County for the purpose of establishing the place whereon the improvement was made in the year 1774 that was claimed by Isaac Taylor deceased which deposition was taken by virtue of an order of the Court of Mercer County between the heirs of said Isaac Taylor deceased of the one party and James Speed, John Lillard and Henry French of the other part, the said James Speed, John Lillard and Henry French having acknowledged legal notice of the taking the deposition aforesaid, before us Thomas Freeman and Garrett Darland Commissioners appointed by the Court aforesaid for the purpose of taking the said deposition and the said Edward Davis having been duly sworn saith: That in February 1780 he was in company with Silas Harlan and they went by the place where Isaac Coffman now lives and the said Harlan showed this Deponent an Improvement which stood near the Spring now used by the said Isaac Coffman and told him it was an Improvement belonging to Isaac Taylor and that him the said Harlan had made it for the said Taylor. This deponent further saith that he was afterwards directed by the said Harlan to purchase the same improvement above said from the said Isaac Taylor and told this deponent that he expected the claim could begot cheap as the improvement had cost Taylor only 3 pounds which he had paid to him the said Harlan for the making of the improvement. This deponent further saith that he was a near neighbor to aforesaid Isaac Taylor and is well satisfied that he the said Taylor never was in this state either before or since the making of the improvement. Question by James Speed: when did you understand this aforesaid sum of 3 pounds was paid by Isaac Taylor to Harlan? Answer: I understand (but cannot tell by whom) that the money was not paid by Harlan until after the battle at the Point [Pleasant], which was the fall of 1774, and further the deponent saith not.

1798 -- Indenture by George French, his wife, and others in 1798, where the 220 acres is described “being the whole of the plantation in the possession of the said Jacob French dec'd and on which he lived at the time of his death and purchased by him in his life time of a certain Edward Davis and James Davis...." (This George French was the brother of Jacob French 3rd. Furthermore, Edward Davis is the one who moved to Mercer Co., KY with Henry French, son of Jacob French 2nd; the DNA of both George and Henry French’s families match.)

1798 Jun 29 -- Jacob French 2nd, who died in 1788, had his land split up among his children. But in 1791 when his son John died, John’s share needed to be split up. John was the executor of his father’s will. Land was further divided among the following family members:

George French, son, and his wife Mary Saveley
Barbara French Helm, daughter, who married Martin Helm
Mary French, daughter, who married Michael Miller
Margaret French, daughter, who married Henry Miller
Henry French, son, had moved out of the area.

All of Berkeley County, WV, sold to their sibling Jacob French 3rd two tracts of land adjoining each other: 220 acres, land which Jacob French 2nd, now deceased, had purchased from Edward Davis and James Davis. Jacob French 2nd also purchased the following 2 tracts of land; the house is located on the 220 acres from Jacob French 1st heirs.

1. 16 Apr 1803 Adam Gilliland and Sarah, his wife, of Shelby Co., KY, James Davis and Ruth, his wife, George Groves and Drusilla, his wife, Alexander Cochron and Mary, his wife, John Davis, Jacob Davis, and Anna Davis heirs of John Davis, dec. and Ellizabeth Davis, widow of Berkeley Co., WV, sold for $1,898.00 to Jacob French 2nd 94 acres 1 rodd 18 poles land on the west side of Tullis Branch where John Davis died, along George Newkirk, John Turner, and Jacob French.

2. 11 Nov 1807 Jacob Davis and Elizabeth, his wife of Washington Co., Kentucky sold for $370.00 to Jacob French of Berkeley County 3 acres granted to Jaccob Davis by patent 18 May 1805. Line ran along the corner of James Davis to John Davis. 340-acre patent to the heirs of the late John Ellis, dec.

1799 -- Berkeley County, Virginia, Will Book 3, page 231, John Keesacker; Will 26 Mar 1794 prob 22 Apr 1799. Wife; Christiana Keesacker. Children; Matthias Keesacker, Andrew Keesacker, Aron Keesacker, Mary Keesacker, John Keesacker, George Keesacker. Exec; eldest son Andrew, Jacob French. Witnesses:  Charles Edelin, George Myles, John Davis.

1800 -- Berkeley County [West] Virginia Tax List A, Adam and Jacob French Sr. and Jr., 1800

The 1800 Berkeley Co, (W) VA Tax List A lists:
Commissioner James Wilson;
Adam French; p 1403 with one cow
Jacob French; p 1404 1 slave under sixteen, oo6 horses and 8 cows.
Geo. J[acob]., Jr. shows Jacob charged with tax
Henr.
Jacob French, Jr; p 1404

1800 -- Berkeley County Tax List B Thomas Hart Commissioner

The 1800 Berkeley Co, (W) VA Tax List B lists:
Commissioner Thomas Hart;
William French two horses and 5 cows, pg 1424.
p. 1440 The commissioner was required to note the day he visited each taxpayer. This makes it possible to rearrange the lists and determine probable neighbors. List A 3/30 Adam French 

5/24 
George French
Henry French
J. Jr.
Jacob.

5/28
William French

[Note: Adam French is in the 1820 census of Lurgan, Franklin Co., PA, with a family of 6].

1800 -- Tax List of George and Jacob French, 1800

John Frederick Dorman, Editor The Virginia Genealogist, Volume 8, 1964. (Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, Inc., 1993) Berkeley County, (West) Virginia 1800 Tax List William Slaughter, Junr. 

George French. [Back Creek] 1 adult male and 4 horses

Jacob French [Stephens Neck] 2 males 6 horses

1800 -- George P. French (b. 1749, son of George French) moved to Greenville, SC, before 1800 as he is there in the 1800 census records, but we cannot find him in 1790 as he does not appear to be the George French listed in 1790 in Montgomery Co., MD.

2 males under 10
2 males 10-15
1 male over 45, born before 1755, George P. French
2 females under 10
1 female 26-44

1806 Aug 16 Barbara French married Michael Lephart, suretor was Jacob French, in Berkeley County, VA. Barbary French was the daughter of Jacob French 3rd.

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1808 -- Mercer County, Kentucky, Deed Book 6, page 519, 8 Mar 1808 Henry French (son of Jacob French 2nd) and his wife Elizabeth of Mercer County, Kentucky, sold 410 acres to Edward Davis, for 164 pounds on the Dry Fork, corner to Jeremiah Briscoe.

1810 Berkeley Co, VA (now WV) Federal Census, George French was living with his wife and 8 children:

Males 10-15                   2 – sons born 1794-1800 – Jacob and Henry
Males 16-25                   1 – sons born 1786-1794 -- John
Males over 45                1 – George, therefore born before 1765, b. ca. 1750
Females less than 10       4 – dau. born 1800-1810 – Barbara, Margaret, Mary, and Christina
Females 16-26               1 – dau. born 1786-1794 -- Catherine
Females 26-45               1 – Mary born after 1765, b. 1769

1814 -- John French resided in Antrim, Franklin County, PA, in 1814.

Description: Macintosh HD:Users:Mara:Desktop:Franklin.png

1814 -- Samuel French resided in Antrim, Franklin County, PA, in 1814, and was a farmer.

Description: Macintosh HD:Users:Mara:Desktop:Samuel.png

1819 Aug 20 -- Survey Book ??, page 355: Berkeley County. By Virtue of a Land Office Treasury Warrant No. 6664 issued 8 Jan 1819. Tract of waste and ungranted land situated on Back Creek in the said county of Berkeley, bounded as follows: Beginning at a white oak on the east bank of said Creek, thence crossing the Creek S 64 1/2 W 6 poles to an ash on the west side of said creek, a corner to the said Robert Snodgrass' land, thence with his line along the bank of said Creek as follows S 19 1/2 E 74 poles, thence S 67 E 48 poles, thence S 49 E 26 poles, thence S 84 E 44 poles, thence S 53 1/2 E 28 poles, thence S 30 E 40 poles, thence S 85 E 18 poles, thence S 36 E 20 poles, thence S 21 1/2 E 18 poles, thence S 13 E 20 poles, thence S 12 1/2 W 40 poles, thence S 58 W 61 poles to a gum & hickory on the bank of said creek, corner to the said Snodgrass, thence crossing the Creek, E 25 poles to a pine on the high bank of said Creek (a corner to another tract belonging to the said Snodgrass, also a corner to Jacob French, or Jordans' heirs land, thence with his or their line N 48 E 126 poles to a stake at the place of two fallen pines corner to the same and Jacob Snyder's land, thence N 12 W 77 poles to a Spanish oak on the west side of a steep pinny hill, corner to the same, thence N 57 W 36 poles to an ash and locust, corner to the said Snyder, and William Runnor's land, thence S 56 W 65 poles to a stake corner to the same on the bank of said Back Creek thence down the creek with the meanders of the same, and with his lines as follows, N 3 W 40 poles, thence N 53 1/2 W 28 poles, thence N 84 W 42 poles, thence N 49 W 26 poles, thence N 67 W 42 poles, thence N 19 1/2 W 73 poles to the Beginning Containing 50 acres (horizontal measure). Surveyed 20 August 1819, examined & recorded. James Maxwell. chain carriers: David Eurtez? & Henry ___ish; pilot: Robert Snodgrass Ju'r.

1820 census of Middletown, Berkeley Co., VA, George French was living with his wife and 7 children:

1 free white male under 10 (son born 1810-1820) – unk son
2 free white males 16-25 (son born 1795-1804) – Jacob and Henry
1 free white male 26-44 (son born 1776-1795) -- John
1 free white male 45 and over (George, born before 1776, b. 1750)
2 free white females 10-15 (dau. born 1805-1810)
2 free white females 16-25 (dau. born 1795-1804)
1 free white female 45 and over (Molly Saveley French, born before 1775)

1826 Apr 6 -- Jacob French 3rd, grandson of Jacob French 1st, dies. He wrote a will dated 4 May 1824, proved 8 May 1826, as Jacob French of Berkeley Co., VA, filed in Frederick Co., Index Number 1828-027-SC, plaintiff was John French, defendant was the widow of Jacob French (Catherine Pitzer), also mentioned are surnames Colston, French, Harrison, Howke (Houck), Jordan, and Lepard. See http://www.lva.virginia.gov/chancery/case_detail.asp?CFN=069-1828-042. Jacob’s widow was Catherine Pitzer French, b. 30 Jan 1759, and d. 25 Aug 1850 in Little River, Montgomery Co., VA.

Vicki, Ref. [32] informed the FFA about the book "Architectrual and Pictorial History of Berkeley County, Vol. VI" by Don C Wood and highly referenced. Pages were faxed to Vicki by Max Oates in 2010. 

Court Cases 215 through 219, French vs. French and others, Berkeley County Chancery. Jacob French 3rd died April 6, 1826 leaving a will. Copy included in Court case. Jacob French left 62 acres to son Henry French. Land adjoining land Henry French owned. To daughter Mary $1000, to daughter Barbary $900, to daughter Rachel $900, to daughter Elizabeth $500 to be paid 10 years after my death if she is deceased to be paid to her children when they arrive at the age of 21 years, to daughter Hannah $900 all to be made in four payments, to my wife all household and kitchen furniture, beds and bedding and such cattle as she may choose to keep and at any time she may want a horse creature she is to be furnished with one, to my son John French all the land I now live on - and all the money Bond notes and accounts and all the Blacks that is now on hand. John to be Executor. Will dated 4 May 1824, proved 8 May 1826. 

In 1826 Catherine Pitzer, the widow of Jacob, refused to accept the provision made for her by Jacob French's will and asked the Court to lay off a dower land for her. There's more.....all of it is cited with Berkeley County Deed Book and Frederick Co VA Will Book citations.

The FFA would assume that all 5 living daughters were mentioned (Barbary, Hannah, Ellizabeath, Mary, Rachel), plus two sons Henry and John. Four married daughters and one single daughter are mentioned. Their surnames in 1824 were: Colston, French, Harrison, Houck, Jordan, Lepard, all of whom lived in Frederick Co., VA, in the 1830 census after Jacob’s death.

1. Henry French, b. 1785?, m. Molly/Mary Lefevre, d. Oct 1840. Mary Lefevre was still living in the 1880 census in Oxford, Butler Co., OH, born in 1785 in Maryland, age 95, widowed, listed as “mother” of the head of household who was Sarah L. Colston, and living with the 3 Colston children.
2. Barbary Lepard, b. 1785?, m, Michael Lepard on 16 Aug 1806 in VA, d. 14 Feb 1842.
3. Rachel Houck, b. 17 Sep 1788 in VA, m. Henry Houck on 23 Apr 1812.
4. Hannah Jordan, b. 14 Dec 1793 in VA, m1. William Jordan on 22 Jan 1813, m2. Pitzer, d. 1873.
5. Elizabeth Harrison, 1796, m. George D. Harrison.
6. John A. French, b. 22 Sep 1796 in VA, m. Sarah Myers, d. 8 Sep 1837 in VA. After John died and in the 1860 census, Sarah French had 7 slaves.
7. Mary French, b. 17 Jun 1798, married after 1824, m1. Robert Proctor, m2. Boxter, d. 1881.

1830 -- The old French House is a stone farmhouse built ca. 1830 at 789 French Road in Jefferson Co., WV 25442. Today this is considered Shepherdstown, the oldest town in the state of West Virginia.

1830 census of Berkeley, VA, listed as George French, perhaps living with:
      2 males, 10-14, b. 1816-1820, children
      1 male 15-19, b. 1811-1815, children
      1 male 80-89, b. 1741-1750,
George, b. 1750
      1 female 15-19, b. 1811-1815, children
      4 females 20-29, b. 1801-1810, children
      1 female 60-69, b. 1761-1770,
Molly Saveley French, b. 1769, m. 1789