French Family Association 

The Official Website of the Surname French

Oldtown, Allegany County, Maryland, in 1755,
before George French arrived in 1790

Chart #166a (and #107)
James, Thomas, and George French, ca. 1730
Baltimore and Montgomery Counties, Maryland
Oldtown, Shipton, and Town Creek, Allegany Co., Maryland

and

Chart #166b, William French of Baltimore, Maryland

This chart updated by Mara French on 2/18/13. Numbers in brackets [ ] show sources and refer to the bibliography at the end of this chart. An asterisk (*) shows continuation of that line. Send any corrections or additions to this chart to marafrench@mindspring.com. Revisions: 2012, 2013.

Contents

FFA Home Page

Foreword

Ancestral Overview

Lineage

First Generation of James, Thomas, and George French

Second Generation

Third Generation

Fourth Generation

Fifth Generation

Sixth Generation

Seventh Generation

DNA Testing

Chart #166b, William French of Baltimore

Bibliography

Foreword

I’ve researched this line just about all I can from ancestry.com and from the internet. Additions need to come from family members or from local books or historians who haven’t put their information online.

P.S. Although James, Thomas, and George French are not of my line, I will continue to do research on them as time permits. My line is FFA Chart #6.

Maryland County History Timeline

See: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~harrisonrep/Census/Mdco.html.

Baltimore County was formed in 1659 from Anne Arundel and Kent Counties.
Frederick County was formed in 1748 from Prince George’s County.
Montgomery County was formed from Frederick County in 1776.
Washington County was formed from Frederick County in 1776.
Allegany County was formed from Washington County in 1789.

Description: Macintosh HD:Users:Mara:Desktop:maryland-county-map.gif

Ancestral Overview

If anyone finds more data on this line, please email marafrench@mindspring.com.

Brothers James, Thomas, and George French were born basically ca. 1730. James died in 1760. Thomas lived in Baltimore County and died in 1782; however, his brother George moved to Allegany County and lived until over 94 years old, ca. 1834. George is listed in the 1830 census of Allegany Co., Maryland and he was buried on 7 Dec 1834 at the Oak Hill Cemetery in Washington, WDC.

One difficulty with deciphering this family is that Thomas’ son George was born ca. 1755 and died in 1803 (only ca. 48 years old) and had 6 children, whereas his uncle George died in 1834 living to be 94 years old and having only 2 daughters; therefore, there is much confusion with these two generations of George French as they overlap for the most part when they both owned land in Maryland.

To make things even more complicated, James married Ariana Bankson (from Sweden), and George French, son of Thomas, married Ariana Scott; therefore, two women are named Ariana French, quite an unusual name. These names overlap and it is difficult to tell which is which, in fact, presently we believe both of them died in 1811, but we are unsure how to distinguish them apart from one another.

Could George French have been the father of James, Thomas, and George?

“A” George French immigrated to Annapolis, Maryland, in 1733 as a convict from Kent, England. The Passenger and Immigration Lists Index on ancestry.com shows a Catherine and George French in 1733 who were passengers in bondage from London to Annapolis, Maryland as per Peter W. Coldham’s “Emigrants in Bondage”. We have no further information. He may have been born ca. 1705 if Catherine were his wife. He may also have stayed in Maryland or gone elsewhere – we do not know.  

According to the Historical Court Records of Washington, D.C., Death Records, “a” George French Sr. d. 1765 in WDC. Could this George French have been the father of James, Thomas, and George? We have always wondered how George could have bought land in 1747 if he were not yet 21, so supposedly, this could have been his father.

Could Edmund French have been the father of James, Thomas, and George?

The father of the first generation could have been Edmund who owned land he called “French’s Bedford” in Baltimore consisting of 200 acres on 10 Nov 1707.

George and Thomas French were brothers, and Thomas also had a brother named George. The George French listed below is most likely from FFA Chart #195, or perhaps it is a list of several men named George French – we do not know. FFA Chart #195 also includes names Jacob French and Peter French; however, the land entries of George from Baltimore are from FFA Chart #166, except we do not know how Michael fits in. Ariana French was the widow of James French of FFA Chart #166. The Thomas French Esq. listed below is from FFA Chart #166, this chart. The other men listed are probably from other French families.

Description: Maryland3

Description: Maryland4

Description: Maryland1

Description: Maryland2

Lineage

0.1 Edmund French, owned land in Baltimore in 1707

0.2 Michael French, owned land in Baltimore in 1730

 

1.1 James French, b. ca. 1726 in Baltimore, m. Ariana Bankson who was b. 1733, he d. 1761, no issue. We are unable to determine Ariana's death date from the death date of Ariana, 2.2. 

 

1.2 Thomas French, b. ca. 1727, m. Catherine Ward in 1750, d. 1782.

     2.1 Catherine French, b. ca. 1751.

     2.2 George French, b. ca. 1755, m. Ariana Scott, d. 1811, George d. 1803.

           3.1 Elizabeth French, b. 1775, d. 1839, m. John Weems who d. before 1811

           3.2 Thomas French, b. ca. 1776, d. late in 1810, no issue.

           3.3 Catherine French, b. 1778, d. before 1811.

           3.4 George French, b. 1781, m. Margaret Weems 1807, d. 1828.

                  4.1 Margaret Hall Weems French, b. 1809, m. Robert Bowie, d. 1847. 

           3.5 Charles French, b. ca. 1785, d. between 1805-1811, m. Marianna Craik Clark.

           3.6 Robert C. French, b. 1792, m1. Gautier, m2. Helen Dickson in 1824

                  4.1 Susan B. French, b. 1812, d. 1896, did not marry.

                  4.2 Phoebe French, b. 1814, m. Jonathan Glass

                  4.3 Robert Summerfield French, b. 1829 in NYC, m. Sarah Hobb Evans in 1851, d. 1883?

                        5.1 Harris H. French, b. 1853, m1. unk who d. before 1882, m2. Adelaid R. in 1882, d. 1903. 

                              6.1 Harris F. French, b. 1883, d. 1928

                              6.2 Robert S. French, b. 1885

                                     7.1 Stewart T. French, b. 1908, m. Laura A. Richards in 1927

                              6.3 Stuart G. French, b. 1887, d. 1906

                        5.2 Evan French, d. at 3 years old.

                        5.3 Helen Gautier French, b. 1856, d. before 1870.

                        5.4 Gautier French, d. at 3 years old.

                        5.5 Chauncey Edwin French, b. 1859, d. 1943.

                        5.6 Elsie Gautier French, b. 1865, m. William Lowe Rice, d. 1938.

                  4.4 Thomas Gautier French, b. 1830, d. 1875, m. Annette Tingley Shepard in 1852. 

                        5.1 Helen E. French, b. 1853

                        5.2 Chauncey S. French, b. 1855

                        5.3 Annie G. French, b. 1858. 

                  4.5 Malinda French, b. 1832, m. George Shryock, d. 1910.

                  4.6 George French, b. 1838, d. 2 May 1843.

                  4.7 Elizabeth Gautier French, b. 1834.

                  4.8 Samuel Gautier French, b. 1835.

             

1.3 George French, b. 1740, m1. Elizabeth Haynes ca. 1762, m2. Jane Crabtree 19 Jan 1713. Jane was ca. 45 years younger than George. Only 2 daughters in his will dated 29 Sep 1828. He was buried on 7 Dec 1834 at the Oak Hill Cemetery in Washington, WDC.

     2.1 Laney French, b. 1777.

     2.2 Phoebe French, b. 1814, d. 1894, m. Lewis Shryock.

 

 

Unknown Family of Baltimore, MD

1.x William French, m. Annie Gibson

     2.1 Captain William French, m. Lucy Ann Cully

          3.1 Capt. Robert Armistead French, b. 1821, m. Mary Woods, had 11 children.

                4.1 Laura V. French, b. 1848, d. before 1915

                4.2 Mary French, b. 1849, d. before 1915

                4.3 Alice B. French, b. 1853, m. Poole, d. 1914.

                4.4 Mamie French, b. 1854, d. before 1915

                4.5 Isabelle French, b. 1856, m. Troxell, d. after 1930.

                4.6 Robert Ellsworth French, b. 1858, m. Annie. 

                4.7 Charles French, b. 1861, d. before 1915.

                4.8 George J. French, b. 1865, d. after 1915.

                4.9 Chester Lee French, b. 1867, m. Chrissie, d. 1915.

                4.10 Aronstead William French, b. 1871, d. before 1915, moved to CA.

                4.11 Edna P. French, b. 1878, m. Bopst, d. after 1915.

          3.2 John B. French, b. 1822, d. 1858.

First Generation of James, Thomas, and George French

1.1  James French, b. 1726 most likely in England (see comments on this brother Thomas), d. 10 Mar 1760 in Baltimore, MD. He left no issue.

Marriage

James m. after 1754 to Ariana Bankson. Ariana was b. 2 Jun 1733 in Baltimore, MD and d. 28 Apr 1805. At James’ death in 1760, Ariana became his widow and executrix. Ariana did not remarry but remained a widow and seamstress the rest of her life and lived in a house on Lexington St. in Baltimore until she died in 1805. She became rather noteworthy in her legal aptitude for land deeds and in being an executrix of several French descendants of her husband.

Chronology

1726 – James born.

1733 Jun 2Ariana born.

1753 -- Ariana’s mother, Hannah Hughes, deeded Ariana on 9 Mar 1753 one negro woman called Nell and a negro child called Flora for a year.

1754 – James and Ariana married. No heirs that we know of; however, her death notice indicates she had children (see “Death” below).

1760 – James died 10 Mar 1760.

1766 -- Ariana received 3 acres of land in Baltimore called “Ariana’s Habitation” after her husband died in 1760.

1770 – Hannah Hughes’ will [mother of Ariana] was proved 4 Dec 1770 in Baltimore.

1796 -- A 1796 directory shows that Ariana was living alone in Baltimore, a widow, and a seamstress, on the south side of Lexington Street.

1800 Ariana appears in the 1800 census of Montgomery Co., MD.

1805 – 28 Apr 1805 Ariana died in Baltimore.

Census Records

1800 -- Ariana appears in the 1800 census of Montgomery County, Maryland, living alone, listed as head of household with 10 slaves. When she died, the 10 slaves were inherited by Thomas French, the son of her brother-in-law Thomas, as witnessed in the 1810 census where Thomas was living alone with 10 slaves (unless this was a coincidence). Ariana died in 1805 and Thomas died in 1811, both with no issue. See the 1810-1811 epidemic of smallpox in Baltimore. Thomas was the son of Ariana’s brother-in-law, George French.

1800 -- Ariana French is “also” listed in the 1800 census of Georgetown, Washington D.C. living with:

2 white males ages 10-15, b. 1785-1790, Robert and Charles
2 white males ages 16-26, b. 1774-1784, George and Thomas
1 white female age 10-15, b. 1785-1790, Catherine
1 white female age 26-44, b. 1756 or after, Ariana Scott French
and 13 slaves, a total of 19.

She was living next door to John Weems, husband of Elizabeth French, her daughter.

This second Ariana French is Ariana Scott French, the wife of George French, 2.2, in the Second Generation. Most likely she was named after her aunt, Ariana Bankson French, of the First Generation, 1.1. This proves that the French and Scott families knew each other ca. 1755 and that they probably lived nearby one another.

Ariana French, Executrix of Thomas French

Ariana French was the executrix of the will of her brother-in-law Thomas French vs. the State of Maryland and James Clarke who was in a contract dated 26 Feb 1777 for £1900 with Thomas French of Baltimore. Thomas received the money and James Clarke received the property. Shortly afterwards, Thomas moved to Jamaica, where he probably died in 1782.

A 1796 directory shows that Ariana was living alone in Baltimore, a widow, and a seamstress, plus she appears in the 1800 census living alone.

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Ariana French’s Death

Ariana could have been born shortly after her father had died, as the following notice may be her death notice from the Baltimore American indicating that she was b. 2 Jun 1733 in Baltimore, MD:

“Departed this life the 28th of April 1805, Mrs. Uryith French, aged 71 years, 10 months and 26 days, after a lingering illness which she bore with christian fortitude. In the death of this lady her friends and relations have to lament the loss of an affectionate mother, a kind neighbor and a good christian.” [Source: "Memoirs of the Dead," Unknown (Baltimore, 1806; reprint, Westminister, MD: Family Line Publications, 1989), page 194] and by The Rambo Family Tree, 2 Ed., Jul 2007, “Descendants of Peter Gunnarson Rambo”, 3rd Vol.: “Descendants of His Daughter, Gertrude Rambo Bankson".

Knowing that this Ariana French of the First Generation was born in 1733 makes it clear that she was not the Ariana who married George French in the Second Generation, born ca. 1755. Furthermore, it tells us that this Ariana was the one who owned “Ariana’s Habitation” in 1766 because she needed to be at least 21 years old. However, it mentions that Ariana was “an affectionate mother”, but we do not know of any children she had, but she did have nieces and nephews. The spelling Uryith was definitely Ariana because the names Rambo and Bankson are part of her ancestry.

However, Ariana’s father died on 14 Jun 1732 which would have made it impossible for Ariana to have been born on 2 Jun 1733.

James French’s Death

The will of James French was dated 28 Jan 1760, proved 10 Mar 1760, recorded in Baltimore Wills 2: p. 281, and transcribed as follows, and no children are mentioned:

“In the Name of God Amen. I, James French of Baltimore Town being weak of Body yet of Sound and Perfect memory (Thanks be to God) do make and publish this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following that is to say, Imprimis. I Humbly Commend my Soul to Almighty God hoping His Gracious acceptance of the same thro the Infinite Mercies and compassion of my Redeemer Jesus Christ, and my body to the Earth to be decently Interred agreeable to the Discretion of my Executrix hereinafter mentioned. ITEM I Give and Bequeath unto my dear wife Areaunah French all my Estate both Reall and Personall and appoint her my whole and sole Executrix of this my last Will and Testament, hereby Revoking all other and former Will or Wills made by me. In Witness whereof I have to this my Last Will, Sett my hand and Seale this Twenty Eight Day of January, in the Year of Our Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred and Sixty. James French.

Signed, Sealed, Published and declared as the Last Will and Testament of the said James French, in presence of us. Wm. Askew, J. Bonfield, Jno. Stansbury, Jnr.

Ariana’s Land Deeds

Ariana or Areanah had land in 1761 and in 1766 in Baltimore. She was the widow of James French who died in Baltimore County leaving a will, 28 Jan 1760, proven 10 March 1760, named his wife Areaunagg as extx.; admin. bond was posted 11 Mar 1760 by Arianna French with Hannah Hughes [her mother] and Daniel Chamier [slave]; est. (estate) admin. 24 Feb 1761; dec. left no issue (4:349; 13:103; 210-30:835).

Ariana acquired 3 ½ acres of landed called “Ariana’s Habitation” on 8 Oct 1766, see http://www.msa.md.gov/megafile/msa/stagser/s1100/s1190/000400/000473/tif/dsl00473-1.jpg. Also see Ref. [27] in the Bibliography. She is mentioned various times throughout this family as she inherited thousands of acres of land.

1799 -- 1799/11/08
451A: Walter Brookes vs. William King, William Bayly, and Ariana French. MO. Injunction against execution of judgment.
Accession No.: 17,898-451A MSA S512-1- 503 Location: 1/35/5/ [31]

1799 -- 1799/10/30
645: William Bayly and Ariana French vs. William King and John Skinner. MO. Title to lots in Georgetown. Recorded (Chancery Record) 63, p. 691.
Accession No.: 17,898-645 MSA S512-1- 674 Location: 1/35/5/ [31].

 

Bankson was a Swedish Family

Ariana or Areaunah was of Swedish descent, the daughter of Joseph Bankson or Bankston or Bengtsson who was b. 2 May 1696 in Moyamensing, Philadelphia Co., PA and d. 14 Jun 1732 in Baltimore. Her mother was Hannah Halle, b. 1698, d. 1769 and was buried at Old Saint Paul’s Cemetery in Baltimore. Joseph Bankson had at least 4 children: Rebecca, Susanna/Hannah, Joseph, and Ariana was the last child born before 1733 in Baltimore as her father had died in 1732.

Joseph Bankson was the son of Andrew Anders Bengtsson, b. 1640 in Göteborg, Fäxarn (today Fuxema parish), Sweden, d. 14 Sep 1705 after drowning in the Delaware River or Hollanders Creek in Philadelphia, PA [27]. The Moyamensing tract in Philadelphia Co., PA, was granted by the Dutch West India Company Lieutenant Alexander d'Hinoyossa, Vice-Director of New Amstel to Martin Clensmith, William Stille and Lawrence Andries. In 1684, when the land was turned over from the Dutch to the English, the title was given by William Penn to William Stille, Lassey Andrews, Andrew Bankson and John Matson.

In Moyamensing, they attended the Swedish Log Church at Wicaco located below Society Hill, built in 1669, and used until about 1700. Joseph died before 14 Jun 1732 at the age of 36, shortly after they had moved to Baltimore. Hannah then m. William Hughes on 11 Dec 1735, after Ariana’s birth, at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Baltimore and they administered the Bankson estate. William Hughes, tavern keeper, d. by 3 Jan 1746/7 when his will was proved in Baltimore.

Ariana’s mother, Hannah Hughes, deeded Ariana on 9 Mar 1753 one negro woman called Nell and a negro child called Flora for a year. Ariana is listed as a widow and seamstress living on the south side of Lexington Street in the 1796 Baltimore city directory. This source proves that she did not remarry and did not have heirs. It was originally thought that she could have married her husband’s brother, George, but no source verifies this.

Hannah Hughes wrote her will dated 14 Feb 1769 and it was proved 4 Dec 1770 in Baltimore, in which she gave land, money, and belongings to her daughters Rebecca Carter and Susanna Norwood. She also gives to Ariana French and makes her executrix:   

to my daughter Arianah French my two young negroes named Sharlotter* and Daniel** with all the rest and residue of my estate both real and personal or of what kind or nature soever, to her and her heir’s forever And Lastly I do hereby nominate Constitute and appoint my loving daughter, Arrinah French my whole and sole Executrix of this my Last Will and Testament hereby revoking and making void all former or other will or wills heretofore by me made [30].”

*Sharlotter Boles is listed in the 1810 census of Middle River Lower Hundred, Baltimore, MD, living alone.

**Daniel Chamier was the step-father of John Carnan.

Hannah Hughes (Ariana’s mother) and Daniel Chamier (slave), also mentioned above, have other sources indicating they were in Maryland in 1761. The other men listed below, Jacob, Michael the Elder, and Michael the Younger, might have been relatives, but no further research has been done on them. Michael French the Younger was b. ca. 1733. On 18 Oct 1753 he became a runaway servant in Baltimore of John Hall and Jacob Giles for steeling clothes.

Description: Maryland

29 March 1735, NATHANIEL & RHODEA AYRES, carpenter, of Baltimore County, Maryland to Rowland Vine, planter, of same, 5 pounds and 800 pounds of tobacco, 100 acres…west side of Winters Run.  Signed: NATHANIEL AYRES. Witnesses: Hannah (X) Bankson and William Hammond. This tract of land was known as “Brown’s Lot.” [Barnes, Deed 1659-1750] Note that the date 1735 was after Hannah Bankson’s husband died and after Ariana was born.

Joseph and Hannah Bankson had 4 children. Perhaps Ariana is named after Hannah’s side of the family [30]. All children were born before 1733 when their father Joseph Bankson Sr. died.

Joseph Bankson Jr., b. 1718 in Frederick Co., MD, d. 12 Jan 1762 in Baltimore Co., MD, buried at Old Saint Paul’s Episcopal Cemetery. Predeceased his mother. He m. Elizabeth Giles Slemaker on 16 Jan 1752.

Rebecca Bankson, b. before 1733, m. Richard Carter ca. 1749 as they had their first child in 1750. Richard was b. 17 Oct 1718 in Maryland.

Ariana Bankson, b. before 1733, m. James French after 1752.

Susanna (Hannah) Bankson, b. before 1733, m. Samuel Norwood, he was b. 1725 in Maryland, d. 1773 in Baltimore. They had one child, Ruth Norwood, b. 24 Feb 1754, m. Charles Ridgely.

Old St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Charles Street at Saratoga, Baltimore, Maryland, www.osp1692.org. Email: office@osp1692.org.

 

1.2* Thomas French, b. ca. 1727 perhaps in Frenchgrove, Co. Mayo, Ireland, but then he definitely lived in London, England, as indicated in his Bible Records, see below. He immigrated first to NYC, most likely Port Richmond, Staten Island, Richmond Co., NY, and then to Washington, D.C. Since he was British, he did not need to be naturalized. He then removed to Maryland, principally Georgetown (now WDC), which was in Baltimore County, Maryland, his main hometown, d. ca. 1782 perhaps in Jamaica and his large land estate was settled in Jun 1788.

Sheriff

Thomas was Sheriff of Frederick County, Maryland, in 1775. He is also referred to as Thomas French, “Esq. of Annapolis”, according to Deb, Ref. [18]. See http://frederickcountymd.gov/index.aspx?NID=766. From the “Proceedings of the Conventions of the Providence of Maryland” sent by Deb, Ref. [18], it states that in 1776 Thomas was the late (last – he did not die) Sheriff and George French, his brother, is the present high sheriff of Frederick County, Maryland. We suspect the George who took over was not Thomas’ son, as he was born ca. 1755 and would have not had the proper training by 1776. In the era of the British Loyalists, a sheriff was the chief executive having various administration and judicial functions. In Scotland, a sheriff is considered a judge. In May 1780, Thomas sailed to Jamaica and later was promoted to Chief Justice in Jamaica, ca. 1781-82, and died there ca. 1782-83.

Description: sheriff

Marriage

Thomas French m. Catherine Ward on 12 Dec 1750. They named a daughter Catherine. Catherine Ward was b. ca. 1725, perhaps in Prince George’s County, Maryland.

Bible

F412 Thomas French’s Bible, with a record of his descendants. American Genealogy, 1951-52, Vol 27, NYSL 929.A5122. The Thomas French Bible Records, by H. Minot Pitman. Thomas French m. Catherine Ward 12 Dec 1750. Family lived in London, England, and immigrated to Washington, D.C. and NYC. Descendants include George French; Robert Summerfield French, Thomas Gautier French of East Orange, NJ; Harris Hanna French, of Memphis TN, Elise Gautier French who m. William Lowe Rice of Wilmington, DE; and Chauncey French. H. Minot Pitman, b. 1888, d. 1970, was an attorney who became a full-time genealogist and headed several genealogical societies, see http://www.nypl.org/archives/80825.

Jamaica

Leading up to the Revolutionary War, Thomas French, turned over his position of Sheriff of Frederick County, Maryland to his brother George. At this time in England politics, the position of sheriff was for one year. He seemed to have planned his trip to Jamaica, as he sold land in Maryland before he left. He may have supervised the POWs who were sent to Jamaica after the Battle of Camden on 16 Aug 1780. Many soldiers contacted yellow fever at that time and died. However, records show that he was promoted to Chief Justice in Jamaica: “Kilgraston School's earliest records date back to the 13th century where it was called Gilgryston. John Grant, the eldest son of Patrick Grant of Glenlochy, in Strath Spey, Inverness-shire, Scotland, and whose principal wealth was made in Jamaica, was for several years a member of the Assembly there, becoming an assistant Judge of Jamaica's Supreme Court, and eventually succeeded Thomas French as Chief Justice of that island in January 1783, which office he held until 1790”.

“A” Thomas French is listed as a Custos for Kingston in 1780, Speaker pro tem in 1781, and Chief Justice in 1788. The 1782 Almanac calls him the Hon. Thomas French. More research needs to be done to establish correct research. See https://sites.google.com/site/ffrenchfamily/ffrench-s-in-jamaica.

Death

In May 1780, Jamaica was under the jurisdiction of the King of England, and with whom the United States of America was then at war. Thomas must have died between May 1780 and Jan 1783 when his position as Chief Justice of Jamaica was succeeded by John Grant. According to the will of his brother George, Thomas died in 1781; however, the article below shows he was still Chief Justice in May 1782. On this website: http://www.apex.net.au/~tmj/jam-tstr.htm, you will see the names of 4 members of the French family who were testators of wills proved in Jamaica: George, Mary, Sarah, and Thomas. Thomas lived in St. Mary Parish, a county in the northeast of Jamaica.

From the “History of the Parish of Trelawny” by Daniel L. Ogilvie

Land Deeds

1747-1776 George French. We are unsure if this list is all the same George French or two different men named George French. For example, the George French who owned land in Baltimore is definitely George French from FFA Chart #166, in that his tract of land of 714 acres named “Vale” was added to by his son, who bought 913 more acres called “Vale”. We do not believe that Chart #195 ever lived or owned land in Baltimore County. However, both men named George French from FFA Chart #195 (non-British) and from FFA Chart #166 (British) owned land in Frederick Co., MD. The original land for Frederick Co. was formed in 1748 from Prince George’s Co. Then in 1776, Frederick Co. was partially divided into 3 smaller sections: Montgomery, Washington, and Frederick Counties. FFA Chart #195 resided in Montgomery Co., and FFA Chart #166 resided in Washington Co., which were both originally Frederick Co. before 1776, so that is where the confusion lies in trying to differentiate land deeds of these two men with the same name, George French.

Description: Description: Maryland3

Description: Description: Maryland1

View this list on this website at LandPatentOwnersWashCo1730-1830.pdf. Could someone please check the 100+ names on this list to see if there are any other connections to FFA Chart #195, or do these names belong to FFA Chart #36 or #166, and report back to me at marafrench@mindspring.com.

All lands in possession of Thomas FRENCH of Baltimore County, including a contract dated 26 Feb 1777 for 1900 pounds current money, sold to James CLARKE of Baltimore Town; Clarke executed a bond on same day. The money was paid and property delivered to Clarke; and in May 1780, Thomas FRENCH moved to the island of Jamaica, which was under the jurisdiction of the King of England and with whom the United States of America was then at war. Thomas died in Jamaica ca. 1781-82. In 1781, a law was passed which confiscated all British property, diverting it back to the State; however, James CLARKE was entitled to said land on 3 Apr 1790 when he assigned it to George FRENCH, (parts “Durham” and “George’s Adventure”).

On 31 Mar 1775 George Poe of Frederick, MD, mortgaged “The Forrest” to Thomas French for £100. He signed “George POH” in old German script.

On 17 Feb 1776 George Poe of Frederick Co., MD, paid Thomas French £105 pounds 5 shillings who then released the mortgage on “The Forrest.”

ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY LAND PAPERS COLLECTION MS. 2298 Plats, patents, grants, and deeds of Thomas Daniell, Ezekial, Amelia, and Henry Gillis, John, Edward, and Nathan Dorsey, and Thomas and George French; two letters concerning the address of Chester Mills of Queen Anne's County and the vacation of W. M. Lansdale of Bladensburg, Maryland. 13 items, 1685-1792.

 “Settlers of Maryland, 1766-1783”, shows 4 members of the French family: Ariana (wife of James), George (brother of Thomas), George (son of Thomas), and Thomas Esq. (brother of George and James). Counties involved are Fdk (Frederick), Bal (Baltimore), PG (Prince George), and Cha (Charles). See website http://search.ancestry.com/Browse/BookView.aspx?dbid=49358&iid=FLHG_SettlersMaryland6-0005. No information is known as to who were Jenny, Tom, Peter, Hannah, or Betsy, names given for Thomas’ land.

Thomas and his family bought 4,282 acres of land in Maryland. We believe this list contains only those lands owned by the families of FFA Chart #166 and not FFA Chart #195.

Description: SettlersofMaryland

Description: Settlers2

Thomas died in 1782; his sister-in-law Ariana (wife of James) took over Thomas’ estate. Apparently Catherine Ward had died beforehand. We actually have no firm evidence that Thomas French’s wife’s name was Catherine Ward.

All lands in possession of Thomas FRENCH of Baltimore County, including a contract dated 26 Feb 1777 for 1900 pounds current money, sold to James CLARKE of Baltimore Town; Clarke executed a bond on the same day. The money was paid and property delivered to Clarke; and in May 1780, Thomas FRENCH moved to the island of Jamaica, which was under the jurisdiction of the King of England and with whom the United States of America was then at war.  In 1781, a law was passed which confiscated all British property, diverting it back to the State; however, James CLARKE was entitled to said land on 3 Apr 1790 when he assigned it to George FRENCH (parts "Durham" and "George’s Adventure"). On 6 Jun 1803, James Clarke assigned it over to Ariana FRENCH, as George FRENCH had died.

(See Papers #1740 for return of Opinion of Court of Appeals reversing the Chancellor.)

Lands were finally returned to the family by the Court of Appeals.

Chronology of Thomas French’s Life

See Maryland Historical Chronology, 1700-1799. You can also pinpoint estate lands on a 1787 Plot Map of Maryland.

1727 – Close to the date Thomas French was born.

1748 -- Frederick County was formed in 1748 from Prince George’s County.

1750 – Close to the date Thomas French was married most likely in Baltimore County, Maryland.

1769 -- 92 acres "Tom's Venture" in Frederick Co., MD, given to his son George on 29 Nov 1774 until his death in 1803, assigned to Ariana until her death in 1805. Land was “lying to the westward of Fort Cumberland” and “being held since the year 1769”.

1769 -- 913 acres "Vale" in Frederick Co., MD, given to son George on 27 Apr 1776 until his death in 1803, assigned to Ariana until her death in 1805. Land was “lying to the westward of Fort Cumberland” and “being held since the year 1769”.

1769 -- 714 acres "Vale" in Baltimore Co., MD, given to son George on 24 Apr 1776 until his death in 1803, assigned to Ariana until her death in 1805

1771 Nov 3 – Thomas bought “Beauty” of 110 acres, still owned on 23 Jul 1805.

1774 -- THE OLDEST FARMING COMMUNITY

It is doubtful if any other section of the county can claim that as a farming community it antedates Blooming Rose. When Lord Baltimore opened his lands westward of Fort Cumberland in 1774 speculators hastened to the mountains to secure the choicest tracts. One of these speculators was the Rev. Jonthan Boucher, an Anglican clergyman of Annapolis, Maryland. Thomas French, who was Boucher's agent, and Francis Deakins, the surveyor, located for him a large tract on the ridge between the Youghiogheny River and Buffalo Run, west of John Friend's Settlement (Friendsville). It was a fertile plateau. Website: http://www.whilbr.org/itemdetail.aspx?idEntry=7229&dtPointer=1. Fort Cumberland is also where Thomas French’s brother George French settled.

1774-1776 – Thomas bought 4,282 acres of land in Maryland within 3 years of each other.

1774 Nov 3 -- 110 acres "Beauty" in Charles Co., MD, given to son George in 1792 until his death in 1803, assigned to Ariana until her death in 1811

1774 Nov 3 -- 168 acres "Property" in Charles Co., MD, given to son George until his death in 1803, assigned to Ariana until her death in 1811

1774 Nov 3 -- 73 acres "Tit for Tat" in Charles Co., MD, given to son George until his death in 1803, assigned to Ariana until her death in 1811

1774 Nov 8 -- 148 acres "Chance" in Charles Co., MD, given to son George until his death in 1803, assigned to Ariana until her death in 1811

1774 Nov 8 -- 76 acres "Choice" in Charles Co., MD, given to son George until his death in 1803, assigned to Ariana until her death in 1811

1774 Nov 29 -- 943 acres "Brothers" in Frederick Co., MD

1775 Mar 31 -- George Poe of Frederick Co., MD, mortgaged "The Forrest" to Thomas French

1775 Apr 21 -- 384 acres "Durham" in Frederick Co., MD, given to son George until his death in 1803, assigned to Ariana until her death in 1811. George must have been at least 21 years of age in 1775; therefore, born 1754 or before.

1775 Apr 24 -- 40 acres "French's Discovery" in Prince George's Co., MD

1775 Apr 24 -- 225 acres "Rising Sun" in Frederick Co., MD, given to son George until his death in 1803, assigned to Ariana until her death in 1811. The certificate was “signed and sealed by Patrick Lane in the presence of George French 1775-04-24”.

1775 Sep 9 -- 977 acres "Blooming Plains" in Frederick Co., MD, given to son George until his death in 1803, assigned to Ariana until her death in 1811

1775 Oct 13 -- 471 acres "Castle Hannah" in Baltimore Co., MD

1776 Feb 17 -- George Poe of Frederick Co., MD paid Thomas French who released the mortgage on "The Forrest".

1776 Jun 3 -- 210 acres "Betsy's Pleasure Ground” in Baltimore Co., MD

1776 Jun 15 -- 457 acres "Pallentine" in Frederick Co., MD. Joseph Mathias bought it next in 1788, and then sold 170 ½ acres to Henry Mathias in 1801. The description of this farm indicates that the 2-story dwelling house, log kitched attached to it, a double log barn, and an Apple Orchard were all added later. The property is now called the Mathias-Smeach Farm at 3535 Backwoods Road, Bachmans Mills, Carroll Co., MD. Smeach ordered 10,000 bricks intending to brick-case his log cabin, but he died before the work was completed, which was done by his wife as indicated in a 1876 tax assessment. Carroll Co. is due east of Frederick Co., MD. Albeit interesting, the photos on the “Pallentine” website are of a latter date.

1776 -- 913 acres "Vale" in Frederick Co., MD, given to son George until his death in 1803, assigned to Ariana until her death in 1811

1774 Nov 29 – “Brothers” of 943 acres. If you search for “The Brothers” +“Thomas French”, you can read a very lengthy court case about this property which was passed to James Clarke on 25 Oct 1779, but the court refused it. “Brothers” must have referred to brothers Thomas and George French.

1775 Thomas was Sheriff of Frederick County, Maryland.

1776 -- Montgomery County was formed from Frederick County in 1776.

1776 -- Washington County was formed from Frederick County in 1776.

1777 – Thomas sold parts of his land to James Clarke.

1778 Mar – Thomas French Esq. and George French Esq. and Thomas Cresap.

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1778 AugThomas French a(gainst) Thomas Lazear and Thomas Plummer. Washington County Court. Also his brother George French, Esq., against Peter and Thomas Malott. Website: http://www.whilbr.org/itemdetail.aspx?idEntry=3607.

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1779 MarThomas French was still listed in the courts of Washington County, Maryland. Website: http://www.whilbr.org/itemdetail.aspx?idEntry=3730&dtPointer=9.

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1780 – Thomas moved to the island of Jamaica where he was Chief Justice.

1781-82 – Thomas died or his will was written.

1781 May – Apparently Thomas French was presented for high treason according to an excellent genealogy of the Honorable Daniel Dulany, 1722-1797, from the Maryland Historical Magazine published in Baltimore in 1918, website, pages 153-154: http://www.msa.md.gov/megafile/msa/speccol/sc3500/sc3520/000300/000372/pdf/mhmxiii143-160.pdf. I am now not so sure that he became Chief Justice in Jamaica.

1782 Jul 1 Patent of 24 acres of land in Anne Arundel Co. from Thomas French to George French.

1788 Jun – Thomas French’s estate was settled.

1790-1792 -- Charles County Land Records 1790-1792; Liber K#4; Page 536. Dec 7, 1792 from George French of Montgomery County, heir at law to the late Thomas French of Baltimore County, to Thomas Langton of Baltimore town in Baltimore County, for and in consideration of sd Thomas French in his lifetime having sold to James Clarke of Baltimore in Baltimore County, a tract of land called Beauty, lying in CC containing 110 acres and sd Thomas French, by his bond of conveyance given to sd James Clarke, therein obliged himself to make over to sd Clarke, when required, a deed to the afd tract called Beauty, for which sd Thomas French, in his lifetime, was fully paid by sd Clarke, and sd Clarke having sold all his right to sd Beauty in 1778 to the afd Thomas Langton, who began an action of ejectment against Charles Goodrick, late of CC, as lessee of the afd Thomas French, decd, and in sd Court, to wit, Jun Term 1788, did obtain a judgment for ejectment against sd Goodrick. Now I, sd George French, for and in consideration of the foregoing, and for 1 penny to me in hand paid by sd Thomas Langton, I have sold to Langton the land called Beauty in CC, bounded by Moores Ditch, containing about 110 acres. Signed - George French. Wit - John Hollins, Jas Calhoun. This deed was acknowledged in Baltimore County before sd County JPs, Geo Salmon and Jas Calhoun. Certified by Wm Gibson, Clk, B County. Recorded Dec 17, 1792. [An “heir at law” is an heir by right of blood especially to the real property of a person who dies intestate].

1.3* George French, b. ca. 1740 according to census reports of . George was Sheriff of Frederick County, Maryland, in 1776, replacing his brother Thomas who was Sheriff the previous year. George lived to about 94 years old and had become quite wealthy. He is listed in the 1830 census of Allegany Co., Maryland. He was buried on 7 Dec 1834 at the Oak Hill Cemetery in Washington, WDC. A land deed in 1837 indicates that George had died. His great grandmother was a Caroline French, or so was said in one document.

Marriage

George m1. ca. 1776 to Elizabeth Haynes [1]. She was b. 12 May 1751 and d. 16 Sep 1811. See the 1810-1811 epidemic of smallpox in Baltimore. Elizabeth appears in the 1810 census of Maryland with George. They had one daughter, Laney, who states that her mother was German, but certainly Haynes is not a German name. Elizabeth Haynes French appears in the 1800 and 1810 census of Allegany Co., MD. After researching the name, I find that is was originally spelled Haines or Heintz (similar pronunciation in German), and Anthony Haines was b. ca. 1715 in Germany and d. Feb 1791 in Baltimore Co., MD. His wife was Apollonia Wiesel which is also a Germany name, b. 1722 in Darmstadt, Hessen, Germany, d. 1769 in Bedminster, Bucks Co., PA. Laney French was b. 1777. We have no source saying that these are ancestors of Laney, but we found some added information below.

According to "The Billowing Branches" family tree, John Georg Anton (Anthony) Haines was a successful farmer in Manchester area of what is now Carroll County, Maryland. He and his brother Michael were part of a group of Palatines who migrated from Pennsylvania to Maryland because they were being oppressed in York County, PA. They were part of a religious sect called Augsburg Confession, a Protestant statement of faith first approved by Martin Luther in 1530. Anthony purchased “Hawkins Fancy” in 1766, a farm of 277 acres. He also owned 405 acres in Frederick County, MD, named “The Five Daughters”. Anthony took the Oath of Allegiance in 1778 before Hon. Edward Cockey.

George m2. Jane Crabtree on 19 Jan 1813 in Allegany, MD, and had daughter Phoebe in 1814. Jane was b. ca. 1785 in Shipton township, Allegany, MD, 45 years younger than George. She was the dau. of Lewis and Phoebe Crabtree of Washington Co., Maryland, who lived on “Murley’s Run”. Lewis was b. in 1762 in Frederick Co., MD, and he m. Phoebe Crabtree in 1780. Lewis d. 1834 in Allegheny Co., MD, and Phebe d. after 1812. They had these Crabtree children: Hannah, Lenah (1788-1855), Lewis, Jonah, John, Baltzer, Rezin, and Jane, their youngest child who married George French. Jane d. after May 1837 and before 1850. They had one daughter, Phoebe, b. 1814.

Silver Knee Buckles

George was a silversmith and owned a silver mine somewhere near Town Creek, MD. The family tried to find it but never succeeded. It obviously was not far from home because he could leave in the afternoon and return before dark with a bushel or more of ore. He made silver spoons, buttons, and a pair of knee buckles for George Washington. George was a silversmith and made the silver knee buckles for President George Washington. General Washington’s buckles were long and rounded at the ends, the silver rim being heavily chased. They bore his initials “G. W.” in letters of Roman design, which were said to be found on most of his personal possessions. Apparently George Washington had more than one pair of silver knee buckles, not all made by the same person, as depicted below. These are dated 1770-1790 and used to secure the knee-band of breeches.

Crabtree Family

The Crabtree family was from Yorkshire, England. William and Jane Crabtree arrived in Baltimore County, now Harford, in the colony of Maryland in 1705. Their tobacco plantation lay on the confluence of Deer Creek and Stout Bottle Branch in Gunpowder Hundred enarjoppa which was in the mainport. They belonged to Copley parish which later became St. John's Parish (church of England, later the Protestant Episcopal Church). Four land grants totaling 500 acres may be found in the Hall of Records in Annapolis, Md. William Crabtree's will may also be found there. It is dated 1747, and names wife, Jane and children. It is interesting to note that in his will he leaves an Irish Servant lad called Alexander Anderson to his wife; and another servant to son Thomas and a negro boy called Duke to his son John. The descendants of William located in Washington County, Va. and later descendants of this branch located in Kentucky and Tennessee. One of the Washington County family was James Crabtree.
William Crabtree came to America in 1703. William was bonded to James Hogg from 1698-1703 as a Husbandman. Jame Holsted was bonded to James Hogg from 1698-1703. According to family tradition William Crabtree brought his wife Jane, and infant son to America and they settled along Deer Creek, which flows into the Susquehanna River near Port Deposit. The Crabtrees were members of the Church of England and attended the Anglican Church in Old Joppatowne, MD. The Crabtree family grew and prospered in the New World. William increased his land holdings and was even able to purchase the services of an Irish indentured servant name Alexander Anderson. William had a second servant as referred to in his will plus a Negro who may have been an indentured servant or possibly a slave On October 12, 1716, William received a grant of land 'Patent FF #7' of l00 acres in Baltimore County, Maryland. This tract of land called "Labour" lay in Baltimore CO. in Wood Forest. The deed states "beginning at a bounded white oak Standing in a bottom branch of Deer Creek...." 
Several years later on April 1725, he had l00 acres surveyed which he had purchased from Thomas Bond on the south side of Deer Creek. This land was located on a ridge between Winters Run and Deer Creek beginning at three chestnuts being the bounds of Abraham Whitacres land. 
William Crabtree I died on or before September 10, 1756 in Baltimore County, MA. He had made his will almost 10 years before in 1747. Lewis and Phoebe Crabtree are probably descendants of this family, the parents of Jane Crabtree.

Census Records

The surnames Crabtree, McLaughlin, and Shryock appear quite frequently in Allegany Co., MD.

1800 Census of Skipton, Allegany Co., MD, George lived next to William McLaughlin, his son-in-law. At this time George was still married to his first wife, Elizabeth Haynes, who was about his age. George m2. Jane Crabtree in 1813. Elizabeth also appears in the 1810 census below with daughter Laney from George’s first marriage. Elizabeth Haynes French d. 16 Sep 1811 during the small pox epidemic which also killed 4 of their children. See the 1810-1811 epidemic of smallpox in Baltimore.

Both George and his wife were over 45 years of age; therefore, both born before 1755.

0-0-0-0-1, 0-0-0-0-1, one slave

1810 Census of Allegany Co., MD

George 0-0-0-0-1, 0-0-1-0-1, one slave

William McLaughlin and Lewis Crabtree lived nearby. William McLaughlin married George’s daughter Laney, and George married Lewis Crabtree’s daughter Jane. The letters in bold show the ages of those in this census in 1810:  e   h   j   l

a -- M<10       Free white males under 10 years of age
b -- 10 - 16  "    "      "    10 years and under 16
c -- 16 – 26     "    "      "    16   "    "    "   26 including heads of families
d -- 26 – 45     "    "      "    26   "    "    "   45      "             "     "     "
e -- 45 >        "    "      "    45   "    "  upwards (George)
f -- F<10        Free white females under 10 years of age
g -- 10 - 16      "     "     "   10 years and under 16
h -- 16 – 26     "     "     "   16   "    "    "   26 including heads of families (b. 1784-1794) (Jane, b. 1785)
i -- 26 – 45      "     "     "   26   "    "    "   45         "      "   "     "
j -- 45 >         "     "     "   45   "    "  upwards (Elizabeth), d. 1811.
k -- Free        All other free persons except Indians not taxed.
l -- Slaves      Slaves.

Lewis Crabtree, George’s father-in-law, lives next door. Jane may have been a family caretaker who married George after George’s first wife died in 1811.

1820 Census of Allegany, MD

p. 36: 
George French 0-0-0-0-0-1, 1-0-0-0-1, possibly 2 slaves,
just outside of Oldtown...next door to Lewis Crabtree

1 male over 45, born before 1775 (George)
1 female under 10 (Phoebe), b. 1814
1 female 26-44, born after 1776 (Jane Crabtree) m. in 1813.

1 female slave under 14
1 female slave 26-44

Lewis Crabtree, George’s father-in-law, lives next door. This proves that George remarried late in life and had daughter Phoebe when his wife was 29 years old.

1830 Census of Allegany, MD

Next to Wm McLaughlin, his son-in-law: 
George French: 1 male age 20-30, 1 male age 90-100, 1 female age 40-50

0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Lewis Crabtree, George’s father-in-law, lives next door. Here George French shows:
1 male age 20-30
1 male age 90-100 George, b. 1730-1740 [actually 1740]
1 female age 40-50 who is Jane Crabtree, b. 1780-1790 [actually 1780]. Looking at the next census, Jane must have been born very close to 1780.

1840 Census of Town Creek, Allegany County, Maryland   

Jane is living alone, age 60-70, which means she was b. between 1770-1780. Her father Lewis Crabtree is living next door, also other Crabtree families live in the area. Lewis Shryock also lives in the area and so does Berry McLaughlin and Upton Perrin who are mentioned on this website.

Land Deeds

Although it is difficult determining which George is which, we have some guidelines:

For George French, brother of Thomas:

§  Deeds before 1770 and deed after 1803.

§  Deeds between 1770-1803 are either George French, brother of Thomas or son of Thomas.

§  Deeds that mention neighbor Gabriel Jacob.

§  Deeds from Allegany Co., MD, Montgomery Co., MD, and Frederick Co., MD.

§  Deeds mentioning Crabtree (his wife), McLaughlin (daughter Laney's husband), Shryock (daughter Phoebe's husband), Allegany Co., MD, Skipton, Oldtown, Perrin, Prince George's County, Frederick County, owned land since 1747, Baltimore County by 1776 owned his father's land, Gabriel Jacob (neighbor), Thomas Langton, Jacob Young, Thomas Perrin, Charles Goodrich, Thomas Langton.

For George French, son of Thomas:

§  Deeds that mention George and Ariana together.

§  Deeds that mention James Clarke.

§  Charles County, Anne Arundel Country, MD, Baltimore Co., MD.

Chronology of George French’s Life

See Maryland Historical Chronology, 1700-1799. Also see Ref. [27] in the Bibliography. Apparently Thomas had a brother and a son named George, so that the distinction is difficult.

1740 George French born or thereabouts. He is unlike the George French of FFA Chart #195 who was b. ca. 1726 but lived in the same area.

1748 -- Frederick County was formed in 1748 from Prince George’s County.

1767 The southern boundary of Pennsylvania, especially the famous Mason-Dixon Line dividing Pennsylvania and Maryland, which was surveyed and marked by the English team of Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon in 1767 and approved in Britain two years later, ended arguments begun when Charles II had issued Pennsylvania’s Charter in 1681.

1770 Apr 25 – surveyed 331 ½ acres on 25 Apr 1770 and passed on 16 Sep 1784 called “The Granery” for George French in Washington Co., MD. See resizable map.

1775-1783 Revolutionary War.

1775 George French bought 456 acres called “George’s Adventure” in Washington Co., MD; however, the description below states that it is in Frederick County, Maryland. See LandPatentOwnersWashCo1730-1830.pdf. This was land at first owned by his brother, Thomas.

George’s Adventure – Frederick County, Maryland. See resizable map.

Description: GeorgesAdventure

1776 -- Montgomery County was formed from Frederick County in 1776.

1776 -- Washington County was formed from Frederick County in 1776.

1776George French m1. perhaps ca. 1776 to most likely a German lady as their daughter, Laney, states that she was German. Laney was b. 1777. She must have died between 1810 and 1813 as she appears in the 1800 and 1810 census of Allegany Co., MD.

1776 Apr 27 George French bought 1627 acres called “Vale” in Maryland, “lying to the westward of Fort Cumberland” and “being held since the year 1769” by Thomas French. The Vale -- Frederick County, Maryland. See resizable map. At about this time he also started a family.

Description: Vale

1783 George French. St. Catharines, 1314 acres. Notes: George French and Thomas Langton. WA Upper Old Town p. 12. MSA S1161-10-8. 1/4/5/53

1783 George French. WA Skipton p. 18. MSA S1161-11-4. 1/4/5/54. George paid taxes in Skipton and possessed Thomas Cresap’s old land back in Washington Co., MD [2].

1783 – SNAVELY Family in the area:
Conrod Snavely. Philpott Enlarged, pt, 300 acres. WA Lower Antietam and Sharpsburg p. 36. MSA S1161-11-1. 1/4/5/54
Henry Snavely.
sundry tracts, 806 3/4 acres. WA Salisbury and Conocheague p. 48. MSA S1161-11-3. 1/4/5/54
Henry Snavely.
Snavelys Success, 300 acres. WA Salisbury and Conocheague p. 48. MSA S1161-11-3. 1/4/5/54
Henry Snavely.
3 Houses & Lotts. WA Elizabeth p. 30. MSA S1161-11-4. 1/4/5/54
Henry Snavely.
Scant of Timber, pt and Funks Land, pt, 649 acres. WA Elizabeth p. 30. MSA S1161-11-4. 1/4/5/54
Jacob Snavely.
Blum Run, pt and Resurvey on Egypt, 92 acres. WA Salisbury and Conocheague p. 48. MSA S1161-11-3. 1/4/5/54
John Snavely.
sundry tracts, 361 acres. WA Fort Frederick and Linton p. 52. MSA S1161-10-9. 1/4/5/53
John Snavely.
Shoal Spring, 50 acres. WA Upper Antietam and Jerusalem p. 61. MSA S1161-10-9. 1/4/5/53
John Snavely.
Snavelys Success, 163 acres. WA Salisbury and Conocheague p. 49. MSA S1161-11-3. 1/4/5/54
Michal Snavely.
WA Fort Frederick and Linton p. 52. MSA S1161-10-9. 1/4/5/53
See 1783 Tax Assessments in Maryland: http://www.msa.md.gov/msa/stagser/s1400/s1437/html/1437wa.html.

1788 – TURNER, JOHN B., Clk. (CH).
Dates: 1788, Jun.
Records of the cases of “Thomas French vs Charles Goodrich” and “George French vs Thomas Langton” .
MSA S999-6-441 MdHR 19990-05-05/03  Location: 1/7/3/18 (Maryland State Papers, confiscated British Property Paper). [Note that in 1778, Charles Goodrich was living in Port Tobacco East in Charles Co., MD.]

1789 Allegany County created from western part of Washington County, Maryland.

1790 Aug 9 – “Bones Meadow”. George French acquired 25,059 ½ acres called in Allegany County, Maryland, on 9 Aug 1790. This document contains 17 pages including a map. The second page of this land deed mentions Gabriel Jacob; therefore, this land is that of George in the 1st generation who died after 1831, land originally belonging to Valantine Bone” (the “t” was not crossed).

Description: Macintosh HD:Users:Mara:Desktop:dsl00132-1.jpg

1790 November Session of Laws of Maryland concerning right of state to certain lands relinquished. See website sent from Deb, Ref. [18]: http://www.msa.md.gov/megafile/msa/speccol/sc2900/sc2908/000001/000192/html/am192--2876.html.

1790 George French bought 93 acres called “Homony Rock” in Washington Co., MD, near Homony Isle. See LandPatentOwnersWashCo1730-1830.pdf.

Homony Isle -- Frederick County, Maryland. See resizable map. One source says Homony Isle is in Allegany County and one says it is in Frederick County.

Description: HomonyIsle

1790-1792 -- Charles County Land Records 1790-1792; Liber K#4; Page 536. Dec 7, 1792 from George French of Montgomery County, heir at law to the late Thomas French of Baltimore County, to Thomas Langton of Baltimore town in Baltimore County, for and in consideration of sd Thomas French in his lifetime having sold to James Clarke of Baltimore in Baltimore County, a tract of land called Beauty, lying in CC containing 110 acres and sd Thomas French, by his bond of conveyance given to sd James Clarke, therein obliged himself to make over to sd Clarke, when required, a deed to the afd tract called Beauty, for which sd Thomas French, in his lifetime, was fully paid by sd Clarke, and sd Clarke having sold all his right to sd Beauty in 1778 to the afd Thomas Langton, who began an action of ejectment against Charles Goodrick, late of CC, as lessee of the afd Thomas French, decd, and in sd Court, to wit, Jun Term 1788, did obtain a judgment for ejectment against sd Goodrick. Now I, sd George French, for and in consideration of the foregoing, and for 1 penny to me in hand paid by sd Thomas Langton, I have sold to Langton the land called Beauty in CC, bounded by Moores Ditch, containing about 110 acres. Signed - George French. Wit - John Hollins, Jas Calhoun. This deed was acknowledged in Baltimore County before sd County JPs, Geo Salmon and Jas Calhoun. Certified by Wm Gibson, Clk, B County. Recorded Dec 17, 1792. [An “heir at law” is an heir by right of blood especially to the real property of a person who dies intestate].

1791 Sep 24 -- “Friendship” Maryland Montgomery ONEIL Bernard Elizabeth Deed September 24, 1791-September 24, 1791 Folio 664  Bernard O'Neil to Joseph Watson part of tract called "Friendship" 8 1/4 a. Wit.: George French, Charles Magruder. Elizabeth O'Neil, wife of Bernard O'Neil concurs Land Records Of Montgomery County, Maryland Liber D Sween Library, Rockville, Montgomery County, Maryland.

1792 Apr 23 – Lease from Hugh Jones of Allegany Co MD to John Jeremiah Jacob of Hampshire, VA...land bounded by lines of Gabriel Jacob & George French. Witnesses: William Twilby & Elizabeth Cresap.

Bought land at Town Creek in 1796: one acre from Griffith Johnson and 91 acres of "Crabtree's Folly" from James Crabtree. In 1806 he bought 104 more acres of "Crabtree's Folly"

His daughter Laney was "of German descent". According to his will, he married twice, and had two daughters alive at the time of the will. (ref: p. 427 of Crabtrees in America) He married Jane Crabree in 1813 (She was 45 yrs his junior(!) and she had a sister Lenah 1788-1855...) They had daughter in 1814.
Find "Crabtrees of America" by Ruth Cromwell Crabtree. p. 427 says "Per the will of George French, [he] had two daughters; Laney French and Phoebe French. His great grandmother was a Caroline French and he feel's she was a cousin to the daughter....."
??? find rest of passage

George French bought land at Town Creek in 1796 called “Crabtree Folly”: one acre from Griffith Johnson and 91 acres of "Crabtree's Folly" from James Crabtree. Thereafter they bought 104 more acres of “Crabtree’s Folly” ca. 1806.

In April 1818, 9 acres of “Crabtree’s Folly” was bought by William McLaughlin, George’s son-in-law, for $72. He also bought another section of “Crabtree’s Folly” in Sep 1828 for $1.

1792 Apr 23 -- George French owned land at Skipton (Old Town) and 1314 acres with Thomas Langton at Upper Old Town.
23 Apr 1792: Lease from Hugh Jones of Allegany Co MD to John Jeremiah Jacob of Hampshire, VA...land bounded by lines of Gabriel Jacob & George French. Witnesses: William Twilby & Elizabeth Cresap.

1792 Apr 23 -- Lease from Hugh Jones of Allegany Co MD to John Jeremiah Jacob of Hampshire, VA...land bounded by lines of Gabriel Jacob & George French. Witnesses: William Twilby & Elizabeth Cresap. This was a resurvey of land originally belonging to “Valantine Bone” (the “t” wasn’t crossed).

1792 May 10 – “Rinds Ridge”, FRENCH, GEORGE to LATIMER, RANDOLPH B.
Dates: 1792, May. 10.
Application for purchase of "Rinds Ridge" in VA.
MSA S999-2-108 MdHR 19990-02-10/20  Location: 1/7/3/17 (Maryland State Papers, confiscated British Property Paper).

1793 Apr 6 -- 1793/04/06
1160: James Comly vs. George Brown, George French, Nicholas Merryman, Deborah Merryman, Rachel Griffith, John Griffith, Eleanor Griffith, Elizabeth Griffith, John Merryman, Moses Merryman, Eleanor Merryman, Micajah Merryman, Nicholas Merryman, Eleanor Merryman, Sarah Merryman, Mary Merryman, and Eleanor Ensor. BA. Contract to purchase Greens Good Will. 
Accession No.: 17,898-1160-1/2 MSA S512-2- 1227 Location: 1/36/1/ [31].

1793 Apr 24 – “Port Tobacco”. SEWELL, CHARLES, JR. (Port Tobacco) to MARBURY, WILLIAM, Agent (AN).
Dates: 1793, Apr. 24.
Records pertaining to a suit brought by Mr. French.
MSA S999-6-440 MdHR 19990-05-05/02  Location: 1/7/3/18 (Maryland State Papers, confiscated British Property Paper

1793 Jun 10 – “Hop Yard”. LATIMER, RANDOLPH B., Agent to CASANOVE, PETER; BAILE, WILLIAM; FRENCH, GEORGE.
Dates: 1793, Jun. 10.
Sale certificate for "Hop Yard" in Washington, D. C., confiscated property of Robert Douglass: See 11/4/3.
MSA S999-12-748 MdHR 19990-11-04/04  Location: 1/7/3/20 (Maryland State Papers, confiscated British Property Paper).

1793 Sep 26 – FRENCH, GEORGE; CASANOVE, PETER to BLODGET, SAMUEL; GREENLEAF, JAMES.
Dates: 1793, Sep. 26.
Transfer of title for Washington, D. C., land.
MSA S999-12-747 MdHR 19990-11-04/04  Location: 1/7/3/20 (Maryland State Papers, confiscated British Property Paper).

1795 -- 1795/12/11
1796: George French and William Baily vs. William King. MO. Estate of Richard Thompson - lots in Georgetown.
Accession No.: 17,898-1796 MSA S512-2- 1871 Location: 1/36/1/ [31].

1796 -- Bought land at Town Creek in 1796: one acre from Griffith Johnson and 91 acres of "Crabtree's Folly" from James Crabtree. In 1806 he bought 104 more acres of "Crabtree's Folly". George French lived near Lewis Crabtree and was therefore involved with the family long before he married Jane Crabtree, who at this time, was only about 16 years of age. They wed in 1813 when she was about 33.

1797 -- 1797/10/30
1414: William Deakins, Jr., Marsham Waring, Henry Waring, John Mason, Fenwick Mason, Uriah Forrest, James McCubbin Lingan, Joseph Evans Rowles, George French, Bernard Gilpin, and James White vs. Nicholas Young. MO. Estate of Peter Casanere - Addition to Fellowship, Resurvey on Mill Seat. Recorded (Chancery Record) 41, p. 73. 
Accession No.: 17,898-1414-1/3 MSA S512-2- 1485 Location: 1/36/1/ [31].

1798 Jun 23 -- MARBURY, WILLIAM, Agent to FRENCH, GEORGE; BAILEY, WILLIAM; CASANOVE, PETER.
Dates: 1798, Jun. 23.
Purchase certificate for “Hop Yard” in Washington, D. C.
MSA S999-12-751 MdHR 19990-11-04/07  Location: 1/7/3/20 (Maryland State Papers, confiscated British Property Paper).

1802 Sep 17 -- p241: Book 5, Page 104; 17 September 1802; Patrick and Mary Murdock, of Allegany Co., Maryland to George French, of same, Gabriel Jacobs, of Ohio Co., Virginia and Daniel Fetter, of Allegany Co., Maryland, for 5 shillings, 118 acres...Grape Creek...Adjoining William Thompson and Isaac Stackhouse. Signed Patrick Murdock and Mary Murdock. Md. JP: Hanson...

1806 – George French bought 104 more acres of "Crabtree's Folly".


1811 -- See the 1810-1811 epidemic of smallpox in Baltimore. George’s first wife, Elizabeth Haynes French, d. 16 Sep 1811. Daughter Laney was about 34 years old.

1812 – War of 1812.

1812 -- The following very long court case on 2 Jan 1812 that follows, Jacob Young and George French received 3 tracks of land:
“Zero”, 53 acres
Panmure”, 375 acres
part of “Pasttime”, 178 acres
all lying between Gatoctin and South mountains in Frederick Co., MD
and that they needed to dispose of these 3 lands for the best price.

1813 Jan 19 -- George m2. Jane Crabtree on 19 Jan 1813 in Allegany, MD, and had daughter Phoebe in 1814. Jane was b. ca. 1785 in Shipton township, Allegany, MD, 45 years younger than George. She was the dau. of Lewis and Phoebe Crabtree of Washington Co., Maryland, who lived on “Murley’s Run”. Lewis was b. in 1762 in Frederick Co., MD, and he m. Phoebe Crabtree in 1780. Lewis d. 1834 in Allegheny Co., MD, and Phebe d. after 1812. They had these Crabtree children: Hannah, Lenah (1788-1855), Lewis, Jonah, John, Baltzer, Rezin, and Jane, their youngest child who married George French. Jane d. 1832. They had one daughter, Phoebe, b. 1814. I realize these calculations don’t agree with one another and it would, but more research is needed.

1820 -- 1820/07/12
11134: Isabella Scott [named in George Scott’s will of 1771], Elias B. Caldwell, and George French vs. Elizabeth Weems [George French’s dau.), Dr. John Weems [George French’s son-in-law], George French, Robert French, Thomas French, Catherine French, Charles French, Marianne C. French, and Virginia French. AL, CH. Estate of George French - Walnut Bottom, Castle Hill, Durham in AL. Also Chance, Choice Property, Tit for Tat in CH. 
Accession No.: 17,898-11134 MSA S512-14-10973 Location: 1/39/3/

1820 -- 1820/12/26
11212: Matthias Shaffner, John Shaffner, Samuel Ringgold, and Daniel Schnebly vs. George French, Eleanor Kennedy, and Michael Houser. WA. Contract to purchase Nelsons Folly. Plats.
Accession No.: 17,898-11212-1/2 MSA S512-14-11047 Location: 1/39/3/

1828 Sep 29George French wrote his will, close to the age of 94. He is listed in the 1830 census of Allegany Co., Maryland See http://freepages.misc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~shopefamily/Tree/famf225.html.

His daughter Laney was "of German descent". According to his will, he married twice, and had two daughters alive at the time of the will. (ref: p. 427 of Crabtrees in America).

1834 Dec 7 -- George French was buried on 7 Dec 1834 at the Oak Hill Cemetery in Washington, WDC.

1837 May 5 -- At the request of Thomas Perrian & others this deed was recorded this 5th day of May 1837

This Indenture made this seventh day of March in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and thirty seven Between Lewis G. Shryock and Phebe Shryock his wife and Jane French widow of George French deceased of the one part and Thomas Perrin James K. Perrin Nathan Wilson Isaiah McLaughlin and Thomas R. C. Martin all of Allegany County and State of Maryland Trustees in trust for the uses and purposes herein aftermentioned of the other part Witnesseth that the said Lewis G. Shryock and Phebe Shryock his wife and Jane French widow of George French dec'd for in consideration of the sum of one dollar specie, to them in hand paid at and upon the sealing and delivery of these presents; the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, have given granted bargained sold released confirmed and conveyed, and by these presents do give grant bargain sell release, confirm and convey unto them the said Thomas Perrin Jas. K. Perrin Nathan Wilson, Isaiah McLaughlin and Thomas R. C. Martin and their successors (Trustees in trust for the uses and purposes herein after mentioned and declared) all the estate right, title interest property, claim and demand whatsoever in law or equity which they, the said Lewis G. Shryock and Phebe Shryock his wife and Jane French widow of George French dec'd have in, to, or upon all and singular a certain lot or piece of land, situate, lying and being in the County and State aforesaid, bounded and butted as follows, to wit;

1837 May 5 At the request of Thomas Perrian (Perrin) & others this deed was recorded this 5th day of May 1837. This Indenture made this seventh day of March in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and thirty seven Between Lewis G. Shryock and Phebe Shryock his wife [daughter of George and Jane French] and Jane French widow of George French deceased of the one part and Thomas Perrin James K. Perrin Nathan Wilson Isaiah McLaughlin and Thomas R. C. Martin all of Allegany County and State of Maryland Trustees in trust for the uses and purposes herein aftermentioned of the other part Witnesseth that the said Lewis G. Shryock and Phebe Shryock his wife and Jane French widow of George French dec'd for in consideration of the sum of one dollar specie, to them in hand paid at and upon the sealing and delivery of these presents; the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, have given granted bargained sold released confirmed and conveyed, and by these presents do give grant bargain sell release, confirm and convey unto them the said Thomas Perrin Jas. K. Perrin Nathan Wilson, Isaiah McLaughlin and Thomas R. C. Martin and their successors (Trustees in trust for the uses and purposes herein after mentioned and declared) all the estate right, title interest property, claim and demand whatsoever in law or equity which they, the said Lewis G. Shryock and Phebe Shryock his wife [daughter of George and Jane French] and Jane French widow of George French dec'd have in, to, or upon all and singular a certain lot or piece of land, situate, lying and being in the County and State aforesaid, bounded and butted as follows, to wit;

With this deed Lewis Shryock, his wife Phebe [daughter of George and Jane French], and the widow Jane French sold one half acre of land to Thomas Perrin, James K. Perrin, Nathan Wilson, Isaiah McLaughlin, and Thomas R. C. Martin for one dollar, for the expressed purpose "that they shall erect and build, or cause to be created and built thereon a house or place of Worship, for the use of the members of the Methodist Episcopal Church in the United States of America." Furthermore it gives a good enough description of the property to allow some guesses as to its location:

Beginning at a stone standing on the west side of the Town Creek road, and about one hundred and fifty yards North west from the dwelling house of said Lewis G. Shryock and running parallel with the said Road North twenty eight degrees West ten perches...

The survey suggests that some of the boundary was coincident with the boundary between the French and Crabtree land. George and Jane French had purchased from James Crabtree in 1795 91 acres of the Crabtree Folly land. The survey data given in the French deed is quite difficult to reconcile with the other maps, but it is clear that it abutted on the north that portion of Crabtree Folly purchased by John Perrin. Thus the church land would have been in the middle of the region shown in black outline below. I have placed the propriety (the pink square) on a portion of Town Creek road which is going in the proper direction, and the structure outlined by that square is about one tenth of a mile (150 yards) from the other dwelling on that road. Given that the church was mentioned in the historical record as late as 1890, and in land records as late as 1939, I am not averse to assuming that it is present on the 1900 topographic map.

1839 Sep 5 – Land Deed mentions that both William and Laney McLaughlin are deceased.

ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY LAND PAPERS COLLECTION MS. 2298 Plats, patents, grants, and deeds of Thomas Daniell, Ezekial, Amelia, and Henry Gillis, John, Edward, and Nathan Dorsey, and Thomas and George French; two letters concerning the address of Chester Mills of Queen Anne's County and the vacation of W. M. Lansdale of Bladensburg, Maryland. 13 items, 1685-1792.

Death

George wrote his will on 29 Sep 1828 in Allegany Co., MD, and was buried on 7 Dec 1834 at the Oak Hill Cemetery in Washington, WDC. Jane Crabtree French died after May 1837 and before 1850.

Second Generation

Children of Thomas French and Catherine Ward, 1.2

2.1 Catherine French, b. ca. 1751.

2.2* George French, b. ca. 1754 as he had to be 21 years of age when his father gave him land in 1775 and when he bought land in 1776.

George had written his will on 12 Dec 1798, he died on 6 Jun 1803, and his will was proved 23 Jul 1805. Ariana, widow of George French, took over all the lands of this family until her death.

Marriage

George French m. Ariana or Arienne Scott in 1777. She was the daughter of George Scott who names his daughter in his will of 1771. Ariana’s mother was Elizabeth Gaskin. George Scott was b. 1700 in Scotland and d. 25 Sep 1771 in Prince George’s Co., MD. Elizabeth Gaskin was b. before Apr 1711 in Prince George’s Co., MD, and d. after 1772 in Prince George’s Co., MD.

In the 1800 census of Georgetown, Washington, D.C., there are two women listed as Ariana French: one as Ariana Bankson French [1st Generation] and another one as Ariana Scott French [2nd Generation].

1800, Ariana Bankson French -- Ariana French (First Generation of this line) appears in the 1800 census of Montgomery County, Maryland, unspecified number in household, but she was listed as head of household with 10 slaves. When she died, the 10 slaves were inherited by Thomas French, the son of her brother-in-law Thomas, as witnessed in the 1810 census where Thomas was living alone with 10 slaves. Ariana died in 1805 and Thomas died in 1811, both with no issue. See the 1810-1811 epidemic of smallpox in Baltimore. Thomas was the son of Ariana’s brother-in-law, George French.

1800, Ariana Scott FrenchAriana French (Second Generation of this line) is listed in the 1800 census of Georgetown, Washington D.C. living with:

2 white males ages 10-15, b. 1785-1790, Robert and Charles
2 white males ages 16-26, b. 1774-1784, George and Thomas
1 white female age 10-15, b. 1785-1790, Catherine
1 white female age 26-44, b. 1756 or after, Ariana Scott French
and 13 slaves, a total of 19.

The 13 slaves were far more than any woman had at that time. She was living next door to John Weems who was the husband of Elizabeth French (daughter of George French), b. 1775, d. before 1811 in Montgomery Co., MD. John Weems was b. 1768, d. 1808.

This second Ariana French is Ariana Scott French, the wife of George French, 2.2, in the Second Generation. Most likely she was named after her aunt, Ariana Bankson French, of the First Generation, 1.1. This proves that the French and Scott families knew each other ca. 1755 and that they probably lived nearby.

Ariana Scott French had 3 sisters (Margaret, Ann, and Isabelle) and a brother Andrew. The will of her sister Margaret in the DC Probate Records shows that Margaret wrote her will on 8 Jul 1799 in Georgetown, and it was probated 14 May 1806. She had a brother Andrew, sister Ann Boyd and her daughter Elizabeth Boyd, nephew George French [son of Ariana], sister Ariana French and her six children, Elizabeth Weems and her son George French Weems. This will was executed by George French and Isabella Scott.

George Scott was the Sheriff of Charles, Prince George’s, and Frederick (1766-1768) Counties. Then in 1769 Normand Bruce was Sheriff, and James Hackman in 1772, and Lawrence O’Neil in 1773, and thereafter in 1775 Thomas French of the First Generation was Sheriff. Most likely that is how these families met one another. George Scott was b. 1770 in Malenie, Midlothian (just south of Edinburgh), Scotland, and d. 25 Sep 1771 in Prince George’s Co., MD.

Description: Macintosh HD:Users:Mara:Desktop:600.jpeg

George Scott arrived in Maryland in 1730 at age 30. George Scott’s will reads: To wife Elizabeth. Children: Margaret, Ann, Isabella, Ariana, George, and children unnamed. Mentions: will of mother-in-law Margaret Dick. Executors: son George and son-in-law Robert Peter. Witness: John Gary, Alexander Skinner, Wm. M. Beall. See http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/12651527/person/-210893706. George might have named his daughter after Ariana French of the First Generation.

The will of Margaret Scott, sister of Ariana Scott French, of Georgetown, WDC, 8 Jul 1799 probated 14 May 1806:

Brother Andrew

Sister Ann Boyd and her daughter Elizabeth Boyd

Nephew George French [see 3.4]

Sister Ariana French and her six children [see 2.2]

Elizabeth Weems and her son George French Weems [see 3.1]

Exec George French and Isabella Scott

Margaret, Ariana, Ann and Isabelle are all named in George Scott’s 1771 will as his daughters.

Land Deeds

1775 Apr 24 – George received land from his father, Thomas, called “Rising Sun” with 225 acres. The certificate was “signed and sealed by Patrick Lane in the presence of George French” This could indicate that George was not yet 21 and of age to sign, in other words, b. 1755 or after.

Description: Maryland1

1777 Feb 26 -- 384 acres "Durham" in Frederick Co., MD, received from his father, Thomas, which he bought on 21 Apr 1775

1777 Feb 26 -- 456 acres "George's Adventure" in Frederick Co., MD, received from his father, Thomas or from his uncle George?????

unknown date -- 24 acres "Wats Left" in Frederick Co., MD

1781 -- a law was passed which confiscated all British property, diverting it back to the State; however, James CLARKE was entitled to said land on 3 Apr 1790 when he assigned it to George FRENCH, the son of Thomas (parts "Durham" and "George’s Adventure"). On 6 Jun 1803, George died, as the land was assigned to Ariana FRENCH, his wife.

James Clarke was b. 24 Sep 1750 in Frederick Co., Maryland, and married on 28 May 1769 in Baltimore, Maryland to Rachael Rock. They eventually moved to Nelson Co., KY. The Clarke family might be connected to the French family in that Thomas’ grandson, Charles, had married a Clarke. See http://www.chartiers.com/crumrine/twp-jefferson.html.

See website about Maryland laws (http://www.msa.md.gov/megafile/msa/speccol/sc2900/sc2908/000001/000192/html/am192--2876.html):

"NOVEMBER SESSION, 1790. . . .  No. 2.

WHEREAS it appears to this general assembly, that on the 21st of April, 1775, a patent was granted to George French, for a tract of land called “George's Adventure”, containing 456 acres, and that on the 27th of April and 24th of October, 1776, patents were granted to the said George French, for another tract called the “Vale”, containing 1627 acres, lying to the westward of Fort Cumberland, and that the same has been held by the father of the petitioner [Thomas French], and those claiming under him, since the year 1769, and have been considerably improved, RESOLVED, That the right of the state to the said lands be relinquished, any former claim to the said lands on behalf of the state notwithstanding."

From Linda, Ref. [11]: Regarding the land that George French owned, I analyzed the situation to interpret that the person who made the application was George French and that his father owned the property since 1769. So we need a 1769 deed check. It seems that an application by George French was in the works in 1775 and 1776 but not granted until 1790 because of the Revolutionary War.

1790 – George is listed in the 1790 census of Montgomery Co., Maryland, with 4 males under age 16, born after 1774, and 6 females of all ages, a family of 11.

1792George French is listed with his father, who was deceased, on land records in Charles County, stating that he (George) was from Montgomery County and that his father (Thomas) was from Baltimore County. The names Thomas Langton and James Clarke are mentioned in this deed (they had British roots). The name Thomas Langton is also mentioned in a deed with George French in Allegany Co., Maryland, to where he moved ca. 1797; also, these 2 men are listed in the 1783 Tax Assessment records of Allegany Co., Maryland in 1783. See http://www.msa.md.gov/msa/stagser/s1400/s1437/html/1437wa.html.

1792 Charles County Land Records 1790-1792; Liber K#4; Page 536. Dec 7, 1792 from George French of Montgomery County, heir at law to the late Thomas French of Baltimore County, to Thomas Langton of Baltimore town in Baltimore County, for and in consideration of sd Thomas French in his lifetime having sold to James Clarke of Baltimore in Baltimore County, a tract of land called “Beauty”, lying in CC containing 110 acres and sd Thomas French, by his bond of conveyance given to sd James Clarke, therein obliged himself to make over to sd Clarke, when required, a deed to the afd tract called “Beauty”, for which sd Thomas French, in his lifetime, was fully paid by sd Clarke, and sd Clarke having sold all his right to sd “Beauty” in 1778 to the afd Thomas Langton, who began an action of ejectment against Charles Goodrick, late of CC, as lessee of the afd Thomas French, decd, and in sd Court, to wit, Jun Term 1788, did obtain a judgment for ejectment against sd Goodrick. Now I, sd George French, for and in consideration of the foregoing, and for 1 penny to me in hand paid by sd Thomas Langton, I have sold to Langton the land called “Beauty” in CC, bounded by Moores Ditch, containing about 110 acres. Signed - George French. Wit - John Hollins, Jas Calhoun. This deed was acknowledged in Baltimore County before sd County JPs, Geo Salmon and Jas Calhoun. Certified by Wm Gibson, Clk, B County. Recorded Dec 17, 1792.

1792 FRENCH, GEORGE to LATIMER, RANDOLPH B.
Dates: 1792, May. 10.
Application for purchase of "Rinds Ridge" in VA.
MSA S999-2-108 MdHR 19990-02-10/20  Location: 1/7/3/17 (Maryland State Papers, confiscated British Property Paper).

1792George French owned land at Skipton (Old Town) and 1314 acres with Thomas Langton at Upper Old Town.
23 Apr 1792: Lease from Hugh Jones of Allegany Co MD to John Jeremiah Jacob of Hampshire, VA...land bounded by lines of Gabriel Jacob & George French. Witnesses: William Twilby & Elizabeth Cresap.


1793 – SEWELL, CHARLES, JR. (Port Tobacco) to MARBURY, WILLIAM, Agent (AN).
Dates: 1793, Apr. 24.
Records pertaining to a suit brought by Mr. French.
MSA S999-6-440 MdHR 19990-05-05/02  Location: 1/7/3/18 (Maryland State Papers, confiscated British Property Paper)

1793 FRENCH, GEORGE; CASANOVE, PETER to BLODGET, SAMUEL; GREENLEAF, JAMES.
Dates: 1793, Sep. 26.
Transfer of title for Washington, D. C., land.
MSA S999-12-747 MdHR 19990-11-04/04  Location: 1/7/3/20 (Maryland State Papers, confiscated British Property Paper).

1793 – LATIMER, RANDOLPH B., Agent to CASANOVE, PETER; BAILE, WILLIAM; FRENCH, GEORGE.
Dates: 1793, Jun. 10.
Sale certificate for "Hop Yard" in Washington, D. C., confiscated property of Robert Douglass: See 11/4/3.
MSA S999-12-748 MdHR 19990-11-04/04  Location: 1/7/3/20 (Maryland State Papers, confiscated British Property Paper). May not be of this line.

1794Jan 4 George French was appointed the trustee for John D. Cary after which, George Scott had been appointed trustee on 4 Mar 1793.

1795Jan 14 George French, the trustee, filed a petition by himself to sell certain property, as noted in “Reports of cases argued and determined in the Court of Appeals of Maryland” by Richard W. Gill, Maryland, Court of Appeals. Chancellor Hanson decreed that the said George French and Jacob Young do proceed to sell at public auction, either entire, or in such parcels as they shall judge most convenient, the lands conveyed to them in trust to be sold, by John D. Cary and William Cary and Robert T. Cary, by indenture executed on the 8th of August 1791. The sale of the said lands amounted to £1286 4 shillings 4 ½ pence current money. On 31 Oct 1795 it was ratified and confirmed. See 1803.

1795George French settled in the late 1790s in Allegany County, MD. For details, see http://www.msa.md.gov/megafile/msa/stagsere/se1/se5/000001/000001/000203/pdf/msa_se5_203.pdf

1795 George French (son) bought 25,059 ½ acres called “Bones Meadow” in Allegany County, Maryland, on 9 Aug 1790. This document contains 17 pages including a map.

By 28 Jul 1803, George French was deceased and Ariana French became his executrix. George French is mentioned in this case on 21 Apr 1803 in which he was still alive, as he died on 28 Apr 1803. George Scott’s name is also mentioned. The case goes back to 1789 and to 4 Jan 1794 when George French was still living; likewise on 14 Jan 1795; likewise on 14 Jan 1795; and the lands were sold for £1286.

The following lands belonged to George when he died.

Charles County:

- "Beauty", 110 acres;
- "Chance", 140 acres;
- "Choice", 76 acres;
- "Property", 148 acres;
- "Tit for Tat", 73 acres.

Anne Arundel County:

- "Blooming Plaines", 977 acres; 

Frederick County:

- "Wats Left", 24 acres;
- "Durham", 384 acres;
- "Rising Sun", 225 acres;
- "Vale", 913 acres;
- "Vale",  714 acres;
- "Tom’s Venture", 92 acres;
- "Homminy Isle", 101 acres.

1805 -- The Archives of Maryland, Volume 0607, Page 0101, Session Laws, in the year 1805 state the following regarding land deeds, Ariana French:
“Chance”, 140 acres
“Choice”, 76 acres property, 168 acres
“Tit for Tat”, 73 acres
“Blooming Plains”, 977 acres
“Durham”, 384 acres
“Rising Sun”, 225 acres”
“Tom’s Venture”, 92 acres
Homony Isle”, 101 acres

 

1805 -- The Archives of Maryland, Volume 553, Page 117, Journal of the House of Delegates in the year 1805 state the following:

1806 -- The Archives of Maryland, Volume 553, Page 101, Journal of the House of Delegates, Tuesday, January 21, 1806, state the following:

1805 -- 1805/07/23
1764: Ariana French vs. State of Maryland and James Clarke. AA, CH, FR. Title to Blooming Plains in AA. Also Beauty, Chance, Choice, Tit for Tat in CH. Also Durham, Rising Sun, Vale, Trus Venture, Homminy Isle, Georges Adventure in FR. Recorded (Chancery Record) 71, p. 340. 
Accession No.: 17,898-1764-1/4 MSA S512-2- 1842 Location: 1/36/1/

Death

George wrote his will on 12 Dec 1798, died between then and 28 Apr 1803, and Ariana French, his wife, approved his will on 23 Jul 1805. She died before 1811, intestate.

Ariana of Georgetown, was in an agreement with a tenant she had rented to, James McHenry, that he need to repair the 4-room house so that she could move in after the death of her husband.

In 1781 a law was passed which confiscated all British property, diverting it back to the State; however, James Clarke was entitled to said land on 3 Apr 1790 when he assigned it to George French; that is, his 384 acres called “Durham” and his 456 acres called “George’s Adventure” in Washington Co., MD. On 6 Jun 1803, George French’s will assigned it over to Ariana French, from Chancery Court Abstracts, Frederick County, Maryland. The will was executed by Ariana French. Website: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~midmdroots/county/frederick/chancery/1764.htm. The information given below of who was a minor is from the date the will was written on 12 Dec 1798, with notations added in 1811 when Ariana died intestate. Therefore, if a child was born after 1777, they were a minor, as were Catherine, Charles, and Robert.

Deciphering George’s Will

Trying to decipher the genealogy below is difficult; we are unsure about the hyphens and dots and what they mean, but here is our best attempt at deciphering it, assuming the main outline was written in 1798 and it was interpreted in 1811 (shown in parentheses below) when George’s children died along with George’s wife from smallpox. See the 1810-1811 epidemic of smallpox in Baltimore.

George French had died by 1803 after having written his will on 12 Dec 1798.

Ariana French, wife and executrix, proved his will on 23 Jul 1805.

George’s wife died by 1810 intestate, probably of the smallpox epidemic that year, and several of her children died also (Thomas, Catherine, Charles, and John Weems – husband of her daughter Elizabeth). See the 1810-1811 epidemic of smallpox in Baltimore.

Children of George and Ariana French:

Š      Thomas, deceased before 1811 but after his mother died probably in 1810, no issue.

Š      George, living in 1811 [b. 4 Sep 1781], m. Margaret H. Weems on 26 Nov 1807.

Š      Catherine, younger than 21 in 1798; therefore, b. after 1777, deceased before 1811 but after her mother died, no issue.

Š      Charles, younger than 21 in 1798; therefore, b. after 1777, died after his mother died but before 1811.

Š      Marianna, widow of Charles above, and her daughter Mary Virginia French, b. ca. 1804?

Š      Robert, b. 1792, younger than 21 in 1798; therefore, b. after 1777.

Š      Elizabeth, b. 1775 and not a minor, wife of John Weems who d. before 1811 in Montgomery Co., MD. John Weems was b. 1768, d. 1808.

Description: Ariana

1790 Census of Montgomery Co., Maryland, with 4 males under age 16, born after 1774, and 6 females of all ages, a family of 11.

1791 9/24/1791 Maryland Montgomery ONEIL Bernard Elizabeth Deed September 24, 1791-September 24, 1791 Folio 664  Bernard O'Neil to Joseph Watson part of tract called “Friendship” 8 1/4 a. Wit.: George French, Charles Magruder. Elizabeth O'Neil, wife of  Bernard O'Neil concurs Land Records Of Montgomery County, Maryland Liber D Sween Library, Rockville, Montgomery County, Maryland. [. . . that part of Friendship surveyed for Zachariah Magruder (son of Samuel Magruder, Jr., and Eleanor Wade), 145 acres, purchased from  (French, executor and devisee of George French of Georgetown in 1805.] [A devisee is a law that leaves real estate to someone by terms of a will.]   In 1793, George made a resurvey on part of “Friendship”, 533 ½ acres.

1798 George French son of Thomas wrote his will.

1800 April Ariana of Georgetown.

Description: Ariana5

Description: Ariana6

Description: Ariana7

Description: Ariana8

1803 Apr 28 Ariana French, executrix of George French, filed her petition to the Chancellor, stating that “by a degree, Jacob Young and George French, deceased, were appointed trustees to see the real estate of John, Robert, and William Cary, the real estate was sold, and that George French is since dead, and that she is his executrix. This is a long and detailed case which can be read at “Reports of cases argued and determined in the Court of Appeals of Maryland” by Richard W. Gill, Maryland, Court of Appeals.

Description: Ariana9

1805 Nov Sale of certain lands postponed. RESOLVED, That the executive of this state be directed to postpone the sale of the following tracts of land, claimed by a certain Ariana French, until the chancellor shall decide between the said Ariana French and the state of Maryland, to wit:  Chance, containing one hundred and forty acres; Choice, seventy-six acres; Property, one hundred and sixty-eight acres; Tit for Tat, seventy-three acres; Blooming Plains, nine hundred and seventy seven acres; Durham, three hundred and eighty-four acres; Rising Sun, two hundred and twenty-five acres; Tom's Venture, ninety-two acres, and Homony Isle, one hundred and one acres; provided the said Ariana French, her heirs or assigns, shall make application to the chancellor of this state, according to law, on or before the first day of November next.

1806 Jan 26 The above case resolved by the Senate. The resolution authorising congress to prevent the importation of slaves, and the resolution in favour of
Ariana French, were sent to the senate by the clerk.

By order, T. W. HALL, clk.
Which was read.
Mr. Stephen, from the committee, delivers to the speaker the following report: THE committee to whom was referred the petition of Ariana French, Catharine, Charles and Robert French, John Weems, and Elizabeth [French, dau. of George] his wife, of the district of Columbia, praying that the state may relinquish her legal right to certain lands therein mentioned, beg leave to report, that they have taken the same into their consideration, and after viewing all the circumstances submit the following resolution: 


1808 THE committee to whom was referred the petition of Ariana French, executrix and devisee of George
French, deceased, of the district of Columbia, praying that the state may relinquish her legal right to certain
lands therein mentioned, beg leave to report, that they have taken the same into consideration, and after viewing all the circumstances, submit the following resolution:

RESOLVED, That the state's right in and to the following tracts of land, viz. Chance, containing one hundred
and forty acres; Choice, containing seventy-six acres; Property, containing one hundred and sixty-eight acres;
Tit for Tat, containing seventy-three acres, situate in Charles county; Brooming Plains, containing nine hundred and seventy-seven acres; Durham, containing three hundred and eighty-four acres; Rising Sun, containing two hundred and twenty-five acres; Tom's Venture, containing ninety two acres; and Homony Isle, containing one hundred and one acres, be and the same is hereby relinquished unto the said Ariana French, (executrix and devisee of George French, deceased,) and her heirs and assign, for ever, reserving to all persons
concerned their legal and equitable interests.

Children of George French and Elizabeth Haynes, 1.3

2.3 Laney or Lenah French (female), b. 27 Jan 1777 in Washington Co., MD, where her father owned land at the time. She d. 29 Aug 1839 in Town Creek, Allegany Co., MD, and a Land Deed dated 5 Sep 1839 shows that both Laney and her husband William McLaughlin were deceased.

One of George French’s daughters, Laney, married William McLaughlin on 23 May 1799; she is listed in the marriage records of Allegany Co., MD, as Lucy French. They built a log house on the property of George French (see photos below). William McLaughlin later bought the property from George French in 1818 after fighting as a Captain in the War of 1814 and thereafter. The original Fort Cumberland is now in Allegany Co., MD. It was built in 1754.

William McLaughlin was b. in 1762, the son of William McLaughlin and Margaret Gow of Inverness, Scotland. The father William McLaughlin was buried at Yellow Creek Presbyterian Church Cemetery in Columbiana Co., OH.

Marriage

Laney m. 23 May 1799 to Captain William McLaughlin of Town Creek, Allegany Co., MD, in present day Hampshire Co., WV, about 10 miles south of Old Town. This is the same year in which Laney’s father had his second marriage, that to Jane Crabtree. They settled on Town Creek and had a total of 15 children. Note that George’s daughter, Laney, was of German descent, perhaps from her mother. The McLaughlin family was from Scotland and immigrated to New York ca. 1761. William McLaughlin’s parents were Daniel McLaughlin and Mary Key.

William McLaughlin was b. 23 Apr 1774 in Springfield, Hampshire Co., WV, d. ca. May 1830 in Town Creek, Allegany Co., MD. In his youth, William McLaughlin along with his brother Berriman would take flatboats down the Ohio River as far East as Louisville, KY. After their marriage, William and Lanie lived on 700 acres, mostly mountain, on Town Creek in Allegany Co. MD. It was only a few miles away from the old McLaughlin homestead across the West Virginia border. 
William was a captain in the War of 1812 and fought in the Battle of North Point, where he was wounded. He made several land purchases which are recorded in Cumberland, MD courthouse records:


April 1818, "Crabtrees Folly", 9 acres, $72

Aug. 1827, "Johnson's Adventure", 44.5 acres, $20

Sept. 1828, East Side of Town Creek, being part of "Crabtrees Folly"- from George French, $1

Mar 1830, "Sugar Camp", 40 acres plus several other parcels totaling $300

Sept. 1832, area around "Sugar Camp", $24.


After William's death, Laney and eight of the children are listed in 1835-1838 Methodist and Episcopal Church records in Flintstone and Town Creek.

The McLaughlin Log House is a very fine example of the log mansion style found in Allegany County. It had a very aesthetic location, being at the crest of a hill on the east side of a fresh running mountain stream named Town Creek. See details at http://www.msa.md.gov/megafile/msa/stagsere/se1/se5/000001/000001/000203/pdf/msa_se5_203.pdf

Oldtown, Allegany County, Maryland, and working on the C&O Canal.

Early Oldtown was a thriving little town. There were originally two saloons, a grocery store, an ice house, stables for rent, a shoe shop, a hat shop, a large tannery, and an arrow pointing to Fort Cumberland.

1815 Town Creek Methodist Church

The steeple of St. Francis Catholic church shows in the background. The original water vessels from St. Francis are displayed in the museum. The Catholic cemetery and the Methodist cemetery are still side-by-side on Oldtown Cemetery Road. In this photo you can also see the foundation of where the original lock house #70 stood. For details, see http://www.michaelcresapmuseum.org/oldtown.html.

Description: logcabin

Description: loghouse1 Description: loghouse2 Description: loghouse3

Photos of William and Laney French McLaughlin’s log house on George French’s land, photos taken in 1954 when owner Nellie Isaac had died. House is on Lower Town Creek Road SE, in Oldtown, Maryland 21555, just south of Pumpkin Center.

Description: loghouse5

William and Laney French McLaughlin had 14 children, all of whom they raised in their small log home: George French McLaughlin, Elizabeth, Daniel G., Joseph [photo below, b. ca. 24 Oct 1803], Mary, Laney, William H., Josiah or Isaiah, Washington, Disbury, Rosanna, Berriman, Emanuel, and Deborah.

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For details, see http://freepages.misc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~shopefamily/Tree/famf112.html.

 Description: loghouse4

“A” points to Pumpkin Center, and “B” points to the log house just south of it on Lower Town Creek Rd. SE. It is located at the crest of a hill on the east side of a fresh running mountain stream named Town Creek. William and Laney French McLaughlin raised all 14 children in their log home on Town Creek.

1828 Sep, William McLaughlin bought land at the East Side of Town Creek, Cumberland, Maryland, being part of “Crabtree’s Folly” from George French, $1. George French was Laney’s half brother.

War of 1812

Robert and William McLaughlin with General Hull, and when he surrendered. With Peter Wolfe, and many others of the “Noble Band”, they cut through the British rank and escaped. They were obliged to live on roots and barks with not other food for several days. William McLaughlin came round on the Eastern side of Lake Erie. Robert took a Violent fever and near where Erie City is, he could go no further. “He laid down to rise no more.” Just before he died he summoned his remaining strength and in a clear and beautiful voice he sang a part of the Hymn “Stoop down my thoughts that used to rise Converse a while with death - Think how a gasping mortal lies and pants awaq his breath.” Dunlap's Creek was the name of the town. Thus, in the wild wilderness on the Shores of Lake Eris, passed away one of the noblest, strongest and fleetest young men that Columbiana County has been able to claim as one of her sons. William came home to bear the sad tidings to the sorrowing “Home Family”. SOURCE: Excerpt of article "The McLaughlin Family in our Ancestral Line" by Samuel Sheehan 1809.

McLaughlin’s Company: Captain, Wm. McLaughlin; First Lieutenant, James Hook; Second Lieutenant, George Shuck; Ensign Frederick Rice; Sergeants, Robert Little, Frederick Deems, John Porter, James M. White, Jacob Waggoner; Corporals, Rezin Hook, Daniel Poland, John Walts, William Street, Joseph S. Stafford, John North; Frivates, John Busey, Benjamin Brown, James Bryan, David Bar, Nathaniel Barnes, Michael Bevins, Samuel Bands, Thomas Breeman, Nathaniel Bryan, William Broadwater, James Boyer, Charles Bussey, Elias Burrows, Martin Clabaugh, Bernard Connelly, Lewis Clemmer, David Cox, Samuel Chapman, John Creamer, Jocob Clark, Edward Connelly, Samuel Crawford, Isaiah Davis, Benjamin Deverbaugh, Michael Entler, Joseph Erb, Frederick Garey, Nicholas Gowar, Samuel Hoblitzell, George Hager, Jacob Isenhart, Thomas Jodwin, Benjamin Jolley, William Johnson, John Johnson, William Jolley, Robert R. Kennedy, James Kempton, David Kinsey, John Loatz, Benj. H. Lacey, Daniel Letters, George Loar, James Lee, Jocob Lee, Archibald Love, John Laughridge, Frederick Lee, James Morrow, John Martin, John McIntire, John Markee, Peter Myers, James Moore, George Miller, Abaham Michaels, Francis Mador, John Neff, Jr., M. Northcraft, Joseph Perrin, Joseph Paxton, William Paxton, Henry Porter, George Rice, Arjalon Resonor, Daniel Rhodes, John Russell, Frederick Rice, Elizophr Robinette, Thomas Riley, Jacob Sterner, Henry Shellborn, Moses Spencer, James Sherry, Peter Spillman, Jacob Saylor, Jacob Schoffer, John Shuck, Absalom Stoyer, Jacob Tumbuster, Jonathan Willson, Isaac Willson, Joshua Willson, Samuel White, Levi Whalley, Amos Willson, Jacob Zumbuly. Total in company 104.

The Adventures of the McLaughlin Brothers in 1795    

   

The following is a story written by William Gilbert Lafayette McLaughlin. He is the nephew of William and Berriman McLaughlin. Berriman is my 4th great grandfather. Although it is mostly about his brother William, I know Berriman was there and it gives me insight to his life before he became a husband and father -- in other words when he was a young, single, carefree man. This is what I love about genealogy -- learning what the people were like and what their lives were like. I hope you enjoy a sneak peek into 1795. I will take editorial license in shortening the story.

"Uncle William and Berriman after they became to years of maturity, [probably ca. 1795] went over to the Ohio River and engaged in flat boating as far down as Louisville, KY. In those days there were many hostile tribes of Indians, all along the river, there had to be army posts at intervals along the river to look for them.

Uncle William went first to work on flat boating; his boat stopped at the Indiana shore opposite Louisville near what is now Jeffersonville. There was an army post at that place; the Indians were making a good deal of trouble at that point. They had to send out scouts to watch them and keep the post advised as to their whereabouts. The flatboat was tied up at this point, and the hands had not much to do; they would go out and camp and spend time with the soldiers. The principal scout was Washburn a very fleet footed man. One day the officer in command ordered chief scout(Washburn) to go out and reconnoiter and find out the locality of the Indians. Washburn asked if anyone would volunteer to go with him, Uncle Wm told him he would go. So Washburn looked him over and says "Do you think you can run fast enough to get away from Indians if they should give us chase?" he says "I don't know but I am willing to try."

So they started out cautiously through the thick forest and underbrush until mid afternoon when suddenly they came upon Indians that started shooting at them. Washburn's powderhorn was hit and exploded. The two men ran even faster and soon Uncle William was passing Washburn. Uncle William was starting to fire his gun and Washburn told him not to as the Indians then would know his gun was not loaded and he would be a target. Washburn hid in the brushes and yelled at Uncle William to run back to the camp and get help. Washburn spent the night lying perfectly still to avoid being spotted by the Indians.

Uncle William got back to camp but they wouldn't believe his story. Finally the post sent a squad out to see, and it was led by Uncle William. He led them to the spot and they shot a few Indians and routed the rest. Washburn crawled out and he was hungry and thirsty. The soldiers had brought food and water and he ate at last. The boat crew bragged that they had a man that could run so fast no one could beat him. They wanted to entertain a bet but Uncle William wanted no part of it. Perhaps he knew motivation had to be there --- like running for your life?

In those days they had to get upstream by what was called a cordell. A strong cable was run upstream and made fast and the boat was pulled by a windlass on the bow of the boat and others would push with their pike poles if they could reach the bottom; this was slow traveling. Some would walk home. No steam boats in those days."

Berriman McLaughlin later married Catherine French and was the father of 11 children. He must have liked what he saw along the Ohio River as he later migrated to Scioto County. He served in the War of 1812.

William McLaughlin later married Laney French and was the father of 15 children. He never migrated from the Maryland and Virginia area where he was born. He served in the War of 1812.

Both were sons of Revolutionary patriot Daniel McLaughlin and Mary Key. From GenPatty.

Letters to Laney

Letters to Captain McLaughlin’s Wife during the War with the British in 1814 in Baltimore, Maryland

Letters from Captain William McLaughlin of Town Creek, Allegany County, Maryland to his wife, Laney (French) McLaughlin. Most written while he was at Baltimore during the war with the British in 1814. See the Battle of Baltimore. This war was fought between the British and American forces in the War of 1812. Photo below is of  “The Battle Monument” of Baltimore.

Information found in these letters:
Colonel Snavely is mentioned “who had known your father when he was a boy.” We assume this means Colonel Snavely had known George French when Colonel Snavely was a boy. This is a very big clue, as it
could mean that George French was first married to a Snavely, a German.

Hagerstown, August 10, 1814 


My Dear, I now set down to inform you of my situation. I arrived at the Big Spring last evening with the troops under my command. I was very unwell and continued so till I arrived in this plase which has since revived me being rec'd with so much friendship and 
respect by the ledr of this town that it has made me rite sound. I was met some distance out of town with a number of the town jentlemen with the drum and fife and convaid in to town and it appeard as if all the town was colected to the streat as we marched in to town. After I had dismist the troops I was convaid to the tavern with a number of jentlemen and among the rest was a Cornnal Snavely who had Known your father [he being George French, 1.3] when he was a boy. Every person new me as if I had lived in the town and among the rest was a very old jentleman who came and told me that history was being made. He requested that I would march the men to hear him and the next morning all the men under my command whitch intend to do him the honer. 
My Dear, Everything as yet is agreeable as the nature of the circumstances will admit of. I have the good will and confidence of the men which is a very agreeable thing. I had no ideay of the respect that has bin shown to our troops. But My Dear whenever I think of you and our Dear Little Children which is more than a thousand times a day bars I own all other satisfaction that I ever can see. Whilst from home I conclude with my kind love and Cinceare affection to you and all our little ones Laney McLaughlin. 

William McLaughlin 
this is don at a very late hour in the night. 






Undated
My Dear 
I take time to let you know that I send you this letter by Thomas Tatman.
he sais he will work for you. Thomas Godwinn said he will come and work. Thay say thay will get rails. You will set them at what you think best. I shall rite to you next Saturday. You will get a letter in Oldtown. You may look for a letter every Saturday. The reason you did not get the letter you mentioned in your letter I sent by privet hands but I shall not trust that again. I hope you will take time and be perticuler in riting to me all our little affairs and as for resigning my Commission, Clearly proven to be lvs, I fear and theare is several of my company gon home. They can tell how it was. I am with gratest respect your kind and loving husband until deth Mrs. McLaughlin. 

William McLaughlin 







Undated
My Dear, 
you did not understand me concerning my situation in camp. It tis that I was in the Brigade when I came in to camp but when My field officers found that I was fiter (or fitten) and atentif to my duty they tuck a liking to me and put me in the right of the first regiment. I have the good will of the generil and _______ that I own as well as my own men. My men is well and all in big spirits. It's (a) grate satisfaction to have the good will of the men I beleave would loose theare lives for me. I expect to be heare some time. You, I hope will rite as offin as you can. Thare shall be nothing lacking in my part to give you all the affection that I can. Let your father and my father now that I am well. My Dear, I hope to see you all again when I get a onourable discharge. I am, with true affection, your loving husband Laney McLaughlin. 

Wm. McLaughlin 
Let me now how the old mare is. 





Baltimore, August tuesday 30 - 1814 

My Dear, 
I take this opportunity to let you know that I am well hoping these few lines will find you all well. I am now stationed at Baltimore and I expect I shall stay heare some time and if you can rite to me I can git it hear if we are not compeld to leave it. The inglish is expected hear every day but if thay stay away a yr longer we shall be able to stand a large force if thay will fight. There is grate preperation making and the forces is coming very fast in 3 days more we shall have twenty thousand men at this plase. We are intrenching all around the town. My Dear I would be very glad to hear from you and the little ones. When this comes to hand I wish ...................................... not no how you would rite to me But I think I shall be hear till you Can rite to me. I hope you will rite to me just as you are- 

(Can't make out the rest of this letter) 





Hampstead Hill, near Baltimore Sept. 3 - 1814 

My Dear, 
I take this opertunity to let you know that I am well. Hoping these few lines find you and all the rest of the little ones well. I have nothinq to rite more than I did the first inst. more than I find that I have a chance of being discharged in this way. There is seventeen captains to the regiment that I belong to and only ten is wanting therefore seven is to be Discharged and if I get my discharge I shall soon be at home.' It the result is to be announced today. I will rite to you as soon as it tis determined. I wish you would rite to me stating how you all are. The sitties of Washington and Georgetown and Alexandria is all giving up to the British and they are to Breakfast tomorrow morning in Baltimore But I do not think thay will get it as easy as thay did the sitty of Washington. I am with respect your affectienate husband. 

Wm. McLaughlin
I give you all my kind love Laney McLaughlin. 
Hampstead Hill Near Baltimore Sept. 10 – 1814.


My Dear 
I take this oppertunity to inform you that I am well. Hoping these few lines will find you all well. My Dear I rec'd vour letter of the ___ of Sept. which was the first I have heard from you since I seen you Which gave me more satisfaction than I can express to you on paper. Thare has nothing pertcular happened since I rote to you. The English has past our forts on the Potomac and are bearing towards Norfork in Virginia and I beleave part of the army will be discharged. I have rote to you that I had a chance of being discharged, But I find I have no chance of that. Yesterday our incampment was changed and I was permoted to the right of the Brigade and the generil told me that I should not be Discharged while there was a Militia Capt. wanting but I beleave that I willbe discharge at the end of the month from the time I left home. I told you I have heard nothing from you but I rec'd a letter from my father a few days agoe which informed me that you were all well and told me he had bin to see you and that Daniel had hald in the grane and was about assisting you to cut the grass. My Dear I hope you will (write) to me how you are be candid about it as I am with you. I shall be heare perhaps til I am discharged. You may (write) to me as offen as you wish and I hope that will be every weake. My Dear I send you ten dollars by Mr. Benjamin Roberson in flintstone to do with as you think best. You need not be uneasy about sending you money because I can git anything I want whether I have money or not-- My Dear you will receive a letter from me on this day weake. By the past _____ I shall rite to you. I am your affectionate husband untill deth. Give my love to our little ones and your father. 

Wm. McLaughlin 








Baltimore Sept. 15 - 1814 

My Dear 
I take this opertunity to let you know of me. When I rote to you last Sunday we were in confusion and have bin so til Now. Sunday the British hove in sight and landed there men about 12 miles from this plase. There was about five thousand men sent out to meet them. the most of them was out of the sitty of Baltimore. On Monday theay had a battle But our men soon gave way. We lost about twenty men and severil wounded and thay was brot in last night and are Burying the ded today. On Monday thay begun to fire the town and continued theare with theare cannon and Bumshells till sometime a Wednesday from theare ships. Thay have gone a little farther off but thay lay in sight. on tuseday morning I was sent out with three hundred and four to watch the inimy. I have returned safe. the inimy have retreated back towards there vessels. I and the men (turn over) under my command lay in about half a mile of the inimy last tuseday night. I am right well onley all most wore out for the fatigue has been so hard on me that I am almost worn out. I have not puld one stitch of my close since Saturday Night. My Dear I must conclude with my kind love to you and our dear little children. I am your most affectionate husband till deth. Wm. McLaughlin 
I have sent you ten dollars by Mr. Benjamen Roberson in flintstone. Give my love to all of our friends. 





Baltimore the 26 - Sept. 1814

My Dear 
I take this oppertunity to let you (know) that I am well as ever. I was in my life if I was not so much fatigued for the want of sleep. I can't rest of night. I hope My Dear these few lines will find you and our dear little children all well. My Dear I received two letters from you on the 26 just one was dated the 12 and the other was dated the 19 day of the same_______ witch gave me grate satisfaction to heare from You. I never can make you ____ible of the satisfaction it gave me til I see you for witch I have (k)now want of in my thought but I shall see you all agane. My Dear I have suffered of a grate deal of fatigue since I seen you but if I can onely get home to you agane I shall be satisfied because I (k)now I shall do Justis to my contry as far as I can. My Dear I expect you have heard that I was wound(ed) by this time. I can tell you that I am all most well again I do my Duty as well as I ever did. I never had a wound to heal so soon as it has. I hope you will give yourself no uneasyness concerning it. My Dear with the wound and fatigue I felt so bad when Mr. Robersone left here I was unwilling to let him (k)now anything about it. My Dear you______ wish concerning our ant. I have made all the inquiries I could. Daniel is ded and nothing can be don. till I come home you need not give yourself no uneasiness concerning it till you see me as I shall leave nothing undon that I can do. My Dear I wish you would rite me as soon as you can concerning yourself and the little children and concerning the warrent that was to be laid. My Dear I send you ten dollars for the use of yourself and little ones in remembrance of me I hope you will lay it out as you think Best. I shall rite to you Every Weake. Let me (k)now a thing you wish. Don't be backward in a thing you wish. I am your Cincere love until deth. 
William McLaughlin
Give my kind love to our children. 





Headquarters Balt. 3 Oct. 1814 

Genl. Orders 

The commanding Genl. learns with great regret that many outrages have been committed by the soldiers on the property of individuals about the camp in robbing of Henroosts and digging of Potatoes, carrying off apples, destroying of fences, and other petty larcenies disgraceful to those assembled for the protection of the city and defence of the liberty of our country. To prevent any future depredations of this sort it is enjoined on the commanding officers of divisions, Brigades and Separate Corps to establish strong guards about their respective camps and prevent any soldiers from passing out of the camp after sundown without a written permission from his commanding officer any soldier or individual belonging to the army found guilty of such disgraceful practice shall be immediately arrested and punished as the rules and regulations governing the armies of the U.S. have expressly directed for such offences. 






By command of 
Major Gnl. Smith
(signed) Wm. Baty apt. adj. Genl
D.M.M. 

Battle of North Point in the War of 1812 (September 12-14, 1814)

After the invasion and burning of Washington, D.C. in August 1814, Rear Admiral George Cockburn reloaded the British troops of Major General Robert Ross to prepare for seizing Baltimore, a chief privateering nest in the United States. The location of Baltimore made it necessary to defend the city from both land and sea attack. Major General Samuel Smith was placed at the head of the city's defenses. The Baltimore harbor defenses rested on Fort McHenry. On September 11, 1814, the British fleet appeared off North Point in Baltimore County. The British strategy was to approach the city from the North Point and enter Baltimore by way of Hampstead Hill, now known as Baltimore's Patterson Park. 
The attacks by land and water would be simultaneous.

Smith ordered General John Stricker's 3rd Brigade of about 3,200 militia down the North Point Road to the narrow neck of the peninsula. A stronger fortified line ran along Hampstead Hill. Stricker intended to execute a delaying action along North Point Road before withdrawing into Hampstead Hill's fortifications.

On the morning of September 12, Major General Ross' troops advanced slowly yet confidently up North Point Road. Ross predicted that the American militia would run when fired upon and initially they did pull back. However, significantly a major casuality was Gen. Ross. Legend has it that two sharpshooters, Daniel Wells and Henry McComas, made Ross their target. Whether they actually fired the shots will never be known. The boys fell almost immediately to British bullets. A monument immortalizes their valiantry. Carried to the rear, Ross died a few hours later.

The British forces advanced and that afternoon, Colonel Arthur Brooke, Ross' second in command, charged. The center and right wing of Stricker's line held before retreating to the reserve units a mile behind the lines. Stricker than moved his forces to the fortification on Hampstead Hill to reorganize.
Colonel Brooke, lacking confidence in his new position, halted his troops. The British fleet, commanded by Vice Admiral Sir Alexander Cochrane, maneuvered into the Patapsco River in preparation for the attack on Fort McHenry. While the fleet fired on Fort McHenry during the day, Colonel Brooke prepared for a night assault on Hampstead Hill. Brooke was again certain that the militia would flee. Later that night he cancelled the plan upon seeing the fortification. Admiral Cockrane's fleet would need to subdue Fort McHenry before they could help the land forces take the Hill. The tactic failed. The dawn of September 14, immortalized in our National Anthem, showed the success of the American defense. September 12 continues to be celebrated as a Maryland legal holiday, Maryland Defender's Day. An annual reenactment of the battle takes place at Fort Howard Park, Edgemere, MD.

Source: Neal A. Brooks and Eric G. Rockel. A History of Baltimore County. Friends of the Towson Library, Inc. Towson, MD. 1979.

Death

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Will of William McLaughlin, 22 Jan 1844: George F. McLaughlin, Elizabeth McLaughlin, Daniel McLaughlin, Joseph McLaughlin, Mary McLaughlin, Laney McLaughlin, William McLaughlin, Isaiah McLaughlin, Rosannah McLaughlin, Benjamin McLaughlin, Emmanuel McLaughlin, and Deborah McLaughlin are the legal heirs of William McLaughlin of Allegany Co., MD.

2.4 Phoebe/Phebe French, b. 10 Mar 1814, d. 2 Jan 1894 in Old Town, Allegany Co., MD, m. Lewis Gilbert Shryock on 8 Dec 1829 of Old Town, Allegany Co., MD, when she was only 15. She lived her entire life in Allegany Co., MD and is listed in the 1840, 1850, 1860, 1870, and 1880 census records there. They had 12 children. The 1880 census shows that Phebe Shryock is widowed, age 66, living with her son Henry Shryock and his family. Lewis G. Shryock was b. 1806 and d. 1874. Among their children buried at the Shryock Cemetery in Pumpkin Center, Allegany Co., MD, are: George F. Shryock (1831-1875), Henry R. Shryock (1833-1910), L. Martin Shryock (1840-1920). This 1880 census states that both of Phebe’s parents were born in Maryland, and that even at age 66, the census states she is a farmer.

Third Generation

Children George French and Ariana Scott, 2.2

Note that this Ariana French is not the same one as the Ariana French who was the wife of  French in the first generation. That one was Ariana Bankson and this one was Ariana Scott. No George is listed in the 1800 census below.

1800, Ariana Scott French is listed in the 1800 census of Georgetown, Washington D.C. living with:

2 white males ages 10-15, b. 1785-1790, Robert and Charles
2 white males ages 16-26, b. 1774-1784, George and Thomas
1 white female age 10-15, b. 1785-1790, Catherine
1 white female age 26-44, b. 1756 or after, Ariana Scott French
and 13 slaves, a total of 19.

13 slaves, a total of 19. The 13 slaves were far more than any woman had at that time. She was living next door to John Weems who was the husband of Elizabeth French (daughter of George French), b. 1775, d. before 1811 in Montgomery Co., MD. John Weems was b. 1768, d. 1808.

3.1 Elizabeth French, b. 1775 in Georgetown, Washington, WDC, m. Dr. John Weems on 14 Mar 1797 in Georgetown, WDC. Elizabeth was therefore not listed living with her parents in the 1800 census above as she was married. Dr. John Weems was b. 1768, d. 1811 along with a great portion of the French family of smallpox, making his will on 12 Dec 1794. They had son George French Weems (named after his grandfather) 1798-1870, Rollo Weems 1797-1823, and John Weems 1800-1860. John died 2 Dec 1811 in Montgomery County, Maryland. He was buried at the Bowie Family Cemetery in Bowie, Prince George’s County, Maryland. The 1803 Agreement also states that John Weems died in 1811. See the 1810-1811 epidemic of smallpox in Baltimore. The cemetery is located at what was Cedar Hill Plantation and sits on private property near Holy Trinity Church on Annapolis Road, Bowie, Maryland. John Weems was the son of William Loch Weems and Amelia Chapman, both b. ca. 1735. John Weems’ will follows, dated 11 Dec 1794, 3 years before his son John Weems married Elizabeth French:

 

In the Name of God, Amen.

I John Weems of Ann Arundel County in the state of Maryland considering the uncertainty of life and possessing at present a sound mind, memory, and understanding, though afflicted in my Body with severe illness, being desirous of settling my worldly affairs do hereby make and publish this my last will and testament in the following manner and form VIZ:

 

Imprimis, I give and devise all my now dwelling plantation being part of Portland Manor to my son William Weems and his heirs forever.

 

2nd It is my Will and direction that my Executors herein named shall sell and dispose to the best advantage all my part of a tract called Lordship's Bounty containing one hundred and one acres.  Also all my part of three other tracts called Burrage, Burrage's Blossom, and Burrage's End containing two hundred acres.  Also all my other tracts and parcels of land now in my possession on Herring Creek to be sold as above and I do hereby fully authorize and empower them so to do and the money arising from this sale thereof to be applied to the payment of my just debts.

 

3rd I give and bequeath to my Sons John Beale Weems and William Weems and to my daughter Elizabeth Weems all my property of whatsoever kind it may be which shall be on the plantation late the property of Mrs. Ann Beall at the time of my decease except a Negroe woman hereinafter named to be equally divided between my three children.  I further give to my daughter Elizabeth one Negroe girl named Poll.  Also one silver tea chest, one silver salver, one silver tea pott, six silver tea spoons and six silver table spoons to be equally divided between my daughters Elizabeth Weems and Ann Weems.

 

4th I further give to my daughter Ann Weems the choice of Fifteen Negroes also one Negro woman named Hagar independent of her equal division.

 

5th After payment of my just debts and legacies and deducting my wife's  third part of the estate, I will and direct that the residue and remainder of my property of every kind and denomination whatever be equally divided between my sons John Beale Weems and William Weems and the heirs of my daughter Sarah Johns, my daughter Mary McPherson, Elizabeth Weems, and Ann Weems, but as two of my said daughters, Viz, Sarah Johns and Mary McPherson have already had and received of me sundry Negroes to the number of 30 and upwards, it is my will mind and direction that they, the said Sarah Johns and Mary McPherson shall account accordingly to a Just and fair estimate to be made for the value of all such Negroes by them respectively received which value shall be taken and considered as part of their distributive share of my Estate herein to them bequeathed.

 

Lastly, I constitute and appoint my loving wife Mary Weems and friends John Hall of the Vineyard and Alexander McPherson executors of this my last will and testament hereby revoking annulling and making void all other wills and testaments by me heretofore made.  I hereunto set my hand and affix my seal this twenty eighth day of November one thousand seven hundred and ninety four.

 

John Weems

 

Witnesses

Edward Hall

Mordicai Hall

Henry Hall

 

Anne Arundel County 11th day of December 1794.  Then came Henry Hall one of the subscribing witnesses to the within last will and testament of John Weems late of Anne Arundel County deceased and made oath on the holy Evangels of Almighty God that he did see the Testator therein named sign and seal this will and that he heard him publish, pronounce and declare the same to be his list Will and Testament, etc.

 

Edward Hall, ditto 12 Dec 1794.

 

Mordicai Hall 13 Dec 1794 ditto

 

J. Hall renounces his appointment as executor due to infirm health. 12 Dec 1794

 

Source:

Maryland State Archives

Annapolis MD

Anne Arundel County Wills Box W Folder 63

Transcribed by Anne Scrivener Agee 18 March 2000

Elizabeth d. 13 Oct 1839 at the residence of Maria French in Georgetown, outside WDC. Maria C. French was b. 18 Jul 1795 and d. 7 Mar 1887 and is buried at the Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, WDC. Most likely she was the widow of Elizabeth’s brother Charles.

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William Loch Weems was b. ca. 1735 at Billingsley Plantation, Upper Marlboro, Anne Arundel Co., MD, and d. 1783 at the Billingsley Plantation. He m. Amelia Chapman in 1758; Amelia was the dau. of Nathaniel Chapman and Constantia Pearson. They had 7 children:

- Nathaniel Chapman Weems; b. 1760; d. Feb or Mar 13, 1808, m. Violetta Van Horn, on Dec 8, 1790. Violetta was the daughter of Philip Van Horn and Elizabeth Ricketts. Nathaniel and Violetta had 7 children.

- William Loch Weems, II.

- John Weems, II, became a Medical Doctor, b. 1768, m. Elizabeth French, d. 1811.

- James Loch Weems, III

- (daughter) Weems, m. Mr. ___? Mackall

- (daughter) Weems, m. Mr. ___? Hollyday, m. Mr. ___? Summerville

- (daughter) Weems

For more on the Weems family, see http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/a/g/e/Anne-S-Agee/BOOK-0001/0005-0006.html. Elizabeth Weems and her son George French Weems are mentioned in the will of Margaret Scott, sister to Ariana Scott French, on 8 Jul 1799, probated 14 May 1806.

Found the will. DC Probate Records.

The will of Margaret Scott of Georgetown 8 July 1799 probated 14 May 1806

Brother Andrew

Sister Ann Boyd and her daughter Elizabeth Boyd

Nephew George French [see 3.4]

Sister Ariana French and her six children [see 2.2]

Elizabeth Weems and her son George French Weems [see 3.1]

Exec George French and Isabella Scott

Margaret, Ariana, Ann and Isabelle are all named in George Scott’s 1771 will as his daughters.

3.2 Thomas French, b. 1776, (1774-1784 according to the 1800 census), but in his father’s will, he was not a minor, suggesting he was born before 1777. He died between 23 Jul 1805 when his father’s will was probated and before 1811, intestate, no issue, which must be that he died between the time the 1810 census was taken and sometime in 1811. See the 1810-1811 epidemic of smallpox in Baltimore. He is listed in the 1810 census of Boonsborough, Washington Co., MD, the only one in the household, with 10 slaves whom he inherited from his Aunt Ariana when she died ca. 1810.

3.3 Catherine French, b. 26 May 1778. However, the 1800 census of Georgetown, WDC, lists her as b. between 1785-1790. She was listed as a minor in the 1805 agreement; therefore, born after 1777. She d. 16 Sep 1850 in Winchester, Scott Co., IL, at age 72, and was buried in Baker Cemetery, Winchester, Scott Co., IL. She m. Berriman McLaughlin, brother of William McLaughlin whom her cousin Laney married, in Aug 1796 in Allegany Co, Maryland or Hampshire Co, VA. The marriage of these two brothers also proves the connection of these two French family members. Berriman and Catherine had 11 children: Daniel, John, William, Isaac, Mary, Elizabeth, Vianner, Sarah, Susan, Catherine, and Josephus all in Nottingham township, Tuscarawas Co., OH. Berriman McLaughlin was b. 23 Mar 1776 in South Branch of the Potomac River, River Farm, Hampshire, VA, now WV. He d. 8 Apr 1850, just 6 months before Catherine, in Jefferson Co., IN, at age 74. That is why he is not listed in the 1850 census.

Catherine French was still alive in 1850 when the census taker arrived where she was staying at the home of Hiram and Vianner Holliday’s house. Catherine was living with her daughter, Vianner McLaughlin, who married Hiram Holliday in Ohio.

Catherine Perrin, thought to have married Benjamin McLaughlin. The McLaughlin possibility seems real. In the McLaughlin family history William Gilbert Lafayette McLaughlin wrote in 1909 that Berriman McLaughlin, brother of the William McLaughlin, married a Perrin. The current author of this history disagreed, averring that Berriman married Caroline French. However, the same author stated that her tombstone in Greene County, Illinois says “Catherine”. In the 1850 census, Greene County, IL, in the Hiram Holiday household (he being Berriman's son-in-law) there is an entry for Catharine McLaughlin, age 73, born in Pennsylvania. I would like to consider the possibility that Catherine Perrin was Berriman's second wife [2].

3.4* George French, b. 4 Sep 1781 in Georgetown, Washington DC. The 1800 census of Georgetown, WDC, list George as b. 1774-1784. The 1805 Agreement Case does not indicate he was a minor then, so this research coincides. He d. 7 Dec 1834 in Georgetown, WDC, and is buried at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, WDC. His remains were removed from the Presbyterian Cemetery on 7 May 1874.

Marriage

George m. Margaret Hall Weems on 26 Nov 1807 in Prince George’s County, MD, where he owned land. She was b. 11 Dec 1788 in Prince George’s County, MD, and d. 8 Jul 1809 in Prince George’s County, MD. She was buried at the Bowie Family Cemetery Cedar Hill, in Prince George’s Co., MD. See http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/a/g/e/Anne-S-Agee/BOOK-0001/0005-0016.html. This website indicates that George was the son of George French and Ariana Scott. This has not been verified.

They had daughter Margaret H. W. French on 3 Jun 1809, she m. Robert Bowie who was b. 4 Apr 1804 and d. 1 Apr 1881 and is buried at the Bowie Family Cemetery in Bowie, Prince George’s Co., MD), and d. 20 Apr 1847. One could see that George’s wife Margaret died from childbirth complications, dying only 1 month after their daughter was born. However, George had a daughter named Susan born on 8 Jul 1812; therefore, he could have had a second marriage.

Death

George was buried 7 Dec 1834 most likely in Georgetown, WDC. The remains were removed from the Presbyterian Cemetery on May 7, 1874. Also buried here was Susan B. French, b. 8 Jul 1812, d. Dec 11, 1896, age 84, buried in WDC (or Georgetown), daughter of Robert French, which proves that they are all related as their names appear on this one stone. There are over 17,412 interments at this cemetery, 29 of them are French. See http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gsr&GSiman=1&GScid=104443&GSfn=&GSln=French.

The 4 sides of this stone show:

1.    George and Susan French

2.    Robert and Jonathan (John) B. French

3.    Maria C. French

4.    unknown

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3.5 Charles French, b. 1785-1790, a minor on 12 Dec 1798 when his father’s will was written, and died between 23 Jul 1805 when his father’s will was probated and 1811 when his mother died, with issue. Charles is listed in the 1800 census of Georgetown, WDC, as born 1785-1790. His widow was Marianna, and their daughter (by Marianna’s first marriage) was Mary Virginia French, and they are mentioned in the will of Charles’ father. Charles and his brothers George and Robert (both of whom were presumably were not married at the time of their father’s death) were the only children who received an inheritance.

Charles m. Marianne Clark Murdock (or Mary Anna Craik Clarke) 12 Dec 1809 in Prince George’s County, Maryland. She was b. ca. 1790, the daughter of Dr. David Clark and widow of Addison Murdock. She d. before 3 Apr 1849 in WDC. She had a marriage prior to marrying Charles, and that was on 13 Apr 1805 to Addison Murdock in Prince George’s County, Maryland, and they had 2 children: Mary Virginia Murdock and William Murdock. Marianna could have been the connection to the French family’s contacts with the Clark family; however, her father was David Clark, not James Clarke. George French sold much of his land to James Clarke.

The following description is from “Across the Years in Prince George’s County [Maryland], Some County and Allied Families” by Effie Gwynn Bowie, 1975.

Description: MarianneClark1

Description: MarianneClark2

3.6* Robert French, b. 1792 in PA, a minor on 12 Dec 1798 when his father’s will was written. He spent most of his life in Allegany Co., MD. Robert is listed in the 1800 census of Georgetown, WDC, as born 1785-1790.

Marriages

Robert m1. ______Gautier ca. 1811.

Robert French m2. Helen Dickson on 25 May 1824 and had 6 children. Helen was b. 17 Feb 1799, d. 13 Aug 1835. Robert died between 1860-1870 as he appears in the 1860 census. They were members of the Saint Peter’s Protestant Episcopal Church in Baltimore, Baltimore Co., MD. Another researcher states that Robert died on 13 Aug 1835 when his son Samuel Gautier French was born. Their 6 children were Robert Summerfield French, Thomas Gautier French (of Orange, NJ), George French, Helen French, Elizabeth Gautier French, and Samuel Gautier French.

Census Records

1820 census of Allegany Co., MD
1 male under 10, b. 1810-1820
1 male 10-15, b. 1805-1810
1 male 16-25
1 male 26-44, b. 1776-1794, Robert, b. 1792
1 male 45+, perhaps his wife’s father
3 females under 10, b. 1810-1820, Phoebe b. 1814
1 female 16-25
1 female 26-44

1830 census of Allegany Co., MD
1 male under 5, Robert, b. 1829
2 males 5-9, John, b. 1822
3 males 20-29
1 male 40-49, b. 1781-1790, Robert, b. 1792
1 male 70-79, perhaps his wife’s father
2 females under 5
1 female 5-9
1 female 10-14, Susan, b. 1812
1 female 15-19, Phoebe, b. 1814
1 female 30-39

1850 census of Allegany co., MD, age 58, shows Robert living with the Glass family. His daughter Phebe married Jonathan Glass.

1860 census of Allegany Co., MD, age 70, Robert is living with Malinda Schrock (or Shryock) age 25, b. 1835, and John Fike age 75. Robert must have died between 1860-1870.

1870 census of Allegany Co., MD, Jonathan Glass is 60, Phebe Glass is 56, and their children Margaret Glass (17), Huldah (16), and Amanda (14).

Fourth Generation

Children of George French and Margaret Weems, 3.4

4.1 Margaret H. W. (Hall Weems) French, b. 3 Jun 1809 in Washington Co., MD, she m. Robert Bowie on 2 Feb 1826 in Prince George’s Co., MD. He was b. 4 Apr 1804 In Queen Anne, Prince George’s Co., MD and d. 1 Apr 1881 and is buried at the Bowie Family Cemetery in Bowie, Prince George’s Co., MD. Margaret d. 20 Apr 1847 in Prince George’s Co., MD, and is buried at Cedar Hill. One could see that George’s wife Margaret Weems died from childbirth complications, dying only 1 month after their daughter was born.

Children of Robert French and Gautier, 3.6

4.2 Susan B. French, b. 8 Jul 1812 in Allegany Co., MD, d. 11 Dec 1896 at age 84 and is buried at Oak Hill Cemetery, Georgetown, Washington, WDC. The Washington Post December 14, 1896 - French. On Friday, December 11, 1896, Susan B. French, formerly of Georgetown, D.C. aged seventy-five years.

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4.3 Phoebe French, b. 1814 in Allegany Co., MD, m. Jonathan Glass, and lived in the 1870 census of Allegany Co., MD. In the 1840 census, Jonathan was living in Selbysport, Allegany Co., MD with a family of 4: 1 male under 5, 1 male 20-29 (Jonathan), 1 female under 5, 1 female 20-29 (Phoebe). In the 1850 census of this family (same location), her father Robert French shows up, age 58, b. 1792 in NJ. In the 1860 census (same location), Phoebe is 46 and Robert French is no longer living with them: Jonathan Glass (49), Phoebe Glass (46), and their children who were one son and 8 daughters, two sets who appear to be twins: Robert Glass (16), Louisa Glass (14), Mary Glass (14), Clarissa Glass (12), Isabella Glass (11), Phoebe Glass (10), Margaret Glass (8), Hulda Glass (8), Amanda Glass (5). 1870 census of Allegany Co., MD, Jonathan Glass is 60, Phebe Glass is 56, and their children Margaret Glass (17), Huldah Glass (16), and Amanda Glass (14).

Children of Robert French and Helen Dickson, 3.6

4.4* Robert Summerfield French, b. ca. 1829 in Baltimore, MD. Sarah A. Hobb was b. 1830 in England. She m1. Evans, m2. Robert S. French on 13 Nov 1851 at age 24 in Knox Co., OH. They had children: Harris H. French (1853), Helen G. French (1856-1870), Gautier French (1859-1870), and Elsie French (1865-1938) per census records.

Robert d. 17 Jun 1833 [should this be 1883], and Sarah A. died 10 Apr 1902. On the other side of the stone are their children. They are buried at the Kenyon College Cemetery in Gamblier, Knox Co., OH. The record for this gravestone states that Robert d. 17 Jun 1883, but the stone does not indicate that.

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4.5* Thomas Gautier French, chr. 4 Jul 1830 at Saint Peter’s Protestant Episcopal Church in Baltimore, Baltimore Co., MD [21]. He d. 15 May 1875 in East Orange, Essex Co., NJ, m. Annette Tingley Shepard in Sep 1852. Annette was b. ca. 1830 in Rhode Island and d. 15 May 1875 in East Orange, Essex Co., NJ. Thomas was listed in the Bible Records of Thomas French, 1st Generation.

In O'Brien County, Iowa Deed Book S, p. 509 is an affidavit dated Sept. 19, 1885 that states:

Samuel G. French, d. Feb. 20, 1882, left a Will proved in Union Co., Oregon, a copy in Souix Co., Iowa

He owned land in O’Brien Co., Iowa

HEIRS:

Sister: Elizabeth G. Hibbler, of No. 51, West 25th St., NY City

Brother: Robert S. French, d. June 1883, leaving widow, Sarah Ann and children: Elise G. and Harris G. French

Sister-in-law: Annette T. French, widow of his dec'd brother, Thomas G. French and thomas' children: Helen G. Warren, Annette G. French, and Chauncy S. French.

In the 1850 census of Orange, Essex Co., NJ.

In the 1860 census of East Orange, Essex Co., NJ, Thomas was 30 years old, Annette was also 30, daughter Helen E. was 6, son Chauncey S. was 5, and daughter Annetta F. was 1. Thomas died only 15 years later.

In the 1870 census of Orange, Essex Co., NJ, Thomas was 40 and living with his wife and 3 children. Thomas died 5 years later.

4.6 Malinda or Miranda French, b. 1832 in Allegany Co., MD, m. George F. Schrock or Shryock most likely before 1850 as she is not in the census with her siblings. He was b. 1831 and d. 1875, and they had dau. Alice C. Shryock, 1860-1881. The family is buried at the Shryock Cemetery near Pumpkin Center in Allegany Co., MD. Miranda d. 1910.

Census

1860 census of Allegany Co., MD, age 70, Robert, her father, is living with Malinda Schrock (or Shryock) age 25, b. 1835, and John Fike age 75. Robert must have died between 1860-1870.

1880 Miranda Shryock living alone in Allegany Co., MD, widowed, living with her children: Comlin Shryock 23, Alley A. Shryock 19, Pola Shryock 11. She states that both her parents were born in Maryland.

1900 Oldtown, Allegany Co., MD, Miranda is listed as age 60, b. May 1831, widowed, both parents born in Maryland, living with several of her children and also Daniel B. McLaughlin, age 48, b. 1852, a relative beginning with the 3rd generation of this web page. Daniel B. McLaughlin was the brother of Sunda F. Shysock, age 44, who is the head of the household and also the daughter of Miranda Shysock, age 60.

4.7 George French, b. 1838, d. 2 May 1843 at 5 years of age, buried at the Green Mount Cemetery in Baltimore, MD.

4.8 Elizabeth Gautier French, b. 1834 in MD, in the 1850 census of Orange, Essex Co., NJ. She m. Hibbler of No. 51, West 25th St., NY City.

4.9 Samuel Gautier French, b. 7 Dec 1835 in Baltimore, Baltimore Co., MD, d. 20 Feb 1882 in East Orange, NJ. He appears in the 1850 census of Orange, Essex Co., NJ, living with his mother, Ellen (should be Helen) who was 50 years old or b. ca. 1800, and his brother Thomas who was 20 or b. in 1830, and his sister Elizabeth who was b. in 1834.

In O'Brien County, Iowa Deed Book S, p. 509 is an affidavit dated Sept. 19, 1885 that states:

Samuel G. French, d. Feb. 20, 1882, left a Will proved in Union Co., Oregon, a copy in Souix Co., Iowa

He owned land in O’Brien Co., Iowa

HEIRS:

Sister: Elizabeth G. Hibbler, of No. 51, West 25th St., NY City

Brother: Robert S. French, d. June 1883, leaving widow, Sarah Ann and children: Elise G. and Harris G. French

Sister-in-law: Annette T. French, widow of his dec'd brother, Thomas G. French and thomas' children: Helen G. Warren, Annette G. French, and Chauncy S. French.

Fifth Generation

Children of Robert Summerfield French and Sarah A. Hobb, 4.4

5.1* Harris Hanna French (listed in the Bible Records of Thomas French) of Memphis, TN. He was b. 2 Jul 1853 in College twp., Knox Co., OH. He m1. unk who died before 1880, m2. Adelaide R. in 1882.

Census

He lived with his parents, Robert and Sarah A. French, in the 1860 census of Gambier, Knox Co., OH. In the 1870 census, he was living in Mount Pleasant, Racine Co., WI, age 17, probably in a boarding house with various other people. In the 1880 census of College, Knox Co., OH, age 27, he was a widower, stating his father was born in NY and his mother in England. He was a druggist and sundries. In the 1900 census of Cove, Union Co., OR, he states he m2. in 1882 to Adelaide R. and that his father was born in NY and his mother in England. They have 3 children: Harris F. French, Robert S. French, and Stuart G. French. He died on 19 May 1903, age 49, in Cove, Union Co., OR. Adelaide’s parents were both born in Ireland.

5.2 Evan French, d. at age 3.

5.3 Helen Gautier French, b. 1856 in College twp., Knox Co., OH, she lived with her parents, Robert and Sarah A. French, in the 1860 census of Gambier, Knox Co., OH. She died at 6 years old in 1862.

5.4 Gautier French, d. at age 3.

5.5 Chauncey Edwin French, b. 12 Aug 1859 in in College twp., Knox Co., OH, he lived with his parents, Robert and Sarah A. French, in the 1860 census of Gambier, Knox Co., OH (listed in the Bible Records of Thomas French). He m. Flora V. In the 1910 census, he was living in Paterson, Passaic Co., NJ, stating that both his parents were born in NY. In the 1930 census, he is listed as living in Oakland, Alameda Co., CA, married to Flora V. who was b. in 1861. He d. 17 Mar 1943 in Alameda, Alameda Co., CA. They had one daughter, Flora H., b. 1893 in NJ.

5.6 Elise Gautier French (listed in the Bible Records of Thomas French), b. 20 Sep 1871 in College twp., Knox Co., OH or in Gambier, Knox Co., OH. She m. William Lowe Rice of Wilmington, DE, on 2 Oct 1889 in Gambier, OH. William was a prominent attorney in Cleveland, OH who was murdered in Cleveland on 5 Aug 1910 while Elise and her four daughters vacationed on Cape Cod. Following his death, she and her children moved to New York City and resided at 550 Park Ave. for the remainder of her life, and took an active life in various social and civic affairs.

Her daughters were Mildred Gautier Rice, Elisabeth Rice, Virginia Ten Eyck Rice, and Helen Lowe Rice. She states her father was born in NY and her mother in England. She died in 1938, the daughter of Dr. Robert Summerfield French of Gambier, Knox Co., OH.

Description: Elise3

In the 1880 census of Chester, Delaware Co., PA, William was single, b. 1862 in Wilamette, Delaware. In the 1900 census of East Cleveland, Cuyahoga Co., OH, Elise and William were living with their 3 children: Mildred, Elise, and Virginia. In the 1910 census of Cleveland Heights, Cuyahoga Co., OH, William and Elise were living with their 4 children: Mildred, Elise, Helen, and Virginia. On 5 Sep 1928 she traveled with her daughter Elise (her husband had died in Cleveland, OH, in 1910) from Southampton, England, on the ship Majestic and returned to the Port of New York on 11 Sep 1928. In may 1923 she had traveled for pleasure to the British Isles, Italy, Belgium, France, Germany, Switzerland, and Holland.

Description: EliseG Description: EliseG1

Sent to the FFA by Ref. [26]: On page 78 of the Fall 2005 issue of The New York Researcher (a publication of The New York Genealogical and Biographical Society), there is a brief article by Carolyn G. Stifel regarding a gift to the Society of a portrait of Elise Gautier (FRENCH) RICE, 1865-1938. The article reads in part as follows:

"Mrs. Rice was the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Robert Summerfield French of Gambier, Ohio, where Dr. French was long associated as an alumnus of Kenyon College. She married William Lowe Rice, a prominent attorney in Cleveland. He was murdered in Cleveland on August 5, 1910, while Mrs. Rice and her four daughters vacationed on Cape Cod. Following his death Mrs. Rice and her children moved to New York City. She resided at 550 Park Ave. for the remainder of her life, and took an active life in various social and civic affairs. The daughters were Mildred Gautier Rice, Elisabeth Rice, Virginia Ten Eyck Rice and Helen Lowe Rice. . . .

"In her letter of July 15, 2005, Mrs. [Rodney W.] Smith shared with me a very personal memory of her grandmother:

"I remember going to visit her every Sunday for a formal luncheon after which each of her grandchildren would have to play a new piece on the piano!! The guests were my mother and 2 of her sisters plus 4 of us grandchildren. She had always wanted a boy, but she only had 1 grandson – the rest of us were all girls. One daughter and granddaughter were never invited – it seems the daughter had "displeased" her in some way. . . . Grandmother's word was The Law! She was also very astute in things financial, helping my mother when she was in-between husbands, etc.

"She was a member of The Colony Club (a founder of the children's dancing school), a member of The Women's Club of London, and the Pilo or L'Interallié Clubs of Paris."

Children of Thomas Gautier French and Annette L. Shepard, 4.5

5.7 Helen Elizabeth French, b. 30 Jun 1853 in Orange Twp, Essex Co., NJ, m. Robert Warren 1883 [20]. She is listed in the 1860 census of Orange, Essex Co., NJ, living with her parents. In the 1870 census of East Orange, she is listed as “Ellen” E. and living with her parents and siblings. In the 1880 census of East Orange, Essex Co., NJ, she was living with her mother as her father had died.

They had a son ca. 1885, and their son was b. 1920, and their son Edward F. Warren was b. ca. 1940 [20].

5.8 Chauncey S. French, b. 23 Mar 1855 in Orange Twp, Essex Co., NJ. He is listed in the 1860 census of Orange, Essex Co., NJ, living with his parents. In the 1870 census of East Orange, he is living with his parents and siblings. In the 1880 census of East Orange, Essex Co., NJ, he was living with his mother as his father had died.

Check following

In the 1900 census of East Orange, he is listed as C.S. French, b. Feb 1868 in NJ, m. to Mary A. Moran, b. Aug 1861 in NJ, and they were married in 1883. Chauncey’s father was born in NY and his mother in NJ.

He m. Mary A., and had daughter Helen French who m. Harbeck. Helen was b. 22 Oct 1883 in NJ and christened at St. Patrick, Elizabeth, Union Co., NJ, stating her parents were John and Mary Moran; her sister H. C. was b. Mar 1886 in NJ; her brother Thomas G. was b. Nov 1887 in NJ. 

Description: Chauncey 

Description: Chauncey2

Description: Chauncey3

5.9 Annie (or Annetta) G. French, b. 21 Oct 1858 in Orange Twp, Essex Co., NJ, living in the 1860, 1870 and 1880 census in East Orange. In 1880 after Annie’s father died, her mother was running a boarding house.

Sixth Generation

Children of Harris Hanna French and Adelaid R. French, 5.1

6.1 Harris Frederick French, b. 17 Dec 1883 in OR. He registered for the WWI draft in La Grande, Union Co., Oregon. He m. Minnie (or Winnie/Winifred) Bell and lived at 1610 Adams Ave., La Grande, Union Co., OR. He was a merchant. He is listed in the 1900 census of Cove, Union Co., OR, and in the 1910 census of La Grande, Union Co., OR, a lodger, living with 6 other people. He m. Winnie (Winifred), b. 1888. They are both listed in the 1920 census of La Grande, Union Co., OR. They are listed in the 1917 U.S. City Directory of Wallowa, Union Co., OR, as shown below:

C. H. Scranton of the firm “French & Scranton” was Claud H. Scranton, b. 1883, m. Jessie Scranton, and lived in La Grande, Union Co., Oregon.

Harris F. French was listed in Ref. [42] in the Academic Department of the Hill Military Academy in 1903/4 and was on the honor roll along with his brothers Robert S. French and Stuart G. French.

Harris d. 16 May 1928 at 44 years, 4 months, 29 days, and is buried at the Holmes Family plot at the Cove Cemetery in Cove, Union Co., OR.

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6.2* Robert Samuel French, b. 21 May 1885 in OR. He is listed in the 1900 census of Cove, Union Co., OR, living with his parents and siblings. He m. Era L. Trippier in Cove, Oregon on 27 Jul 1906, the dau. of Joseph E. Trippeer. Robert worked for the Blue Mt. Live Stock Association in LaGrande, Union Co., OR. Robert and Era appear in the 1930 census of Cove, Union Co., OR. He states that both his parents were born in Ohio, and he is living with his son Stewart T. French (22), and Stewart’s wife Laura A. French (21). Robert owned 530 acres of farm and timber land.

Robert S. French was listed in Ref. [42] in the Academic Department of the Hill Military Academy in 1903/4 and was on the honor roll along with his brothers Harris F. French and Stuart G. French. Below is the Hill Military Academy in 1903 when the French family attended. It was a prive, college preparatory military academy in Portland, OR, opened in 1901, closed in 1959.

Description: Macintosh HD:Users:Mara:Desktop:800px-Hill_Military_Academy_1903.png

From the Centennial History of Oregon [42]:

  

Description: RobertSFrench

In the 1910, 1920, and 1930 census of Cove, Union Co., OR, he is married to Era L., and he states that both his parents were born in Ohio. Era L. was born in IN in 1884.

Robert d. 17 Jun 1833 and is buried at the Kenyon College Cemetery in Gambler, Knox Co., OH, along with his daughter-in-law Sarah A. French and her children.

6.3 Stuart Gautier French, b. 23 Apr 1887, d. 5 Jan 1906 at age 19 (see gravestone above with father). He is listed in the 1900 census of Cove, Union Co., OR, living with his parents and siblings. No heirs.

Stuart G. French was listed in Ref. [42] in the Academic Department of the Hill Military Academy in 1903/4 and was on the honor roll along with his brothers Robert S. French and Harris F. French.

Seventh Generation

Children of Robert S. French and Era L. French, 6.2

7.1 Stewart T. French, b. 27 Mar 1908 in OR.

Stewart (or Stuart) m. Laura Adelia Richards on 5 Jul 1927 in Boise, Ada Co., ID. She was b. in 1909 in OR. Stewart and Laura are listed in the 1930 census of Cove, Union Co., OR, living with his parents.

DNA Testing

Administered by Julia French Wood. For any questions regarding DNA, please email Julia at juliaFWood@aol.com.

A good source for research would be for a male with the surname French of this line to take the DNA test. It is a simple test that doesn’t involve blood. A kit is delivered to your house with special brushes for you to take cheek swabs and the tip is injected into the tiny test tubes to be returned to the lab. After the tests that you ordered are completed, in about 4 weeks, you will be notified and can log in to your personal page at the company to view your results and your DNA matches. They may match up with one of the tests shown here: http://www.familytreedna.com/public/french/default.aspx?section=yresults. The FamilyTree DNA website gives a special lower price to those with the surname French. Read about those who approve of it: http://www.familytreedna.com/testimonials.aspx. To get the discounted price for our French DNA Project group, go to http://small-stuff.com/FRENCH/DNA/ and click at the left on "Join the French DNA Project" then place your order. Julia French Wood suggests the 37 marker test (Y-DNA37), but if you want to start with 25, you can upgrade to a higher test at a later date if needed.

Bibliography

See the Bibliography at the end of this website.